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2.1.1 Staff Personnel Policies

Last updated on:
09/01/2011
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22

This policy describes general information on the development of, administration of, and decisions about personnel policies at Stanford University.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President of Human Resources.

1. Purpose

Staff personnel policies and procedures have been developed on topics that are:

  • Required to comply with applicable laws and regulations, and/or
  • Considered essential in an organization the size and scope of Stanford.

The policies and procedures are intended for supervisors and administrators to:

  • Provide guidance for consistent personnel actions and decisions, and
  • Establish generally applicable performance and behavior expectations in the workplace.

For employees, violation of any policy or procedure described in Chapter 2 (or any other applicable University policy or procedure) may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Many of these policies extend to students and others who work for, or provide services to Stanford. Disciplinary action for these community members are delegated to the appropriate authority.

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2. Policy Authority

a. Policy Development
Personnel policies are approved and authorized by the Vice President of Human Resources, in consultation with Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts and other University officials.

b. Policy Revisions
Send proposals for policy changes to the Vice President of Human Resources for study and recommendation. Approved changes are published in the Administrative Guide and may be communicated in the Stanford Report or by written notice to officers and administrators. Changes in policies for benefit plans (e.g., health, life insurance, disability, and retirement) are reflected in the summary plan descriptions and brochures of the individual plans.

c. Policy Interpretation
Questions regarding policy interpretation should be brought to the attention of senior management and/or your local Human Resources office.

d. Alleged Policy Violations
Suspected policy violation information should be brought to the attention of local senior management and/or local Human Resources office.

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3. Administration of Staff Personnel Policies

University officers and administrators, both academic and nonacademic, are responsible for the administration of University policies and procedures including those applicable to staff. Supervisors who work for officers and administrators are responsible for ensuring that individual employees receive information about personnel policies and procedures as well as providing policy interpretations and/or referrals to appropriate resources.

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4. Exceptions to Personnel Policies

In the event an exception to established policy appears to be necessary, the unique facts of the situation should be discussed in advance with an appropriate representative from Human Resources, usually an Employee Relations Representative. When necessary, cognizant Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts or University officers will be included in the decision-making of proposed exceptions. Exceptions to personnel policies must be approved by the Vice President of Human Resources, or his/her designee.

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2.1.2 Recruiting and Hiring of Regular Staff

Last updated on:
12/14/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.1

This policy reviews all phases of the recruiting and hiring process and the corresponding areas of responsibility.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

All regular staff of the University and SLAC (as defined in Admin Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions), with some limitations:

  • Bargaining Unit—For policies specific to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, see agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining
  • SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC)—Some procedures in this policy do not apply at SLAC. For procedures specific to SLAC, contact SLAC's Human Resources Department.
  • Hospital—"Hospital" refers to both Stanford Health Care (SHC) and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). The hospitals are separate employers, each with its own policies and procedures. Contact SHC or LPCH Human Resources.
Purpose: 
  • To provide policies and guidance that support recruiting and hiring a diverse and talented workforce. To accomplish this, Stanford strongly encourages hiring supervisors to develop the broadest possible applicant pool allowing the best and the brightest candidates—internal and external—to fairly compete for all open positions. Through fair and open competition and application of equitable evaluation criteria, Stanford hires the best available candidates.
  • To meet University policies and practices and comply with federal and state regulations.

1. General Recruiting and Hiring Responsibilities

a. University Human Resources
University Human Resources is responsible for developing, monitoring and overseeing employment policies and providing the University with support services necessary to attain staffing objectives.

b. Local Human Resources Manager
Local Human Resources Manager is the person responsible for administering recruiting and hiring policies for each organization.

c. Hiring Supervisors
Hiring Supervisors are those faculty and staff designated to make staff hiring decisions. Hiring supervisors are responsible for making such decisions in accordance with the policies and procedures established by the University and set forth in this Guide Memo. Each hiring supervisor is accountable for his/her actions in matters relating to applicable sections of this policy, compliance with federal and state regulations governing employment, and performance in achieving affirmative action program goals. Questions on these policies that cannot be resolved at the local level should be referred to the Vice President for Human Resources.

Guide to Supervisors

Typical responsibilities for University Human Resources

  • Conducts full-service recruiting and recruitment programs
  • Develops recruitment and hiring-related programs
  • Consults on recruitment strategies, compliance, diversity, selection and on-boarding
  • Administers online recruiting systems and websites
  • Ensures regulatory compliance; administers recruiting and hiring policies
  • Oversees contingent staffing, international hiring, background checks, third party management (including executive search firms)

Typical responsibilities for Local Human Resources Managers

  • Represents needs of the unit to University HR
  • Develops programs to support local recruiting needs
  • Consults on, and facilitates, the recruiting process within the local unit and between the local unit and University HR
  • Conducts and coordinates position searches, including selection and use of employment search firms
  • Emphasizes the need to ensure affirmative action goals are considered by hiring supervisor
  • Implements and administers recruitment and hiring policies

Typical responsibilities for Hiring Supervisors

  • Makes selection and hiring decisions within the stipulated policies and parameters, including reviewing resumes, interviewing candidates, conducting reference checks, and documenting process and decisions
  • Implements recruiting and staffing policies, programs and processes locally
  • Contributes toward the achievement of affirmative action goals

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2. Recruiting and Hiring Policies

a. Equal Employment Opportunity & Affirmative Action
In accordance with all applicable law, it is the policy of University to:

  • Comply with all affirmative action requirements, and
  • Provide equal employment opportunities for all applicants and employees.

Guide to Supervisors

All employees in a position to make hiring decisions (“hiring supervisors”) are expected to comply with the “Equal Employment Opportunity Statement” distributed annually by the University’s Diversity & Access Office and Guide Memo 1.7.4: Equal Employment Opportunity, Non-Discrimination, and Affirmative Action Policy ' provision on “Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action Policy.”

The University complies with Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 and its regulations. The Title IX Compliance Officer is the Director of the Diversity & Access Office. If you believe the University is not in compliance with Title IX and its regulations, contact the Title IX Coordinator at Kingscote Gardens (2nd Floor), 419 Lagunita Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-8231. Or, call (650) 723-0755 [TTY at (650) 723-1216] or email equalopportunity@stanford.edu.

b. Employment Rights and Preferences of Former and Current Regular Staff
The University gives current and former regular staff certain reemployment rights and preferences described below:

(1) Right to Reemployment or Return to Active Employment
(a) Definition
The right of a former regular staff to reemployment or return to active employment in his/her former University position to the extent required by law.
(b) Who Qualifies
Reemployment rights extend to former regular staff who:

  • Terminated employment to serve in the military. A department that receives an inquiry about reemployment of a former employee returning from the Armed Services should consult with an Employee Relations Representative.
  • Returns from a leave of absence on or before the agreed upon return date (e.g., military, childbirth, family, medical) when the leave was formally requested and granted in accordance with University policy.

(2) Hiring Preference
The University is committed to hiring the best qualified candidate for the job. When the qualifications stated in the job listing and predetermined job-related selection criteria are used to determine each candidate's qualifications, and more than one qualified candidate competes for a job, the employment offer must be extended first to the candidate who has preference according to 2.b.3 below.

(3) Order of preference
Follow this order when considering substantially equal candidates:

(a) First Preference:
Regular staff who have been given written notice of permanent layoff or who are permanently laid off under the policies in Guide Memo 2.1.17: Layoffs. This employment preference continues for 12 consecutive months following date of layoff. Layoff preference also applies to regular staff whose positions are being eliminated and who have been informed that they will be laid off if they do not obtain alternative employment in the same department/administrative unit.
(b) Second Preference:
Current regular staff who meet the qualifications for the position and for whom placement in this job would constitute a promotion, or who have successfully completed a formal training program for the specific job.
(c) Third Preference:
Current temporary or casual employees on the Stanford payroll applying for a position in the same work group reporting to the same supervisor where the employee currently works in a temporary or casual role.

Guide to Supervisors

Policy conflicts may occur between consideration of the hiring preferences and consideration of affirmative action goals. In these circumstances, consult with the local Human Resources Office before making an offer of employment.

c. Employment of Related Persons
Employment by a related person in any position (e.g., regular staff, faculty, other teaching, temporary, casual, third party, etc.) within an organizational unit can occur only with the approval of the responsible Vice Provost, Vice President (or similar level equivalent to the highest administrative person within the organizational unit), or his/her designee. Under no circumstances may a supervisor hire or approve any compensation action for any employee to whom the supervisor is related. An individual may not supervise, evaluate the job performance, or approve compensation for any individual with whom the supervisor is related.

Even when the criteria discussed here are met, employment of a related person in any position within the organization must have the approval of the local human resources office, in addition to the approval of the hiring manager's supervisor, including faculty supervisors. 

Guide to Supervisors

Employment by a related person in any position (e.g., regular staff, faculty, other teaching, temporary, casual, third party, etc.) within an organizational unit can result in an actual or perceived conflict of interest and is strongly discouraged.

The university recognizes that relationships may develop in the workplace. The university expects its employees to disclose relationships as appropriate, and specifically in the case of direct reporting relationships and/or potential conflict of interest situations. Failure to properly disclose a relationship or family connection may lead to corrective action measures being taken.

All of the above requirements also apply to employing and hiring those with consensual sexual or romantic relationships. In addition, consensual sexual or romantic relationships must also be disclosed in compliance with section 4 in Guide Memo 1.7.2: Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships In the Workplace and Educational Setting.

Definition of Related Person—The employee’s spouse; same-sex domestic partner; children of the employee, spouse or same-sex domestic partner; parents and parents-in-law; parent surrogate; brothers and sisters of the employee; grandparents and grandchildren of the employee; and, any other dependent family member who lived in the employee’s residence.

d. Rehiring Former Regular Staff
Regardless of the reason for rehire, all former staff must serve a new Trial Period, including those former staff who meet the reinstatement criteria set forth below.

(1) Reinstating the Hire Date:
Former regular staff will have their hire date reinstated if they left the University in good standing and meet these timelines:
(a) Former regular staff who has been laid off and is reemployed by the University within 24 months following the date of layoff will have the most recent hire date prior to layoff reinstated.
(b) Former regular staff whose employment was terminated for reasons other than layoff will have the most recent date of hire prior to termination reinstated if reemployment occurs within 12 months following the date of termination. Reinstatement includes all of the following:

  • Bridging of service by restoring the most recent hire date in a benefits-eligible position before termination,
  • Restoration of any sick leave balance at the time of termination, and
  • Vacation accrual rate based on the reinstated hire date.

(2) Rehire After Involuntary Discharge
If a regular staff member was terminated from the University for cause, supervisors must consult their local HR Office and Employee Relations Representative before rehire or reinstatement. An individual who was terminated for gross misconduct is not eligible for rehire.

Guide to Supervisors

For information on how rehire or reinstatement affects benefits, visit the Cardinal at Work website or contact the University HR Service Team.

Hiring Hospital Employees—See Guide Memo 2.1.4: Hiring Employees from Stanford Health Care or its Predecessor Companies for information on applicability of University employment policies and eligibility for University benefits when hiring regular staff who was previously employed by Stanford Health Care (or its predecessor companies) or Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.

e. Age as a Hiring Factor
Age (except for persons under 18 who have not graduated from high school) may not be used as a factor in hiring unless it can be shown as a necessary job qualification.

f. Employment of Minors
Before an offer of employment is made, the hiring department must obtain a work permit for applicants under age 18 years who have not graduated from high school. A permit is obtained from the applicant's school district and is retained in the department file.

Guide to Supervisors

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and California law restricts the hours and conditions of employment for minors. Because restrictions on the employment of minors can be complex, supervisors should consult with their local Human Resources Office about specific cases. General restrictions include:

  • Except as part of approved University programs (e.g., Take Our Children to Work Day), minors are not permitted to visit in areas where they would not be permitted to work as employees.
  • Minors ages 16-17: In addition to the above, prohibited from working on hazardous jobs. No other restrictions.
  • Minors ages 14-15: In addition to all the above, during school session, cannot work more than 3 hours/day, 18 hours/week. During school vacation, cannot work more than 8 hours/day, 40 hours/week.
  • Minors under age 14: In addition to all the above, prohibited from most non-agricultural work.

 

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3. Policies And Practices—Search Phase

a. Job Descriptions
Before a job description is entered into the HR Applicant Tracking system:

(1) Hiring supervisor's responsibilities: Identify the functions of the job, define and describe the duties and responsibilities of the position, include required regulatory training, develop and document objective criteria for the selection process, and obtain local Human Resources Office's confirmation of position level and salary range. For guidance, visit Staff Compensation. Qualifications cannot unnecessarily prevent or lessen the employment opportunities for any class of applicants or potential applicants, as identified in Section 2.b.
(2) Local Human Resources Office's responsibilities: Reviews the Position Summary for clarity and content, classification and salary range, and ensures that the job description is entered into the HR Applicant Tracking system. The job requisition is also reviewed for appropriateness of posting.

Guide to Supervisors

Selection Criteria—Use the job description and other relevant criteria established by the hiring supervisor (including education, experience, essential skills, abilities and competencies) to screen applicants and aid in the selection process.

b. Announcing Job Openings
(1) Local Human Resources Offices
All regular staff vacancies must be listed with the appropriate Human Resource office.

  • For SLAC, SLAC Human Resources Department.
  • For campus and School of Medicine, Staffing Services in University Human Resources. Staffing Services announces all openings on Stanford Careers and may use other media as appropriate.

(2) Temporary Employment
Non-regular staff vacancies that do not lend themselves to employment of Stanford students due to the nature of the work and work schedule, may be listed with commercial temporary employment services and/or StanfordTemps.

(3) Text of Advertisements
Advertising and other notification of vacancies must be non-discriminatory and must include reference to the University's commitment to affirmative action and equal opportunity: “Stanford is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.”

c. Posting Period
(1) Definition
A posting period is the period during which information about the job opening is made available and applications are accepted. Generally, postings should not exceed six months except where the hiring supervisor is actively seeking and reviewing applications for the position.
(2) Length of Posting Period
All vacant positions except those filled through an approved posting period waiver (see Section 3.d for information on waivers) are posted online for a minimum of 10 calendar days. The posting period begins when the approved online requisition updates the Applicant Tracking system. Applications are accepted through the full posting period.
(3) Changes in Posting Period
Posting periods may not be shortened or eliminated except through the waiver process (see Section 3.d). Posting periods may be extended at the hiring supervisor's discretion and applications may be accepted beyond the posting period at the supervisor's discretion.
(4) Timing of Employment Offer
Offers of employment may not be made until after the expiration of the posting period or an approved waiver of posting (see Section 3.d).

d. Waiver of Posting
All regular staff vacancies not posted for the minimum posting period must have an approved waiver of posting before an employment offer can be made. The local Human Resources Office may approve waiver requests. However, waiver requests for positions falling within job groups with affirmative action goals for the University must also be approved by the Diversity and Access Office.

Guide to Supervisors

For a list of considerations to help determine if a waiver is appropriate, go to the Staffing Services website.

The local Human Resources Office (HRO) is responsible for following the waiver policy. Every job posting should be reviewed to determine if it is within an EEO job category that is currently underutilized with respect to women and/or minorities for which the University has an affirmative action goal. In addition, approved waivers should meet the approval criteria outlined below. The HRO also ensures that waiver requests do not unduly restrict consideration of individuals with employment preferences, and that Staffing Services receives the waiver documentation in writing (preferably in the Applicant Tracking system).

The Diversity and Access Office will approve or deny waiver requests for positions that fall within EEO job categories for which Stanford has an affirmative action goal.

Approval Criteria—The hiring department must have consulted with Staffing Services to determine if qualified layoff candidates are available. The hiring department must document the reason for requesting the waiver. The local Human Resources Office may approve the waiver request if:

  • The department documents critical operational need, or
  • Affirmative action goals are not negatively impacted, or
  • There is a uniquely qualified/skilled applicant and it is unlikely a better qualified candidate would apply, or
  • The department can reuse a recent (within past six months) applicant pool for a comparable job likely to result in a similar pool.

Denial Criteria—The local Human Resources Office may deny a waiver request if it is determined that the requested action would be inconsistent with the University’s waiver or affirmative action policies.

e. Recruitment of Applicants

(1) Definition of an Applicant
Currently Stanford requires resumes for regular staff positions to be submitted through the Stanford Careers (or Jobs@SLAC) website. Consistent with this requirement, an applicant is defined as any person who meets all of these criteria:

(a) The individual submits a resume for a specific position through the Stanford Careers (or Jobs@SLAC) website,
(b) Stanford considers the individual for employment in a particular position,
(c) The individual's resume indicates the individual possesses the basic qualifications for the position, and
(d) The individual at no time during the selection process prior to receiving an offer of employment removes him/herself from further consideration or otherwise indicates that he/she is no longer interested in the position.

 (2) Equal Opportunity Policy 
With the assistance of Staffing Services and the local Human Resources Office, departments must make every effort to recruit qualified individuals for job openings, keeping in mind the University's commitment to equal opportunity and affirmative action, and any specific affirmative action goals (as opposed to quotas or preferences, which may not be used) established for specific classifications and departments.

(3) International Recruitment
Please review Section 6, International Hiring, before recruiting or hiring outside of the United States.

(4) Search Firms
In general, Stanford makes limited use of the services of executive search firms or employment agencies. In the instances where it is necessary to use such services (e.g., senior level vacancies), departments must consult with the local Human Resources Office before making any arrangement with an outside firm or agency.

Guide to Supervisors

The hiring supervisor is accountable for assuring that the firm or agency is fully informed with regard to its responsibility for meeting the University’s institutional affirmative action and record keeping responsibilities. Consultation on search firms is available from Staffing Services.

For a checklist on how to choose a search firm that meets Stanford’s requirements to provide a widely diverse selection of applicants and the ability to track the applicant pool, go to the Staffing Services website.

Receiving Electronic Resumes—Electronic resumes are submitted to Staffing Services using Stanford Careers. Staffing Services will send applications a written acknowledgement that his/her resume has been received. Electronic resumes are submitted to SLAC using Careers at SLAC.  

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4. Policies and Practices—Selection Phase

a. Employment Application Form

b. International Candidates
Please review Section 6, International Hiring, before selecting an international candidate.

c. Interviews
(1) Standard Administration—Hiring supervisors must ensure standard administration of the interview process, including the equivalent treatment of candidates, avoidance of discriminatory questions and uniform interview content.
(2) Accommodation—At the request of a disabled candidate, accommodation during the interview process may be required.

d. Testing
(1) Prior Approval—
All testing or screening devices used in the employment process must be approved by the AVP, Recruitment & Talent Management in consultation with the Diversity & Access Office, as appropriate. Only standardized, validated test instruments may be considered.
(2) Accommodations—At the request of a disabled applicant, accommodation to enable testing may be required.
(3) Applicability of Test—When used, approved tests must directly relate to essential job functions and be given to all applicants or finalists under the same or equivalent conditions. The test must be scored, evaluated and used as a selection factor equally for all applicants or finalists and maintained with other applications and selection materials.

e. Reference Checks
The hiring supervisor is required to obtain a minimum of two reference checks from previous employers. Reference checks must be part of the candidate’s evaluation and may be used as a factor in the hiring decision if the information is job-related. No offer of employment can be made before completing the hiring process, including reference checks.

GUIDE TO SUPERVISORS

The hiring supervisor must exercise caution to assure that:

  • The names of those contacted for references are retained in the search documentation with any unsolicited written references provided by the candidate,
  • Inconsistent or negative information obtained in a reference check is corroborated, if possible, before it is used in making a hiring decision, and
  • Reference information used in the hiring decision is job-related and can be shown to be a predictor of job performance.

Local Human Resources Offices may provide consultation.

f. False and/or Misleading Statements
Withdraw from consideration any applicant found to have misleading and/or false statements on the employment application or other documents.

g. Review of Personnel Files
Hiring supervisors have access to personnel files of current and former University employees who are finalists for the position. No offer of employment can be made before the hiring supervisor or Human Resources reviews the personnel files.

GUIDE TO SUPERVISORS

Contact the local Human Resources Office for details and assistance (see Guide Memo 2.1.3: Personnel Files and Data).

 

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5. Hiring Decisions, Offers and Documentation

a. Hiring Decisions
Hiring decisions for regular University staff positions are based on the relative job-related qualifications of the applicants for the positions, with full consideration of the employment rights and preferences specified in Section 2.b.

  1. The hiring supervisor is responsible for judging the relative qualifications of each applicant and for making the hiring decision, consistent with University policy and applicable governmental laws and regulations.
  2. The local Human Resources Office is responsible for reviewing proposed hiring decisions and for ensuring compliance with regulations, laws, and/or University employment policies.
  3. The Diversity & Access Office, if notified by an applicant or administrator regarding a particular opening, may delay a proposed hiring action for further review if it appears inconsistent with the University's Affirmative Action Program.

b. Employment Offers

(1) Timing of OfferEmployment offers should be made after:

  • The expiration of the posting period (or, after approval of a waiver request), and
  • The employment action (including in-hire salary) has received all required approvals.

(2) Conditional Offer of Employment—A written conditional offer of employment must be issued by the hiring department to the successful candidate using an approved offer letter template. Approved templates include those for standard hires, promotions and out-of-country hires. If a background check is required by policy, the written conditional offer of employment will inform the candidate that the offer is contingent upon successfully completing and passing a background check.

Guide to Supervisors

Workplace Accommodation—At the request of a candidate or applicant who has a disability, workplace accommodation may be needed. The hiring supervisor should refer to Guide Memo 2.2.7: Requesting Workplace Accommodations for Employees with Disabilities
 
Out-of-Country—If this is an offer of employment for the applicant to work in a primary site outside the U.S., Staffing Services will assist the local Human Resources Office with arrangements. See Section 6 for details on International Hiring.

c. Background Checks
Stanford may conduct background checks, as required by policy. Additional background checking may be required in some job classifications (e.g., Deputy Sheriffs). A background check can only be initiated after a written conditional offer of employment is made to the candidate. Local Human Resources Offices will provide information on specific requirements.

d. Criminal Records
A criminal record will not automatically disqualify a candidate from employment with the university. University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations will conduct an individualized assessment of any criminal record revealed during the background check process. If individual circumstances warrant, a candidate with a criminal record may be disqualified from employment.

e. Documentation and Record Keeping

(1) Pre-Employment
New, transferred, rehired or promoted employees may not start work in the new position until all appropriate forms have been signed and processed.

(2) Non-Selected Applicants

  • The hiring supervisor is responsible for oral or written notification to all non-selected applicants who were interviewed.
  • The hiring supervisor must ensure that all search summary records are completed, including indication of all applicants' status (disposition data) in the HR Applicant Tracking system. For more information, see the Staffing Services website.

(3) Completeness
Records must include the resume and application materials of all applicants for a position, as well as documents pertaining to individuals considered for the position.

(4) Patent and Copyright Agreement
All employees must complete a Patent and Copyright Agreement Form (SU18) as a condition of employment.

(5) Retention Time
The hiring department must retain records relating to a search, selection and employment decision for a minimum of three years following the decision. Should there be a dispute (grievance/litigation), the documents must be retained until the matter is resolved, if not resolved by the conclusion of the three-year period.

(7) More Information
For more information, see the Staffing Services website.

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6. International Hiring

Hiring, transfer or assignment of regular staff outside of the United States must be supported by a demonstrable University business purpose, and approved in writing by the cognizant School Dean or VP. Copies of such approvals should be forwarded to the Global HR Programs Manager in University Human Resources and the Global Business Director in Business Affairs.

Employees assigned or working outside of the United States are subject to local law as well as University policy and procedures when not in conflict with local law.

Guide to Supervisors

Employment Options—Employment regulations in other countries may be very different than the U.S. In light of operational and regulatory complexities, careful consideration should be given to the various employment options in satisfaction of programmatic requirements, before considering an international hire, transfer or assignment. 
Administrative Costs—Assignments outside of the United States typically involve significant additional administrative costs in light of the regulatory and operational complexity involved in such assignments. Accordingly, the supervisor hiring or assigning the employee outside of the United States is responsible for ensuring that the added administrative expense of such an assignment is covered by the applicable budget for the duration of the assignment.
 
Work Authorization—Work authorization and immigration issues may require significant lead-time, and HR managers are responsible for ensuring that appropriate documents are secured prior to foreign employment. The local Human Resources Office cannot process an assignment until the proper work authorization is obtained. All offer letters must be approved by the local Human Resources Office in consultation with the Global HR Programs Manager.
 
Consulting Arrangements—It should be noted with caution that what may appear to be a consulting arrangement by U.S. standards, could in fact constitute an employment relationship in a foreign country, potentially triggering employment, tax and other regulatory considerations.

In general, the same policies and practices are required for international hires as detailed in the ensuing guidelines for U.S. employment. However, local country norms and requirements take precedence, and it is the responsibility of local HR managers and the supervisor to ensure that the employee is apprised of such requirements prior to the effective date of the assignment. Assignments should be of a limited duration for the purpose of addressing tax, expatriate status and visa considerations.

Additional guidance may be obtained from the Global HR Programs Manager at globalhrprograms@stanford.edu in University Human Resources and/or the Global Business Director in Business Affairs.

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2.1.3 Personnel Files and Data

Last updated on:
04/30/2012
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.2

The University maintains personnel information for each employee in order to have a complete, accurate and current record of the employee's salary and job history at the University. This guide memo sets forth policies and procedures to facilitate the establishment, use and maintenance of personnel data, in whatever form maintained.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President of University Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to regular employees (as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions), Academic Staff - Research, and Academic Staff - Libraries. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and the Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

While these policy statements are applicable to all University staff, the SLAC University Human Resources Department maintains its own centralized personnel files and should be contacted for specific procedural information relating to personnel files for SLAC employees.

1. Definition

Employee Personnel Files are defined to include the application for employment, and records which are used or have been used to determine an employee's qualifications for promotion, compensation, termination, or disciplinary action. A detailed list of appropriate contents is provided in Section 3.

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2. Location

Because of the decentralized personnel function at Stanford, the documents which form an employee's personnel file can be found (1) on computerized record-keeping systems and/or digital imaging systems, (2) locally in the Dean's, Director's, Vice Provost's or Vice President's office, (3) in the department head's or supervisor's office, (4) in the Payroll office, and/or (5) at the Personnel Records area at SLAC. All such documents comprise the personnel file.

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3. Contents

Employee personnel files should contain only that information which is directly related to the employee's job duties, salary, performance and general employment history. Medical files, where applicable, must be maintained separately from other files (see Guide to Supervisors on next page). Listed in the three following subsections are many types of documents which, if they exist, are appropriate for retention in employee personnel files. Documents that have not been shared with the employee and the supervisor do not belong in the file(s).

a. Personnel Files and Data Maintained by the Department/Division:

  • Attendance and Absence Records (Note: At SLAC, these items are located in Payroll)
  • For areas that do not use PeopleSoft HRMS, and for periods of time that predate the implementation of PeopleSoft HRMS:
    • Leave of absence correspondence (includes vacation and PTO)
    • Time sheets: TTR, RHT, Hours Worked Record (SU-28); at SLAC, located in Payroll
    • Vacation and sick leave records; at SLAC, located in Payroll
    • Yearly leave records; at SLAC, located in Payroll
  • Offer and/or confirmation of employment letters
  • Classification review letters addressed to employee
  • Correspondence between employee and supervisor that relates to employment
  • Copies of compliance agreements and other University-required agreements, such as HIPAA and those related to use of patents or confidential personnel information/data
  • Disciplinary memos issued to employee
  • I-9 documents and supporting documentation (SLAC)
  • Job application and any attachments (resume, etc.)
  • Job descriptions
  • Job requisitions
  • Layoff notice issued to employee
  • Performance evaluations issued to employee; employee responses thereto
  • Personnel action forms (PAF)
  • Photo ID where required (SLAC)
  • Resignation letter
  • STAP forms and related documents
  • Termination notice issued to employee
  • Transfer or promotion requests
  • Years of applicable experience calculation

b. Payroll and Other Forms Maintained by Payroll:

  • Automatic bank deposit form
  • Disability insurance adjustment forms (DIA)
  • Long term disability vouchers
  • I-9 documents and supporting documentation
  • One-time payment and reduction forms
  • Time sheets (RHTs)
  • Special salary processing form
  • Wage attachments or garnishment notices (completed)
  • W-4 form

Guide to Supervisors—Supervisors are cautioned that “notes to the file” and other documentation not addressed to the employee do not belong in the employee personnel file. The following list provides some examples of the types of documents that should be retained, but separate from the personnel file.

Contact your local University Human Resources manager if you are ever in doubt of what to retain and/or where to retain it.

  • Auxiliary medical files:
    -Disability Claim Forms; SU-17: Accident/Injury Report
    -Physician evaluations
  • Communications from or to University attorneys
  • Employee settlement agreements
  • Employee lawsuits
  • Employee charges to outside agencies (EEOC, DFEH, OFCCP)
  • Employee Relations advice
  • Grievances, grievance responses, and grievance-related documents
  • Memos between management and the Compensation office
  • Personal financial information (loan applications)
  • Records relating to the investigation of a possible criminal offense

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4. Access and Use

Personnel files are confidential and access is limited to protect employee privacy. See:
Guide Memo 1.1.1: University Code of Conduct, section 3
Guide Memo 1.5.2: Staff Policy on Conflict of Commitment and Interest, section 2.b and 2.e
Guide Memo 6.1.1: Administrative Computing Systems, section 3.c
Guide Memo 6.2.1: Computer and Network Usage Policy
Guide Memo 6.4.1: Identification and Authentication Systems, section 5

a. Access by the Employee
Each employee may review his/her own local personnel files by requesting an appointment with the University Human Resources manager during regular business hours. An employee may review his/her own central personnel file by making an appointment with and presenting appropriate identification to the Payroll Office. At SLAC, make an appointment with Personnel Records group in University Human Resources.

A University Human Resources or Payroll staff member will remain present during the time the file is reviewed, allowing sufficient inspection time commensurate with the volume of the file. The employee is permitted to take notes during the inspection. When requested by the employee, Stanford must provide copies of any document signed by the employee relating to the obtaining or holding of employment (i.e. performance evaluation or employment application). Copies of documents may be provided at the employee's expense.

b. Access by a Former Employee
A former employee of the University may have access to his/her file for up to two years after termination. Copies of documents may be provided at the former employee's expense.

c. Access by University Officials
University officers, managers, deans, department heads, University Human Resources professionals, representatives of the General Counsel's office, and other University officials with a business need to do so may review individual files. This access is also extended to hiring officers within the University when the employee is a finalist for promotion or transfer.

d. Access by Summons/Subpoenas
Process servers with summons or subpoenas for documents contained in an individual employee's personnel file should be directed to Payroll, or to the Manager of Employee & Labor Relations at SLAC. Departments are not authorized to accept service of summons or subpoenas.

e. Outside Employment Verification Requests (Former and Current Employees)
Stanford does not respond directly to any employment verification requests. Stanford contracts with a third party service supplier to provide employment, salary, and immigration verification services. Employees should follow the instructions at Stanford's Gateway to Financial Activities for employment verification. Requests for information on SLAC employees should be referred to the SLAC University Human Resources Department.

f. Access by Agents of the University
Agents of the University are required by contract to certify that University personnel data will be treated confidentially and only used for the purposes specified in the contract.

g. Requests for Employment References (Former & Current Employees)
Requests from outside the University for employment references should be directed to the local human resource manager. Requests for information about SLAC employees should be referred to the SLAC University Human Resources Department. Information other than the dates of employment and job classification requires the employee's written consent before the release of information.

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5. Maintenance and Retention

a. Current Employees
An employee's work history at Stanford may include service with many different departments. To streamline recordkeeping, the local personnel files should follow the employee from one department to the next, thereby creating a consolidated personnel file containing the employee's complete job history. Local personnel files must be kept in a secure location to prevent unauthorized access.

No one should be responsible for maintenance of his/her own personnel file or data. For example, the personnel file of a department or school's file administrator should be maintained by that individual's supervisor or manager, as appropriate.

b. Terminated Employees
The final department where a former employee worked is responsible for ensuring that appropriate records are retained for the requisite length of time. Records of former Stanford employees should be retained until the later of eight years following the date of termination or, if a claim is brought (e.g., grievance, lawsuit, or charge with state or federal agency), until the disposition of the claim is final.

c. Destruction of Outdated Information
Personnel files contain confidential information and must be destroyed by shredding, incinerating or, in the case of digital records, purged by the system administrator. When the requisite period of data retention has passed, the records should be destroyed. Contact Employee and Labor Relations or SLAC's University Human Resources before the destruction or purging of any personnel information.

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2.1.4 Hiring Employees from Stanford Health Care or its Predecessor Companies

Last updated on:
09/01/2014
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.3

This policy sets out the applicability of University employment policies and eligibility for University benefits in situations where an SHC employee becomes a University employee.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President of Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to Stanford Health Care (SHC) employees who become University employees.

1. Overview

a. Background and Purpose
The University is separate and independent of Stanford Health Care (SHC). Each entity maintains its own Human Resources department, employment policies and employee benefits.

This Guide Memo explains when the hire date from Stanford Health Services (SHS), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH), UCSF Stanford Health Care (USHC), or SHC will be used instead of the new University hire date for certain University benefits for eligible employees.

b. Definitions
For purposes of this Guide Memo, the following definitions apply:

  • Employed—earning wages or on an approved leave of absence from a regular position eligible for health and welfare benefits with the applicable employer.
  • SHS Hire Date—the actual date of hire at SHS.
  • LPCH Hire Date—the later of January 17, 1997, or the actual date of hire at LPCH.
  • USHC Hire Date—the actual date of hire at USHC.
  • SHC Hire Date—the actual date of hire at SHC.

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2. Eligibility Requirements

a. Eligible Employee
An eligible employee must have been employed by SHS, LPCH or the Stanford University School of Medicine on or before October 31, 1997, or must have been employed on or after April 1, 2000, by SHC (including employment by LPCH). The Tuition Grant Program benefits described in section 8 uses its own definition of Eligible Employee.

b. Direct Change
An eligible employee must "change directly" to employment with the University. For purposes of this policy, a direct change occurs when the employee ceases employment with SHC on one business day and commences employment with the University on the next University business day.

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3. Pay Rate

An eligible employee who becomes a University employee receives a rate of pay consistent with the guidelines that apply to internal University transfers and promotions.

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4. Voluntary Change

An eligible employee who at his/her own discretion applies for and accepts University employment is considered to have made a voluntary change of employers. In such situations, the following criteria apply for benefits eligibility:

a. The most recent University hire date will be used to determine the period of continuous University employment for:

  • Layoff and severance
  • Tuition Grant Program eligibility, except as provided in section 8
  • Staff Development Program — Guide Memo 2.1.12: Staff Development Program

b. The SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC hire date as defined in 1.b will be used to determine:

  • Vacation accrual rate
  • Eligibility for participation and vesting in any University retirement plans
  • Eligibility for and participation in any University-sponsored retiree medical plans

c. Verification Required
Where the SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC hire date is to be used for purposes specified in section 4.b., the hiring supervisor must verify that hire date with Human Resources Management at SHC.

d. Previous University Employment
Where the SHS, LPCH, or SHC hire date occurred upon a direct change of employment from the University, the preceding University hire date plus service while employed at SHC or its predecessors will be used for purposes specified in section 4.b.

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5. Involuntary Change

Occasionally management of SHC may determine that a function performed by a staff member will no longer be provided. If the University offers such an employee the option of continuing his/her position as a University employee, it is considered an involuntary change of employer and the following policies will apply if the employee is eligible:

a. The most recent University hire date will be used to determine the period of continuous University employment for:

  • Tuition Grant Program eligibility, except as provided in section 8, below
  • Staff Development Program — Guide Memo 2.1.12: Staff Development Program

b. The SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC hire date as defined above in 1.b will be used to determine the period of continuous University employment for:

  • Layoff and severance
  • Vacation accrual rate
  • Eligibility for participation and vesting in any University retirement plans
  • Eligibility for and participation in any University-sponsored retiree medical plans

c. Verification Required
Where the SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC hire date is to be used for purposes specified in section 5.b., the hiring supervisor must verify that hire date with Human Resources Management at SHC.

d. Previous University Employment
Where the SHS, LPCH, or SHC hire date occurred upon a direct change of employment from the University, the preceding University hire date plus service while employed at SHC or its predecessors will be used for purposes specified in section 5.b.

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6. Layoff from USHC OR SHC

An employee who accepts layoff and severance from USHC or SHC and subsequently hired by the University will be considered a new employee and the SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC hire date shall not be used for any purpose.

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7. Trial Period

All employees who become University employees will serve a new trial period with the University, even if they have completed a trial period at SHS, LPCH, USHC or SHC or in previous positions at the University.

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8. Tuition Grant Program (TGP)

a. Eligible Employee
For purposes of this section, an eligible employee is a person whose job transferred from the University to SHC, USHC, or SHS because of one of the business transactions specified below, and who was actively employed by the University on the Applicable Date related to the specific transaction, as shown in the chart below. To be eligible, an employee must have had living dependent children on the Applicable Date.

Tuition Grant Program (TGP) Eligibility

 

Applicable Date

Business Transaction Description

August 31, 1994 SHS created
August 31, 1996 Cowell clinical employees transferred from SU to SHS
October 31, 1997 USHC created

 

 The Vice President of Human Resources may determine that other business transactions involving the involuntary transfer of positions and persons in those positions to SHC from the University may result in eligibility of those persons for reinstatement of TGP benefits upon their return to the University.

b. TGP Eligibility
When an eligible employee is re-hired by the University, he/she will have:

  • Prior years of service reinstated and counted towards TGP eligibility under the TGP Guidelines, and
  • Years of service with SHC, USHC, or SHS counted towards TGP eligibility in accordance with the TGP Guidelines.

If, at the time of reinstatement, prior years of service with the University plus years of service with SHC, USHC, or SHS equal 5 or more years of benefits-eligible service, then the employee will be immediately eligible for TGP benefits, assuming all other TGP criteria as stated in the TGP Guidelines, are met.

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2.1.5 Compensation of Staff Employees

Last updated on:
05/25/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.4

This Guide Memo outlines Stanford University's compensation policies.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to regular employees not covered by a collective bargaining agreement and Academic Staff-Libraries as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining for details. This policy also applies to:

  • Temporary and casual employees, where specified
  • SLAC, but implementation procedures may differ
Policy Statement: 

It is Stanford University's policy to pay salaries that reflect the duties and responsibilities of the position and the amount and quality of the work performed in comparison with other university employees, regardless of funding sources. It is also the intention of the university to set salary ranges that provide competitive pay opportunities comparable with relevant labor markets. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford shall not discharge, or in any manner discriminate or retaliate against, employees or applicants because they have discussed, inquired about, or disclosed their own pay or the pay of another employee or applicant. For questions or further information, contact your local Human Resources office.

1. Information Sources

University compensation policies and procedures for staff employees are described in this Guide Memo and these publications and memoranda:

a. Annual memoranda that describe the salary program, issued by the Vice President for Human Resources. These memoranda include current policies and procedures that are reviewed and approved each year.

b. To find specific administrative information on the staff compensation program, see the Compensation website.

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2. Hours of Work and Work Records

a. Workweek
The basic full-time workweek is 40 hours of work on five consecutive eight-hour days. The standard week is a seven-day period commencing at 12:01 a.m. Monday and ending at midnight the following Sunday. Salaried staff employed for a work week of less than the basic 40-hour week receive reduced salary based on the ratio of hours worked to 40 hours. Staff employees who are employed at an hourly rate are paid for the actual time worked.

Straight time is time worked up to eight hours a day and 40 hours a week unless the employee is on an alternative work schedule (see section 6, Alternative Work Schedule).

b. Nonstandard Workweek
Departments may establish other workweek schedules or work arrangements to meet their requirements, including a workweek that begins and ends on other days or hours than the basic workweek (outlined in section 3.a), if approved in advance by the local Human Resources office. See guidelines at Flexible Work Options.

c. Make-Up Time
At the written request of the employee, and with the approval of the supervisor, a non-exempt employee may reduce their work hours on one day and make up the hours not worked on another day during the same workweek. The employee may do this by working more than eight hours but not more than 11 hours in one day, with the understanding that no overtime premium will be paid unless the total number of hours worked in any one day exceeds 11 hours or the total number of hours worked in any one workweek exceeds 40.

If the supervisor compels the employee to work more than eight hours in a day, beyond any request for flexible schedule by the employee, then the employee is due the overtime premium.

d. Day of Rest
Non-exempt employees working more than 30 hours a week are entitled to have at least one day off in seven in compliance with California state law.

e. Rest Periods
The university provides non-exempt employees a 15-minute paid rest period for each four hours of work or "major fraction" of four hours of work (i.e., more than two hours), provided the employees work at least three-and-one-half hours per day. Insofar as practicable, rest periods should be scheduled in the middle of each work period. Rest periods should also be arranged so that disruptions of work and services are held to a minimum. Employees are not permitted to use their rest periods to shorten the workday or to extend the meal break.

f. Meal Periods
Meal periods normally are for one hour and are unpaid. Time taken for meal periods is not part of the work day, provided the employee is relieved of all duty. A non-exempt employee must be provided with an unpaid meal period of at least 30 minutes after no more than five hours of work, and a second meal period of at least 30 minutes after no more than ten hours of work, unless the employee waives the right to the second meal period. A non-exempt employee who works no more than six hours in the workday may also waive the right to a meal period if the supervisor approves.

If a non-exempt employee is not provided with a meal break and/or is not relieved of all duty during a meal break, then the time must be recorded as work hours. Additionally, a penalty of one hour of the employee's straight time hourly rate must be paid to the employee.

g. Note to Supervisors
Unpaid meal breaks, including actual start and stop times, must be recorded in each employee's Axess Timecard. If a meal break is not provided, a one-hour penalty must also be recorded.

h. Work Records

  1. Records for Non-Exempt Employees
    Federal and state laws require non-exempt employees to keep an accurate daily record of hours actually worked, including actual start and stop times and meal breaks. Axess Timecard, in the human resources management system (HRMS) is the system of record to indicate hours worked, including overtime hours and vacation, sick, holiday and other leave time taken by each non-exempt employee.  in  system, records must be updated by the end of each pay period, but it is recommended that employees update their actual work hours each work day. Supervisors (or their departmental designees) must approve non-exempt employees' time records and must approve any variance from the employees' normally scheduled work hours.                                     

    Also see Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations, Guide Memo 2.1.7: Sick Time, Guide Memo 2.1.8: Miscellaneous Authorized Absences, and Guide Memo 2.1.13: Paid Holidays.
  2. Records for Exempt Employees
    Axess Timecard, in the human resources management system (HRMS), is the system of record to indicate vacation, sick and other leave time taken by each regular exempt employee. In that system, records must be updated by the end of each pay period. For exempt employees it is not necessary to report any vacation, PTO or Floating Holiday time less than four hours. For reporting purposes of four or more hours, record a minimum of four hours or the actual time taken if over four hours. Sick time may be taken in any increment. In the case of intermittent Family and Medical Leave, the local Human Resources office must be consulted to ensure that (a) accurate records are maintained of time used for Family and Medical Leave, and (b) the employee's leave balance is properly reduced for time charged to intermittent Family and Medical Leave. Supervisors (or their departmental designees) must approve exempt employees' leave records.
    Also see Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations, Guide Memo 2.1.7: Sick Time, Guide Memo 2.1.8: Miscellaneous Authorized Absences and Guide Memo 2.1.13: Paid Holidays.
  3. Records for Non-Employees
    Stanford is not required to keep a record of hours for consultants or employees of another employer with whom the university has a contract for service.

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3. Establishing Salary Ranges

The Vice President for Human Resources establishes the job classifications and the minimum and maximum rates for each classification's salary range and is responsible for administering the overall salary program. The Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts, Deans or Directors are responsible for administering the pay and classification actions in their area(s).

a. Minimum Wage
In compliance with federal and state laws, employees must be paid the current minimum wage or higher unless a request for a specific exception is allowable under the law and approved by the Vice President for Human Resources. Information on the current minimum wage rate is available from University Human Resources Staff Compensation.

b. Non-Cash Compensation
When the university provides perquisites such as room, apartment, or meals, their value (as determined under tax laws) is added to cash compensation to establish total base pay for computation of insured benefits. When required to be taken as a condition of employment, perquisites are not subject to federal income tax.

c. Performance Increases
Staff employees are eligible for pay increases based on performance. Pay increases are not automatic. Internal pay relationships and relevant market information are considered in setting pay increases.

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4. Overtime Compensation

a. Employees Exempt from Overtime Compensation

(1) Definition of Exempt Employee
Certain employees hold jobs that are exempt from governmental regulations regarding compensation for overtime work. In general, employees are exempt when employed in executive, administrative or learned, creative or computer professional positions as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act. Exempt University employees are not entitled to receive overtime pay.

The Vice President for Human Resources or designee determines the exempt or non-exempt status of university classifications. Special circumstances, such as an employee working in more than one job (also referred to as a dual appointment) that may affect their exempt status, must be discussed with the local Human Resources office before hiring employees into additional jobs.

Normal Expectations—Because of the many activities required to keep the university functioning, full-time members of the academic staff and regular exempt staff may be called upon to perform a variety of services for the institution apart from those normally considered to be their regular job duties. These staff members may be assigned these tasks either within their department or for another area within the university.

Further, it is understood that regular academic and exempt staff may often be expected to work in excess of 40 hours a week. Because these situations are considered to fall within the normal expectations for these staff, they would not constitute grounds for payment of additional compensation and the staff member would not receive payment in excess of 100% of the FTE salary.

If an employee receives a request to perform additional work for a department other than the employee's home department assignment (whether related or unrelated to the employee's current responsibilities), the employee must receive formal approval in advance from their supervisor or provide notification to the supervisor, depending on the duties:

  • For non-teaching duties, the employee must receive prior written approval from their current supervisor and the local Human Resources Office.
  • For teaching duties:
    - If the teaching duties occur outside the employee's normal work schedule, the employee must give prior written notification to their current supervisor and the local Human Resources office.
    - If preparation and/or teaching duties occur during the employee's normal work schedule, the employee must receive prior written approval from his/her current supervisor and the local Human Resources Office.

(2) Further Information
For regular non-bargaining unit staff and academic staff-libraries, contact your Human Resources office.

b. Overtime Entitlement
Any employee holding a non-exempt job and who is required to work more than eight hours in a day, or more than 40 hours in a week, is entitled to compensation in accordance with (1) below. The total hours worked for one or more departments of the university are to be counted in determining overtime even though employment in any one department does not exceed the standard 8-hour day or 40-hour week. University policy provides for overtime payment for hours worked in excess of eight in one day in accordance with state regulations. University policy provides overtime payment for hours worked in excess of 40 in one week in accordance with state and federal regulations. Overtime policies are applicable to non-exempt temporary and/or casual employees as well as to regular non-exempt employees. University requirements and government regulations make it mandatory that overtime hours worked by non-exempt employees be recorded and compensated.

(1) Overtime Rate
The university's policy is to compensate non-exempt employees at a premium rate of one-and-one-half times the hourly rate of pay. Shift premiums are added to the straight-time rate to compute the overtime premium. For employees working a 40-hour week, the hourly rate is the monthly salary divided by 173.33 hours.

  • Non-exempt employees who work in excess of 12 hours per workday or in excess of eight hours on the seventh consecutive day of work in a single work week will be compensated for those excess hours at the rate of twice their regular hourly pay.
  • Overtime Rates:

a. Time and one-half: hours eight through 12 in one workday
b. Double-time: hours after 12 in one workday
c. Time and one-half: first eight hours on seventh consecutive workday
d. Double-time: after eight hours on seventh consecutive workday
e. Time and one-half: after 40 hours in one work week, unless a double-time premium applies

(2) Overtime Hours
Authorized paid time off (e.g., vacation, sick leave, personal time off, holidays, etc.) counts as time worked in determining if a non-exempt employee is entitled to overtime compensation. Leave without pay does not count as time worked.

(3) Overtime Limitations
Overtime work is to be kept to a minimum because of costs. Departments should permit overtime work by non-exempt employees only when it is essential to the operation of the department. State law prohibits persons under age 18 from working more than eight hours per day under any circumstances.

(4) Approval of Overtime Work
Overtime work by non-exempt employees requires approval in advance by the department head or a designated representative who has the authority to schedule work and approve overtime compensation. Non-exempt employees cannot be authorized to schedule or approve overtime work for themselves. Non-exempt employees cannot be authorized to work unpaid overtime. In circumstances where a part-time employee plans to work in more than one job for the same or other department(s), the employee’s supervisors should contact the local Human Resources office for consultation on both topics before implementation.

(5) Approval of Extended Overtime
Departments finding it necessary to schedule overtime for one or more employees on a regular basis for six months or longer as the only means of meeting work requirements, must obtain approval in advance from the appropriate Vice President or Vice Provost.

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5. Alternative Work Schedule

a. Definition
"Alternative work week" refers to a standard work week (40 hours) that is condensed into fewer than five full days. A common alternative work week schedule is four 10-hour days.

b. Guidelines
Guidelines for Flexible Work Options.

c. Administrative Considerations
Managers should consider their operational needs before implementing an alternative work schedule. For example, an alternative work schedule may be used in the academic departments where expanded service hours are needed to accommodate client needs during irregular hours (e.g., students or clients in other time zones), but may be impractical when 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. coverage is the priority.

d. Alternative Work Schedule Election
Upon secret ballot election by affected employees conducted in strict compliance with applicable laws, and with the concurrence of management, non-exempt employees may work an "alternative work week," such as four 10-hour work days, with the understanding that no overtime premium will be due unless the employee works more than 40 hours in any one week, or the supervisor compels the employee to work more than the agreed upon hours in any work day. No alternative work schedule for non-exempt employees may be implemented unless it meets all legal requirements and prerequisites and is reviewed in advance by Employee & Labor Relations in University Human Resources. Contact your local Human Resources office if you are interested in exploring the option of implementing an alternative work schedule, or consult with Employee & Labor Relations and review these guidelines for alternative work schedules or flexible work options.

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6. Special Compensation Situations For Non-Exempt Employees

a. Call-Back Time
"Call-back" time occurs when a non-exempt employee responds to an emergency call and returns to work outside their normal working hours without advance notice. The minimum compensation for "call-back" time is two hours pay. Compensation for "call-back" time includes the actual time spent traveling to and from the "call-back" duty.

b. Standby and Beeper Pay
Employees away from work may be required to remain accessible for consultation or to return to work. Non-exempt employees assigned such duties are eligible to receive partial salary for the duration of the assignment if that assignment restricts their personal activities.
(1) Beeper Pay
If that restriction is to carry an electronic "beeper" (or similar device) and remain within range of the device, and be within 15 minutes travel time to a telephone from which to return a beeper page, the partial salary is 5% of the employee's base pay for hours assigned to beeper duty, but not at work (called "beeper pay"). See Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. However, should an affected employee fail to respond to the page, they will forfeit reimbursement of the beeper pay provision.
(2) Standby Pay
If the restriction is narrower than discussed in (1) above, and the assignment requires the employee to remain at a specific telephone within a specific distance from work to permit being called instantly to return to work, the partial salary is 50% of the employee's base pay for hours assigned to standby duty, but not at work (called "standby pay"). See Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.

c. Shift Pay
Shift premiums are paid to non-exempt full-time employees assigned to shifts other than daytime schedules. Non-exempt employees working full-time and assigned to swing shifts (shifts starting between 2 p.m. and 10 p.m.) will be paid a 10% shift premium. Non-exempt employees working full-time and assigned to owl/night shifts (shifts starting between 10 p.m. and 3 a.m.) will be paid a 15% shift premium.

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7. Temporary Compensation for Work in a Higher Classification

Additional temporary compensation may be appropriate when an employee temporarily fills a position at a higher classification for two or more consecutive months, but typically no longer than six months, subject to additional considerations. The employee retains their classification during the temporary assignment. In addition, non-exempt employees remain non-exempt during the temporary assignment and receive overtime premiums for hours worked in excess of the overtime threshold. For questions or further information, contact your local Human Resources office.

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2.1.6 Vacations

Last updated on:
09/01/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.5

This Guide Memo describes university policy and procedures on accrual and use of vacation leave.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to regular staff employees (as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions), Academic Staff-Research, and Academic Staff-Libraries, except Instructors and Clinician Educators in the School of Medicine. For policies that apply to staff employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. Procedures for SLAC employees may vary. Contingent staff employees do not accrue vacation (see Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, Section 7.b.).

1. Accrual of Vacation

a. "Period of Service" for the Purpose of Determining Vacation Accrual Rates
"Period of service" for the purpose of determining vacation accrual rates means the years of service counted from the employee's initial hire date as a "regular staff employee," as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. Months that count as service are:

(1) those for which some pay is received, and

(2) those following layoff when rehire occurs within 24 months.

b. Accrual Rate Change Dates
Changes in vacation rate accruals (both increases and decreases) are effective on the first day of the employee's anniversary or status change month. The accrual change is credited in the system by the last day of that month.

c. Vacation Accrual Amounts

(1) For Full-time Employment
Vacation leave accrues according to the following tables:

Vacation Leave Accruals, Non-exempt Staff

Qualifying Service
Non-Exempt Staff
Per Hour on Straight Time Pay Status Approximate Days Accrued per Year
During first year 0.057700 15
Beginning year 2 through end of year 9 0.07693 20
Beginning year 10 and thereafter 0.092310 24

 

Vacation Leave Accruals, Exempt Staff

Years of Service
Exempt Staff (Do not track hours worked)
Hours per Calendar Month Approximate Days per Year
During first year 10 15
Beginning year 2 through end of year 9 13.33 20
Beginning year 10 and thereafter 16 24

(2) For Part-time and Part-month Employment
Vacation is credited on a prorated basis for all hours in straight time pay status (not overtime) in the month credited. "Straight-time pay" for the purpose of vacation accrual includes both straight-time pay for work performed and pay for holidays, vacation, and sick time. (For more information, see Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees.) Accrual for exempt employees is prorated based on the proportion of the employee's FTE.

d. Method of Accruing Vacation

(1) Vacation Does Accrue
Vacation accrues from the first month of employment during non-overtime periods of work, sick time, and vacation. During seasonal layoff, vacation accrues as if the employee were continuing to work regular time. Vacation is credited at the end of each month of service.

(2) Vacation Does Not Accrue
No vacation accrues:

  • During any period of terminal vacation, pursuant to section 2.g.(2).
  • During periods of leave with or without pay, including periods of short-term disability, long-term disability, Workers' Compensation, or when using Family Temporary Disability wage replacement (FTD).

e. Maximum Vacation Accumulation

(1) Accrual Limits
Unused vacation accumulates from year to year, but the maximum amount of vacation that a full time employee can accrue is 240 hours (30 work days). If an employee has accrued the maximum, vacation ceases to accrue Vacation time will again accrue after the employee uses vacation time and the balance falls below 240 hours. The employee is not credited any vacation not earned due to having reached the 240 hour accrual maximum. New accruals will not exceed the 240 hour maximum.

(2) Accrual Limits for Part-time Employment
The maximum allowable accrual is prorated based on the eligible employee's FTE.

(3) Approval for Exceptions
Any exception to the maximum allowable accrual must be requested in writing in advance by the employee's department, must identify the unique operational requirements that warrant the exception, and must be directed to the Vice President for Human Resources. Only the Vice President for Human Resources may grant an exception to the accrual maximum.

(4) Change in Status
When an employee's change in status from full-time to part-time results in an employee's vacation accumulation exceeding the employee's new maximum, the employee is paid for the excess at the time of the status change unless the employee and the employee's department mutually agree upon arrangements for the excess to be taken within a short period of time. Such arrangements can provide for a combination of payment and vacation. Payment is based on the pay rate that was in effect immediately before the status change.

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2. Use of Vacation

a. No Advance on Vacation
Employees may not use vacation before it has been credited, except for borrowing up to the amount the employee would normally accrue in one month to cover time that would otherwise be unpaid during Winter Closure.

b. Scheduling of Vacations
Departments are responsible for providing opportunities for employees to take vacations each year. Vacation should normally be taken in the fiscal year when it is accrued. Specific arrangements are subject to supervisory approval and scheduling compatible with depart-mental operational needs, and should consider the employee's preferences. If an employee has not scheduled vacation, they may be required to use accrued vacation time before the close of the fiscal year in which it was accrued, or before the close of a grant or contract that supports the employee's salary.

c. Reporting Vacation Time

­(1) Non-Exempt Employees
Record all vacation time taken during a pay period in the human resources management system (HRMS).

(2) Exempt Employees
Vacation time is generally not reported in increments of less than four hours. For reporting purposes of four or more hours, record a minimum of four hours or the actual time taken if over four hours.

d. Use of Vacation for Non-vacation Absences
Vacation accruals can be used for other absences (e.g., disability, personal, Winter Closure) when requested by the employee and approved by the supervisor.

e. Advance Pay for Vacations
See Guide Memo 2.2.3: University Payroll.

f. Pay in Lieu of Vacation
Vacation accruals cannot be converted to cash except when employment terminates or when a change in employment status results in an employee's accumulation exceeding the maximum allowable (see 1.e.(1) above).

g. Vacation Payment upon Termination

(1) Lump Sum Payment. At the termination of their regular staff employment with Stanford University, employees receive a lump sum payment at their current rate of pay for their accrued vacation and any unused PTO time and Floating Holiday hours.

(2) Terminal Vacation. Terminal vacation is a benefit the university offers to employees who are retiring or being laid off, in which the affected employee may elect to use their accrued vacation, unused PTO, and Floating Holiday hours in the period immediately following the employee's last day of active work. The time is used at the work commitment level held at retirement or layoff (e.g., a full-time employee will use 8 hours per day) to remain on the payroll. Any remaining accruals that are less than a full day are paid out to the employee on the last full day of terminal vacation.

a. Eligibility: Only employees who are retiring or being permanently laid off may elect to use unused Vacation accruals, Floating Holiday time and PTO hours after the last day of actual work.

b. Notice: A laid off employee must submit to the local Human Resources office written notice of their election to use accumulated hours in the form of terminal vacation within seven (7) calendar days of receiving notice of layoff. A retiring employee must submit to the local Human Resources office written notice of their election to use accumulated hours in the form of terminal vacation at least seven (7) calendar days prior to the last day of active work.

c. Additional Employment: While an employee is receiving terminal vacation pay, they cannot be employed in any other Stanford University position if such employment would cause the total hours/amount paid to be more than the work commitment and pay level that existed prior to layoff or retirement.

d. On the first work day following the Terminal Vacation Period:

  • The effective date of layoff or retirement will begin.
  • The laid-off employee's bridging period and severance repayment period begins.

h. Leaves of Absence
An approved leave of absence without pay is not a termination of employment and lump-sum payment of accumulated vacation is not provided when an employee takes leave without pay.

i. Changing Positions
When an employee leaves one position and accepts another position within the university, the employee retains their accumulated vacation accruals. The employee is subject to any policies applicable to the new position regarding vacation time, including policies regarding vacation time use and limits on vacation time accruals.

j. Fixed-Term Appointees and Employees on Fixed Funding
Employees on fixed-term appointments and regular staff employees paid from fixed funding sources may be required to use all accrued vacation before the end of the fixed-term appointment period or the expiration of the funding source.

k. Non-exempt Employees Working Premium Shifts
Employees who regularly work swing or owl/night shifts (see Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees, Section 7.c) and thus normally receive shift premium pay continue to receive shift premium pay for hours charged to vacation leave.

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3. Guide to Supervisors

a. Records and Reports of Vacation
Employees must update leave records at the end of each pay period. When an employee terminates, refer to the Human Resources Management System job aids and look in the Termination section. To compute the monetary value of vacation, see How to: Calculate Vacation Accrual. For more information, see Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees.

b. Reporting Vacation Accumulation to Employees
Employees can view their vacation accrual amounts in Axess or on their pay statements.

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2.1.7 Sick Time: Regular Staff Employees, Regular Academic Staff-Research and Regular Academic Staff-Professional Librarians

Last updated on:
12/09/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.6

This Guide Memo describes paid sick time accrual and usage policies for regular staff employees, regular academic staff-research staff, and regular academic staff-professional librarians.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to regular staff employees not covered by a collective bargaining agreement, regular Academic Staff-Research Staff, and regular Academic Staff-Professional Librarians, as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For purposes of this Guide Memo, all these types of employees will be referred to as "regular staff employee(s)."

For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. Procedures for SLAC employees may vary.

1. Accrual

a. Eligibility
Regular staff employees of the University delineated in the Applicability section above accrue and use sick time as described below.

b. Accrual of Sick Time

  • Regular staff employees accrue sick time as follows:
    • Exempt regular staff employees accrue sick time at the rate of 8 hours per month of full-time pay.
    • Non-exempt regular staff employees accrue sick time at the rate of .046154 hours per hour of straight time. This equates to 96 hours or 12 days a year in an average year of 2,080 straight time hours.
    • For part-time and part-month employment, sick time is credited on a prorated basis for any month a regular staff employee receives any straight-time pay. Straight-time pay for this purpose includes both straight-time pay for work performed and pay for holidays, vacation and sick. Accrual for an exempt regular staff employee who is employed part-time or part-month is based on the proportion of the regular staff employee with 100% FTE.
  • Unused sick time accumulates from year-to-year, with no maximum limit.
  • When changing positions: When a regular staff employee leaves one position and accepts another position within the university, the employee retains his/her sick time. The employee is subject to any policies applicable to the new position regarding sick time, including policies regarding sick time use and limits on sick time accruals. If a regular staff employee's acceptance of a new position results in a limit on sick time accruals due to the policy applicable to the new position, any sick time in excess of the limit will be returned to the employee's accruals if the employee returns to a regular staff employee position consistent with the service bridging timelines set out in Section 2 of Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff.
  • No advance: Sick time must be accrued before it can be used.
  • During temporary layoff, sick time accrues as if the laid-off regular staff employee continued to work regular time. (For more information, see Section 2 of Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.17: Layoffs).
  • If a regular staff employee separates from the University in good standing and is rehired by the University into a regular staff employee position within 12 months from the date of separation, previously accrued and unused sick days shall be reinstated. In the case of a layoff, previously accrued and unused sick days shall be reinstated if the regular staff employee is rehired into a regular staff employee position within 24 months from the date of layoff. (For more information about the University's policy regarding bridging of service, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff.)
  • Sick time shall not be paid out upon separation of employment.
  • A maximum of 24 hours or three scheduled workdays of protected sick time use per year, whichever is greater, may be used pursuant to the California Paid Sick Leave Law enacted by Assembly Bill 1522. After this amount of sick time has been used, regular staff employees may use remaining sick time pursuant to this Guide Memo 2.1.7, and the remaining sick time is not subject to the protections of the California Paid Sick Leave Law.

c. No Sick Time Accrues

  • No sick time accrues during periods of leave with or without pay beginning 8/1/05 or later, including short-term disability, long-term disability, worker's compensation and family temporary disability wage replacement (FTD).
  • No sick time accrues during a laid off or retiring regular staff employee's use of terminal vacation. (For more information, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations.)

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2. Acceptable and Unacceptable Uses of Sick Time

a. Illness or Injury
Sick time may be used when a regular staff employee's illness or injury prevents the regular staff employee from working.

b. Medical and Dental Appointments
Sick time may be used for all medical and dental appointments. Medical and dental appointments may also be charged to vacation, PTO or floating holiday. Medical and dental appointments include:

  • Diagnosis, care or treatment of an existing health condition
  • Preventive care
  • Appointments associated with a work injury (e.g., physical therapy)

c. Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking
Sick time may be used by a regular staff employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking in order to:

  • Obtain or attempt to obtain any relief, including but not limited to a temporary restraining order, restraining order or other injunctive relief, to help ensure the health, safety or welfare of the victim or his/her child
  • Seek medical attention for injuries caused by domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking
  • Obtain services from a domestic violence shelter, program or rape crisis center as a result of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking
  • Obtain psychological counseling related to an experience of domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking
  • Participate in safety planning and take other actions to increase safety from future domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking, including a temporary or permanent relocation

d. University Holidays and Sick Time
For holidays that occur on days when a regular staff employee's absence due to illness/injury is fully charged to sick time, and the regular staff employee is not on other leave status, the time off is charged as a paid holiday.

e. During Vacation
When a regular staff employee is hospitalized or confined to bed by medical direction while on vacation, the time of hospitalization/confinement should be charged to accrued sick time. If appropriate, a claim should be submitted for disability plan benefits. (For instructions about submitting a disability claim, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves.)

f. During Winter Closure
If a regular staff employee has to use vacation, PTO or floating holiday for certain days during Winter Closure, accrued sick time may be used instead but only in the following limited circumstances:

(1) Sick time may be used for days during Winter Closure that occur within an approved medical leave period, provided the regular staff employee was on the approved medical leave immediately prior to Winter Closure.
(2) Sick time may be used for days during Winter Closure for which Liberty Mutual approved or approves disability or family temporary disability payments and for which days the regular staff employee needs to use paid sick time in order to maintain base pay. (For more information, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves.)

g. Family Sick Time

(1) Family Sick Time
Regular staff employees may use a maximum of 15 sick days during a calendar year of service (January 1 to December 31) for diagnosis, care or treatment of an existing health condition of, or preventive care for, a regular staff employee's family member. For the purpose of this policy, family member includes only the regular staff employee's:

  • Spouse or registered domestic partner
  • Children of the regular staff employee or spouse or registered domestic partner (including a biological, adopted or foster child, stepchild, legal ward or a child to whom the regular staff employees stands in loco parentis, regardless of the child's age or dependency status
  • Parents and parents-in-law (including a biological, adoptive or foster parent, stepparent, or legal guardian of a regular staff employee or the regular staff employee's spouse or registered domestic partner, or a person who stood in loco parentis when the regular staff employee was a minor)
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Grandparents or grandchildren
  • Other family member dependent on the regular staff employee and living in the regular staff employee's household

(2) Regular staff employees may also apply for family sick leave. (For instructions about submitting a family sick leave claim, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves.)

h. Use of Sick Time to Maintain Pay during Disability
Unless the regular staff employee applies to his/her department in writing for an exception, which is approved, the university uses a regular staff employee's accrued sick time to maintain the regular staff employee's base pay during times when the regular staff employee is receiving disability benefits payments. (For more information, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves.)

j. Unacceptable Use of Sick Time:
Unless otherwise specifically allowed by this Guide Memo 2.1.7, sick time may only be used for an absence that a regular staff employee has during scheduled work hours.

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3. Administration

a. Notification of Absence
The regular staff employee reports the absence (or planned absence) to the supervisor. The department is responsible for establishing and communicating rules on how regular staff employees notify the department of absences. If the need for sick time use is foreseeable, the regular staff employee shall provide reasonable advance notice. If the need for sick time use is unforeseeable, the regular staff employee shall provide notice of the need for sick time use as soon as practicable. The first 24 hours or three scheduled workdays of accrued sick time use per year of employment, whichever is greater, shall not be denied for a regular staff employee's failure to provide details about the sick time use. Regular staff employees may be asked to schedule appointments at a time convenient for the department. Where flexible schedules are possible for the department, supervisors are encouraged to accommodate appointments by flexing a regular staff employee's work hours.

b. Recording and Reporting Sick Time Accumulation and Use
The University uses the human resources management system (Axess/PeopleSoft HRMS) to record sick time credited, used and accumulated for all regular staff employees. Records must be updated each pay period for all employees who used sick time. (For more information, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees. For information about Axess see the Time & Leave System overview.)

c. Sick Time Credit Date
Sick time is credited at the beginning of each month of service. An adjustment is made at the beginning of the following month when the actual accrual is different than anticipated.

d. Tax Status
Sick time is taxable income. Federal, state, and FICA taxes are deducted.

e. Medical Confirmation

(1) Medical Confirmation Related to Use of Sick Time
Acceptable medical evidence may be required for the use of sick time. However, for a regular staff employee's use of the first 24 hours of sick time (or three scheduled work days, whichever is greater) during each year of employment, excepting circumstances involving abuse or misuse of sick time as stated in subpart (2) below, supervisors may not require acceptable medical evidence, and supervisors should not deny sick time use based on a regular staff employee's failure to provide details about the sick time use. The supervisor who approves the use of sick time is responsible for confirming that the conditions for use of sick time are met.

(2) Medical Confirmation Related to Possible Abuse or Misuse of Sick Time
If the University has reasonable basis to believe that a regular staff employee may have engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time at any time (even during the first 24 hours or three scheduled workdays of sick time use during each year of employment), the University may ask for acceptable medical evidence or other proof showing that a regular staff employee has not engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time. Abuse or misuse of sick time, failure to follow sick time notification procedures (e.g., failing to provide reasonable advance notice for foreseeable sick time use, not providing requested medical information when abuse or misuse is suspected, or not giving notice as soon as practicable for unforeseeable sick time use) may be a basis for discipline, up to and including termination of employment. Also, use of sick time may be denied if there is abuse or misuse of sick time.

(3) Acceptable Medical Evidence
Acceptable medical evidence includes, but is not limited to, a healthcare practitioner's statement that certifies a medical need for sick time, the expected duration of absence and anticipated return to work date, and any work-related limitations or restrictions (including the duration of those limitations or restrictions) when a regular staff employee is released to return to work.

f. Applying for Disability
A regular staff employee must apply for disability benefits if using sick time for more than 5 consecutive working or 7 consecutive calendar days for the same illness or injury.

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2.1.8 Miscellaneous Authorized Absences

Last updated on:
12/09/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.7

This policy summarizes the leaves of absence, paid and unpaid, approved by the university.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular employees as defined in Guide Memo 2.1.7: Sick Time: Regular Staff Employees, Regular Academic Staff-Research and Regular Academic Staff-Professional Librarians. For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining.

Paid absences approved in advance count as hours worked for purposes of calculating overtime payment [refer to Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees, section 5.b(3)]. The university authorizes these absences: Vacations in Guide Memo 2.1.6, Sick Time in Guide Memo 2.1.7, and Paid Holidays in Guide Memo 2.1.13. In addition, the following absences with continuation of pay are authorized by the university:

a. Voting
When a regular full-time employee, because of the work schedule, is not able to vote outside of regularly scheduled work hours, supervisors shall authorize necessary time off, but not to exceed two hours with pay. Such time off should be scheduled when least disruptive to the department's work.

b. Jury Duty
A regular employee summoned to jury duty receives time off with pay for the periods of absence from scheduled work as required by the court. The employee retains any payments received from the court. The employee must provide verification from the court or jury commissioner of time spent on required jury duty.

c. Court Appearances
A regular employee subpoenaed as a witness in a non work-related matter receives time off with pay for the periods of absence from scheduled work as required by the court.

Absences to appear as a plaintiff or defendant in a non work-related matter should be charged to personal time off, vacation leave, or personal leave without pay.

d. Personal Time Off
A regular employee may take time off from scheduled work for personal reasons with the supervisor's prior approval. An appropriate use of available PTO is to continue pay during winter closure. A full-time employee may use a maximum of 24 hours of paid time off for his/her personal reasons each year. The maximum allowance per year should be pro-rated for newly hired or rehired employees, and for part-time employees.

Personal Time Off (PTO) is available at the beginning of the calendar year. Employees may "borrow" up to their full amount of PTO before it is credited to cover time that would otherwise be unpaid during winter closure. PTO may not be carried forward from year to year. If the employee is to be terminated and has unused PTO, arrange for the employee to take PTO before termination. Any remaining unused PTO is paid in the employee's final paycheck.

When an employee leaves one position and accepts another position within the university, the employee retains his/her unused PTO. The employee is subject to any policies applicable to the new position regarding PTO, including policies regarding PTO use and limits on PTO allowance.

Guide to Supervisors: An employee is not obligated to explain how he/she intends to use personal time off. The supervisor's approval or denial of a request for PTO relates only to whether or not the department/work unit can accommodate the employee's absence.

e. Reporting Personal Time Off

  • Non-Exempt Employees: Record all PTO taken during a pay period in the human resources management system (Axess/PeopleSoft HRMS).
  • Exempt Employees: It is not necessary to report any PTO less than four hours. For reporting purposes of four or more hours, record a minimum of four hours or the actual time taken if over four hours.

f. PTO Augmenting Disability Payments
Unless the employee applies to his/her department for an exception, which is approved, the university uses an employee's accrued time off (sick, PTO for the calendar year, floating holiday and vacation, in that order) to maintain the employee's base pay during times when the employee is receiving disability benefit payments. See Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves, section 6.

g. Bereavement Leave
When there is a death of a close family member of a regular employee, regular pay continues for the necessary period of absence from work, not to exceed five working days. When additional time off is needed, a department may approve use of vacation or personal leave without pay. Definitions of terms used:

  • Close family member: limited to the employee's spouse; same-sex domestic partner; children of the employee, spouse or same-sex domestic partner; parents and parents-in-law; parent surrogate; brothers and sisters of the employee; grandparents and grandchildren of the employee; and, any other dependent family member who lived in the employee's residence.
  • Necessary period of absence: the time required to attend the funeral or memorial service and discharge related responsibilities. This period is subject to approval by the employee's department.

h. Military Training Leave
When required to perform annual military training duty a regular employee receives time off for the period of actual training, up to 17 calendar days a year. The university supplements the employee's military base pay for the scheduled working days of absence, up to the employee's full salary or wage. Employees must complete one year of employment in order to receive supplemental military training pay from the university. (Refer to section 4.f. for procedures.) See your Human Resources Manager for more information.

i. Paid Organ Donor Leave
Under California law, eligible employees are entitled to a paid leave of absence up to 30 days for the purpose of organ donation and up to 5 days for bone marrow donation in any one-year period. Use of accrued time for a portion of the leave will be required to the extent permitted by law. For details, see Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability & Family Leave, section 4.

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2. Other Absences

NOTE: These leaves of themselves are unpaid and do not result in the employee receiving pay from the university. Depending on the nature of the leave, however, an employee may be required to use other accrued time off, e.g., accrued vacation, personal time off, or sick time, during the leave or may be eligible to receive disability benefits pursuant to the terms of the university's Voluntary Disability Insurance plan.

a. Types of Leave of Absence Without Pay

(1) Personal Leave
A regular employee may be placed on personal leave without pay at a department's discretion. Extra time off in conjunction with paid vacation or time off to take care of family circumstances are examples of situations that may be the basis for granting personal leave.

(2) Disability Leave
See Guide Memo 2.1.6: Sick Time, and Guide Memo 2.3.5: Disability and Family Leaves, for information relating to leaves necessitated by the employee's own injury or illness or the illness of a family member.

(3) Professional or Educational Leave
A regular employee may be granted a leave of absence by a department to pursue activities or educational courses that will enhance the employee's value to the university. This type of leave should not exceed one year. Stanford Benefits must be notified prior to the leave start date for continuation of the university’s contributions toward health benefits plans and retirement savings plan. (Time for participation in training, education, or professional development required and assigned by the department is paid work time. Refer to Guide Memo 2.1.12: Staff Development Program, for policy regarding time off with pay to participate in staff training and development programs.)

(4) Public Service Leave
A department may grant a regular employee a leave of absence for temporary participation in community, state, or national affairs, including elective public office. However, long-term or continuing full-time employment by a public or community agency normally is not a suitable basis for approval of a leave of absence.

(5) Military Service Leave
A regular employee who voluntarily enters military service or is called for active duty for an extended period should contact his/her Human Resources Manager for more information. [For short-time periods of military training duty refer to "military training leave" under 1.f. above; for leave of absence right for spouses of military personnel refer to 2.a.(6)-Other Leaves, below.] Certain leaves for family of members of the armed forces are outlined in Guide Memo 2.1.18: Military Leave.

(6) Other Leaves
The university provides leaves of absence as required by law, such as Volunteer Firefighters Leave, Parent's Leave for School Discipline, Parent's Leave for Children in School, Literacy Leave, time off from work for victims of domestic violence or sexual assault, absence from work for victims of crime and certain persons related to victims for judicial proceedings, and leave of absence right for spouses of military personnel while such personnel are on a leave from deployment. Consult with Employee and Labor Relations for details about any of these leaves.

b. Benefits Continuation During Unpaid Absences

(1) Benefits Continuation
The employee's insurance and health care plans will continue during an unpaid leave of absence if the employee pays his/her portion of the cost of coverage. Exception: An employee on a personal leave of absence must pay the entire cost of coverage (employee and employer portion). The employee will be billed the appropriate amount for their benefits during the unpaid leave of absence.

(2) Retirement Contributions
All retirement plan contributions stop while employees are on an unpaid leave of absence.

(3) Benefits Cancellation
An employee on an unpaid leave may choose to cancel coverage during the leave period. If the coverage is not cancelled within 31 days of the start of the leave, the employee will be billed for coverage. To cancel coverage, the employee must take action; visit the Cardinal at Work website or contact the University HR Service Team. The employee can re-enroll in benefits as soon as he/she returns to work in a benefits-eligible position.

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3. Policies for Leaves of Absence

a. Length of Leave
Each leave of absence must be for a definite period with specific starting and ending dates. A leave cannot extend beyond the end of a fixed-term appointment. Whenever a proposed leave will result in a total period of absence exceeding 12 months, prior approval is required from local Human Resources Manager and the Vice President for Human Resources (or his/her designee) or the Director of Human Resources at SLAC. Approval of leaves exceeding 12 months should be rare.

b. Reinstatement Requirement
A department granting or recommending a leave of absence is obligated to reinstate the employee in the same or a similar position at the end of the leave. Under special circumstances, the Vice President for Human Resources (or his/her designee) may approve a recommended leave when the employee has waived in writing the reemployment obligation. A leave of absence is not appropriate when the employee cannot provide reasonable assurance of intention to return to University employment at the end of the leave.

c. Termination of Leave by Layoff
When a layoff situation occurs in a department while an employee is on a leave of absence, normal layoff procedures will apply and will include the employee on leave. If a leave is terminated by layoff, the standard provisions for severance pay, reemployment, and benefits continuation are applicable.

d. Failure to Return from Leave
When an employee does not return to work at the end of a leave, or when a department learns that an employee will not return, the department initiates a termination of the leave and of the individual's employee status, citing the reason for the employee's separation.

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4. Guide to Supervisors

a. Records
PeopleSoft/Axess should reflect both paid and unpaid absences indicating the type of leave and the period of absence. Retain in the department files documentation such as evidence of disability and written request for leave.

b. Advance Approval
When a leave requires advance approval from the Vice President for Human Resources (or the Director of Human Resources at SLAC), the department's request for approval should include the department's written recommendation.

c. Change in Circumstances During Leave Without Pay
When any change in circumstances make it necessary to modify a leave of absence, discuss the situation with the Human Resources Manager before any action is taken.

d. Benefit Plan Arrangements
Employees on an unpaid leave of absence will be billed by Vita Administration Companies for their insurance and health plan premiums on an after-tax basis. Employees must pay the premiums promptly to Vita.

e. Work Schedule Modifications
Supervisors should adhere to University policies and government requirements regarding overtime pay when modifying a nonexempt employee's work schedule to provide the employee with personal time off. (See Guide Memo 2.1.5: Compensation of Staff Employees, for policies on work scheduling.)

f. Procedures for Military Training Pay
The employee should be placed on Leave of Absence Unpaid for reason of Military Service so health and life benefits are not interrupted. When training leave ends, the employee must provide a copy of the pay stub verifying income received from the military. The department then adjusts the employee's pay for the leave period so that the adjusted salary plus military pay equals the usual full-time salary. (See Guide Memo 2.1.18: Military Leave.)

g. Reemployment Rights of Veterans
Any employee who enters military service may have legally guaranteed reemployment rights. When an employee goes into military service, the employee's department should obtain information about these rights from Human Resources.

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2.1.9 Separation from Employment

Last updated on:
09/01/2011
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.8

This Guide Memo outlines Stanford University's policies and procedures for carrying out the separation of employment for regular employees and academic staff.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular employees and academic staff as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. For additional provisions that may apply to certain members of the academic staff, consult with the appropriate local human resources office. While policy statements apply to the entire University including SLAC, some specific procedures given here do not apply at SLAC. Employees should contact the SLAC Human Resources Department for information on separation procedures at SLAC.

1. Policy Statement

It is the goal of the University to separate regular employees and academic staff from University employment as appropriate and necessary and in conformance with all laws and regulations. To that end, the policies and procedures in this Guide Memo will be followed.

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2. Resignation

a. Definition
A resignation is a voluntary termination of employment initiated by the employee. Resignations should be confirmed in writing (see Guide to Supervisors below). A confirmed resignation may be withdrawn at the sole discretion and written approval of the supervisor and the local Human Resources office.

b. Guide to Supervisors
For planning purposes the University requests that employees notify their supervisors as soon as possible of any intention to resign. At least two weeks' prior notice of resignation is expected from non-exempt employees. At least four weeks' prior notice is expected from exempt employees. Supervisors should request that the employee submit a written statement of resignation that includes the date of, and reasons for the resignation. If the employee does not provide a written statement, the supervisor should confirm the oral resignation in writing.

At the supervisor's discretion, along with approval from the local Human Resources Manager, the employee's resignation date may be advanced to an earlier date and pay in lieu of notice given for the remainder of the expected notice period (two weeks for non-exempt employees; four weeks for exempt employees). Pay in lieu of notice may not exceed four weeks.

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3. Retirement

a. Definition
Retirement occurs when an employee who meets the eligibility requirements for an Official University Retiree voluntarily terminates from employment. See Guide Memo 2.1.10: Staff Retirement.

b. Guide to Supervisors
Upon notification of an employee's intended retirement, supervisors should counsel employee to attend a Retirement Workshop presented by the Benefits Department at least 2-3 months before retirement. Find a list of dates and times at the Benefits website in the Events Calendar section.

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4. Death

In the event of an employee's death, the supervisor should notify Stanford Benefits and the local Human Resources office as soon as possible. All employees in benefits-eligible positions (working at least 50% time) are covered by no less than basic life insurance of one times pay up to a $50,000 maximum. See Guide Memo 2.3.1: Survivor Benefit Plans, and corresponding plan summaries.

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5. Conclusion of a Fixed-Term Appointment

a. Definition
A fixed-term appointment is an appointment for which a planned termination date is established and recorded at the time the employee is hired or appointed.

b. Policy
An employee hired or appointed for a fixed-term is terminated by the department at the end of the appointment unless an extension or reappointment has been approved.
(1) Notice
At the time of appointment, the department is to notify a fixed-term employee in writing of the planned termination date. Most Academic Staff appointments have additional requirements regarding notice of either non-renewal or renewal. Consult with the policies specific to those appointments for further guidance.
(2) Grievance Procedure not Applicable
A termination occurring because of the expiration of a fixed-term appointment is not considered a discharge for cause and not subject to any grievance procedure.
(3) Separation Prior to Planned Termination Date
A fixed-term employee may be involuntarily terminated for cause or laid off before the planned termination date of his/her fixed-term appointment. See Guide Memo 2.1.17: Layoffs and Guide Memo 2.1.16: Addressing Conduct & Performance Issues.

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6. Discharge

a. Definition
A discharge is an involuntary termination of employment from the University. See these resources for additional information:

b. Policy
With the exception of Trial Period and Senior Staff, employees cannot be terminated without some form of cause as defined in Guide Memo 2.1.16. A supervisor must consult with the local HR Office before the decision to discharge an employee, and cannot finalize the discharge decision without the concurrence of their next level manager and review and approval by the Office of the Vice President of Human Resources or his/her designee.

(1) Notice
Discharged employees receive two weeks' notice, pay in lieu of notice, or a combination of pay and notice, except in any of these circumstances:

  • Misconduct, e.g., theft, assault, actions that are detrimental to or disrupt the reputation or operations of the University.
  • Facts that lead the University to conclude the employee has abandoned the job.
  • Failure or inability of the employee to return to work at the end of an authorized absence, e.g., temporary layoff, leave of absence or vacation.
  • Other unauthorized absence from work.

(2) Grievance Policy Applies
A termination resulting from conduct and/or performance issue is considered a discharge for cause and subject to Guide Memo 2.1.11: Grievance Policy.

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2.1.10 Staff Retirement

Last updated on:
06/30/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.9

This Guide Memo describes the retirement income plans, health care coverage, and other perquisites available to employees who retire from the University.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all faculty, academic staff, and regular employees as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the applicable agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

1. Retirement Plans

a. University Retirement Plans
Income from University retirement plans is available to all participants who are vested in these plans, whether or not they are Official University Retirees. For detailed information about eligibility, contributions, vesting, and benefits please see each plan's Summary Plan Description, available at the Benefits web site. The Summary Plan Description is the official University communication on these plans and contains a description of how each plan operates and participants' rights under the plan and federal law.

  • Staff Retirement Annuity Plan (SRAP)
    This retirement plan is for certain employees covered by collective bargaining unit agreements. Additionally, due to certain historical Plan provision changes and participant elections, some exempt and nonexempt staff may either:
    (a) Be a current participant in SRAP, or
    (b) Have an accrued SRAP benefit from previous participation while in an active SRAP status.
  • Stanford Contributory Retirement Plan (SCRP)
    This retirement plan is for faculty, academic staff and exempt and non-exempt employees. However, due to certain plan provision changes and participant elections, some employees elected to continue participation in SRAP rather than participate in SCRP. The Summary Plan Description is available on the Benefits web site in the Resource Library.

b. Voluntary Tax-Deferred Annuity Plan (TDA)
This retirement plan is available to all eligible employees immediately upon hire and is intended to supplement the retirement benefits from Social Security and either the SRAP or SCRP plans. For purposes of this plan, "employee" includes faculty and staff; post doctoral scholars; and temporary, casual and contingent employees. Employees make tax-deferred contributions to this supplemental plan and direct where to invest their contributions.

c. Social Security Retirement Benefits 
The Social Security program provides retirement benefits to individuals who have worked long enough in covered employment to become fully insured. Reduced benefits are payable to retirees starting at age 62 and before Social Security normal retirement age based on year of birth. Increased benefits result from deferring retirement beyond normal retirement age. After the start of benefits, amounts earned from gainful employment in excess of limits set by law may reduce Social Security payments. Employees and employers pay the costs of the Social Security program. Local offices of the Social Security Administration will provide additional information and assistance with applications for benefits.

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2. Official University Retirees

a. Eligibility
Only current employees and former employees who have not been terminated for misconduct (and informed in writing that they are ineligible for rehire by the University) may qualify to become an Official University Retiree if age and service requirements are met

1. Employees Hired Before January 1, 1992
Employees with a benefits-eligible hire date before January 1, 1992 can qualify as an Official University Retiree one of two ways:

  • Complete at least 10 years of benefits-eligible service and are at least age 55 at the time of retirement, or
  • Meet the "Rule of 75" [see (2) below].

2. Employees Hired On or After January 1, 1992
Employees with a benefits-eligible hire date on or after January 1, 1992 qualify as an Official University Retiree when all the following requirements are met:

  • At least 10 years of benefits-eligible service, and
  • Age and years of service total 75 or more.
  • This rule is called "The Rule of 75."

3. Gradual Retirement
A full-time staff member who qualifies for Official Retiree status but wishes to retire gradually by continuing to work part-time may make such arrangements when mutually acceptable to his/her department (including a department to which an employee is redeployed), in any increment of time, but no more than a total of two (2) years. Retirement benefits will continue to accrue on part-time employment when provided for in the applicable retirement plan.

4. Reemployment of Retirees
If a retiree returns to Stanford employment, he or she should call Stanford Benefits at (650) 736-2985 to discuss the effect, if any, on retiree health benefits.

b. Official University Retiree Benefit Program

  • Medical Benefits
    Official Retirees may participate in a University-provided retiree medical plan. See the Retiree Health & Welfare Summary Plan Description, available at the Benefits web site for detailed information about eligibility, coverage, University contributions, costs and benefits. At age 65, retirees and spouses must apply for and maintain Medicare Parts A and B.
  • Dental Plans
    Official Retirees may participate in the University-provided retiree dental plan. See the Retiree Health and Welfare Summary Plan Description for detailed information.
  • Perquisites
    Official University Retirees may use University libraries and recreation/ athletic facilities and receive staff discounts for certain athletic events, as provided by the rules and policies of the department which provides the services or facilities. Official University Retirees remain eligible to participate in the Tuition Grant Program.

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3. Guide to Supervisors

a. Arrangements for Retirement
(1) An employee is encouraged to attend a retirement meeting at least 2-3 months prior to his/her potential retirement date.
(2) Retirement is a form of voluntary termination of employment. See Guide Memos 2.1.9: Separation from Employment and 2.2.3: University Payroll.

b. Retirement Gifts
Departments may use University funds to purchase a retirement gift for the retiree. However, a gift of more than nominal value may be taxable to the recipient as additional income. For more information see Guide Memo 2.2.10: Gifts and Awards for University Employees.

c. Reemployment of Retirees
When individuals who have retired from the University are reemployed, the provisions of Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting and Hiring of Regular Staff, and Guide Memo 2.2.3: University Payroll, are applicable.

Health Care: Retirees who are recalled to a benefits-eligible position working between 20-40 hours per week become eligible for the same benefits as an active employee and will need to enroll as such. If a recalled retiree fits these requirements, he/she should call Stanford Benefits at (650) 736-2985. When the recalled retiree terminates employment again, call Stanford Benefits at (650) 736-2985 to re-enroll in retiree medical benefits.

d. Recalled Retiree
If a retiree is receiving payments from SRAP, SCRP or TDA, those benefit payments continue if the retiree is recalled to a benefits-eligible position. In addition, the recalled retiree starts accruing additional retirement benefits based on salary.

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2.1.11 Staff Grievance Policy

Last updated on:
03/09/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.10

This Guide Memo outlines the policy to resolve staff employee complaints at Stanford through a formal grievance process and is designed specifically for regular employees as defined in the "Applicability" section. The Staff Grievance Process is intended to supplement, not replace, routine and informal methods of responding to and resolving employee complaints.

The Staff Grievance Process is located in the Address a Workplace Concern section of the Cardinal at Work website.

Employee complaints covered by the Staff Grievance Process include written corrective actions that are placed in an employee’s personnel file (e.g., written warnings) and involuntary terminations (including layoffs) only. The Staff Grievance Process does not apply to employee complaints regarding other issues such as performance appraisals, Performance Improvement Plans, compensation/benefits or job classifications. Information regarding resources to address workplace concerns can be found at Address a Workplace Concern.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular employees as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.

It does not apply to:

If a trial period, casual, or temporary employee who is involuntarily terminated has concerns and/or feedback regarding their employment, they may contact the local Human Resources Office or University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations.

1. Informal Resolution

Regular and effective communication between supervisors and employees reduces the likelihood of misunderstanding and conflict. Stanford University expects and encourages supervisors and employees to communicate openly and regularly so that the interests of the employee and the university are best served. To support this commitment, the university has this Staff Grievance Process and resource offices such as the local Human Resources Office, University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations, the Faculty Staff Help Center and the Office of the Ombuds to assist employees in resolving employee complaints.

Before initiating Step 1 of the Staff Grievance Process, the employee is strongly encouraged to make at least one informal attempt to resolve their concerns. If the employee feels uncomfortable in attempting to do this by him/herself, assistance is available through the local Human Resources Office, University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations, the Faculty Staff Help Center, or the Office of the Ombuds.

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2. Formal Staff Grievance Process

If the employee is unsuccessful in resolving their complaint informally, they may file a formal grievance with University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations. The Staff Grievance Process and other information is located in the Address a Workplace Concern section of the Cardinal at Work website.

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3. Representation and Support

a. Self-Representation
The employee will act as their own representative at each step in the Staff Grievance Process.

b. Support Person
In the case of a grievance that is heard by a Grievance Advisory Board, the employee may choose to have a support person accompany them to the grievance hearing. The employee may select any one university employee who:

  • is not employed as an attorney
  • is both willing and able to attend the hearing without impairing their own work duties, and
  • receives their supervisor's approval

c. Outside Representation
The Staff Grievance Process does not allow for outside representation of any kind at any step of the process. If at any time before or during the Staff Grievance Process the employee chooses to elect action related to the grievance issue(s) outside of the internal process (such as filing a charge with the EEOC, DFEH, other administrative body, or a lawsuit), the Staff Grievance Process will be terminated without any decision being reached.

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4. Time Frames

All times frames indicated in the Staff Grievance Process are computed in calendar days unless noted otherwise. All parties involved in the Staff Grievance Process must adhere to the time frames specified. Exceptions to this rule will be handled on a case by case basis and must be approved by the Vice President of Human Resources (or designee). The period of the Winter Close is excluded from the time frames.

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5. Administration

University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations have primary responsibility for administering and coordinating the Staff Grievance Process. In addition, University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations is the primary source of assistance for employees and supervisors who have questions or concerns pertaining to the Staff Grievance Process.

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6. Protection Against Retaliation

No adverse action may be taken against any employee because of their good faith participation in the Staff Grievance Process. An adverse action is any action that materially affects that individual’s terms and conditions of employment.

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2.1.12 Staff Development Programs

Last updated on:
07/28/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.11

The Staff Development Program (SDP) supports employee development by providing partial or full reimbursement of the cost of courses, seminars and workshops that enable employees to improve performance in current jobs, prepare for career development, or meet requirements of degree programs related to current performance or planned career development. The SDP consists of two parts: Staff Training Assistance Program (STAP) for job related or career enhancing courses and seminars and Staff Tuition Reimbursement Program (STRP) providing partial to full tuition payment for individuals enrolled in a degree program. See Educational Assistance Programs for additional information.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

1. Eligibility

To be eligible for the Staff Development Program, an employee must meet all the following criteria:

  • Be a continuing regular or fixed-term staff employee (including a bargaining unit employee). See Guide Memo 2.2.1 for definition of regular staff or fixed-term employee.
  • Receive no financial assistance from other sources that would duplicate SDP assistance (scholarships, grants, and departmental funds may augment but not duplicate SDP assistance).

Staff Training Assistance Program (STAP)

  • STAP assistance funds are available to each eligible staff member on the first date of employment.
  • Academic Staff-Teaching: senior lecturers, lecturers, artists-in-residence who work at least 50% time are also eligible for the Staff Training Assistance Program.
  • Faculty, students, temporary employees, retirees, and other non-staff University affiliates are not eligible for STAP assistance.

Staff Tuition Reimbursement Program (STRP)

  • Available after an eligible employee has completed one year in a continuing benefits-eligible position at 50% Full Time Equivalent (FTE) or greater.
  • The amount provided is pro-rated if eligible staff works less than full-time, but at least 50% part-time.
  • Faculty, students, and other temporary workers are not eligible for STRP assistance.

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2. Staff Training Assistance Program (STAP)

STAP assistance may be requested for job-related training, career development, STAP approved health improvement courses through the Stanford Health Improvement Program (HIP), and academic pursuit through the Stanford Continuing Studies Program.

a. Job-Related Training
Training must be directly related to performance requirements of the employee's current assignment, and either maintain or improve job skills; be required by law; or respond to organizational or operational need as defined by employee's supervisor including training required to respond to organizational or operational need as defined by the employee's supervisor or the university. STAP does not cover training to meet minimum educational requirements of the current job, or qualify the employee for a new trade or business.

Training may be a formal course given for academic credit or certificate of completion by an accredited college, university, technical/vocational school or institute, special skills school, or adult education school; a seminar, workshop or special emphasis short-duration program presented by an approved provider; or training obtained at a conference or professional organization. Online training may be allowable if it meets the requirements outlined in Section 2.a. The employee's supervisor must approve the training in advance. Questions about whether the training or the provider is eligible for STAP should be directed to the Stanford STAP administrator prior to the start of the training course or activity.

(1) Release Time/Time Off with Pay for Required Training
An eligible staff employee's supervisor must approve in advance the course as job-related training and approve the release time, if any, to attend the training. Such time off must be compatible with the work schedule of the department and consistent with requirements of contracts and grants regarding time worked. The department funds time off with pay for training.

(2) Reimbursement
Requests for reimbursement of allowable expenses through STAP must be made within 20 days of satisfactory completion of the training, with the supervisor's approval. Submitted requests will be charged against the STAP funds based on the class start date. When employees are reimbursed in advance of course completion, the employee must provide evidence of satisfactory completion to the supervisor. (See Section 5 for procedure).

b. Career Development Training
Training must be related to an identified and planned training objective for career development. Such training may be a formal course given for academic credit or certificate of completion by an accredited college, university, technical/vocational school or institute, special skills school, or adult education school; or be a seminar, workshop or special emphasis short-duration program presented by an approved provider. Career development must only be for training activity that will assist the employee in qualifying for a new position or advancement within his or her current trade or business at Stanford. The employee's supervisor must approve in advance this training and any release time needed to attend.

(1) Release Time/Time Off Without Pay
An eligible staff employee may be granted a maximum of 24 hours per month of release time without pay for approved training for career development purposes if no comparable course is offered during non-work hours. Time off for eligible part-time staff should be pro-rated based on the percent time worked. Approval of time off is at the department's discretion and must be compatible with the work schedule of the department and consistent with requirements of contracts and grants regarding time worked.

(2) Reimbursement
Requests for reimbursement of allowable expenses through STAP must be made within 20 days of the satisfactory completion of the training with the supervisor's approval. Submitted requests will be charged against the STAP funds based on the class start date. When employees are reimbursed in advance of course completion, the employee must provide evidence of satisfactory completion to the supervisor (see Section 5 for procedure). For IT Services, HIP and Continuing Studies courses, the STAP allowance will be deducted from the fee when employees register for classes.

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3. Staff Tuition Reimbursement Program (STRP)

Eligible employees may request STRP support for courses that fulfill undergraduate or graduate degree requirements at a fully accredited college, university, technical/vocational school or institute, special skills school, or adult education school when the employee is admitted to the degree program (certificate programs excluded). Courses must be taken at, or online through, a regionally-accredited institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education in order to be eligible for reimbursement. The employee's supervisor must approve the request if release time/time off (with or without pay) is requested.

Covered degree programs:

  • Associate
  • Bachelor
  • Master
  • Doctoral

Programs that are not covered:

  • Individual courses
  • Certifications
  • Graduate Certificate
  • Degree program entrance exams, such as SAT, ACT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, MCAT
  • Challenge exams or credit by exam, such as CLEP, UEXCEL and DSST

a. Release Time/Time Off without Pay
An eligible staff employee may be granted a maximum of 24 hours per month of release time, without pay, for an approved undergraduate or graduate course, if no comparable course is offered during non-work hours. Time off for part-time regular staff should be pro-rated based on the percent time worked. Approval of time off is at the department's discretion and must be compatible with the work schedule of the department and consistent with requirements of contracts and grants regarding time worked.

b. Tuition Payment
Payment of tuition and covered fees through STRP will be made directly to the institution before attendance each quarter or semester.

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4. Allowable Expenses

An employee may not receive reimbursement under STAP and reimbursement under STRP for the same course or program. For example, you cannot use STRP for tuition and STAP for books, supplies and equipment for the same course or program.

a. STAP Expenses

  • The current maximum STAP reimbursement is:
    • $800 for eligible employees not covered by the SEIU Collective Bargaining Agreement
    • $700 for eligible employees covered by the SEIU Collective Bargaining Agreement
      • $100 of STAP funds for SEIU-represented staff are reallocated for a leadership, training and educational program, known as the Apprenticeship Program. (For additional information, refer to the 2014 Collective Bargaining Agreement between SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, Side Letter 7: Leadership, Training and Educational Fund).
  • Costs of tuition, registration fees and required textbooks, CDs, e-books or tapes are allowable for reimbursement up to a maximum determined each fiscal year.
  • Travel expenses, parking, lodging, meals, professional memberships, testing and exam fees, reference books and professional subscriptions are not allowable.

b. STRP Expenses

  • The current maximum annual STRP benefit amount is $5,250 granted to the eligible employee at the beginning of each fiscal year. Payments and reimbursements are pro-rated for part-time eligible staff working at least 50% time.
  • Covered fees are limited to the cost of tuition, registration fee, lab fees, course fees and eLearning fees.
  • Covered expenses are limited to required books, CDs, DVDs, and other published materials, supplies and equipment, including software. Supplies, equipment and software that the employee may keep after the course is completed are not a covered expense.
  • An employee may not use STAP and STRP funds for the same course or program.

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5. Reimbursement

a. Timing of STAP Reimbursement
Requests for reimbursement of allowable expenses through STAP must be made within 20 days of satisfactory completion of the training, with the approval of the supervisor. Submitted requests will be charged against the STAP funds based on the class start date. Refer to the STAP Frequently Asked Questions for details on the reimbursement process.

b. Timing of STRP Payment
Payment of tuition and covered fees will be made directly to the institution by the program administrator before attendance each quarter or semester. If the employee makes payment directly to the institution, the employee must submit the invoice to the program administrator through a Direct Bill request. The program administrator will make payment directly to the institution, and the institution will issue a credit or reimbursement to the employee.

c. Departmental Reimbursement
When covered costs exceed the current STAP/STRP limit, the excess cost may be partially or fully reimbursed by the employee's department. Departmental reimbursement is at the department's discretion and is determined based on available departmental funds for training. Reimbursement for work-related or career development training may be taxable if the total exceeds $5,250 in one tax year (see Section 7a), regardless of the source of university funds. Departmental reimbursements have the same tax consequences as STAP/STRP reimbursements.

d. Employee Obligation
When the University reimburses an employee for training costs through STAP prior to completion of the activity, the employee assumes an obligation to complete the supported training in a satisfactory manner. An employee who does not complete University-reimbursed training must repay the University the total amount of the reimbursement.

e. Evidence of Satisfactory Completion
Employees utilizing funds for training expenses through STAP must provide the supervisor with evidence of satisfactory completion as soon as possible—but no later than 60 days after the training activity is completed. For STRP, evidence of satisfactory completion must be provided to both the supervisor (if supervisor approval was required) and to EdAssist, the STRP administration vendor, within 60 days of the course end date. Such evidence may be an official grade card or transcript from the institution or provider of the course. Failure to submit evidence of course completion within 60 days will require the employee to repay the tuition/fee/expense amount to Stanford and could result in denial of all future requests for tuition assistance. Refer to the STRP Guidelines for details on the Evidence of Satisfactory Completion submission process.

  • For undergraduate academic courses using STRP funds, a grade C or better, or pass grade in a pass/fail course is required. A grade of C- or less will not be accepted as a satisfactory grade.
  • For graduate academic courses, using STRP funds, a grade B or better, or pass in a pass/fail course is required. A grade of B- will not be accepted as a satisfactory grade.
  • If a course may be taken for either a letter grade or a pass/fail grade, the employee must take the course for a letter grade to be eligible for STRP funds for this course.

f. Repayments
Staff members who have utilized STRP are required to repay tuition and fees that were paid to STRP to an institution for coursework if:

  • Employee withdraws from a course after the tuition was paid
  • Employee fails to submit proof of satisfactory completion
  • For undergraduate course work, the employee receives a grade of C- or lower or Fail (if a Pass/Fail course)
  • For graduate course work, the employee receives a grade B- or lower or Fail (if a Pass/Fail course)

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6. Application Process

a. STAP
An employee planning a training or development activity should discuss development and performance objectives with his/her supervisor before registering for the course or program. Decisions regarding applicability of training and issues regarding release time should be made at this time. The employee and the supervisor should review career development plans before registration. No application form is needed.

Departmental Review
The supervisor should review the staff training assistance request and evidence of satisfactory completion, confirming the following:

  • Employee eligibility (see Section 1)
  • Program applicability (see Section 2 and 3)
  • Covered fees and expenses (see Section 4)
  • Course completion (see Section 5)

Courses taken through the Stanford Health Improvement Program (HIP) or Stanford Continuing Studies Program (CSP) are not subject to supervisor approval unless release time is required.

b. STRP
Prior to April 30, 2015, employee must submit a completed/signed STRP application to the Tuition & Training Programs Office before the beginning of the designated institution's academic year. The application and instructions can be found on the STRP website (My Learning Center). A supervisor's signature is required if release time/time off with pay is requested.

On or after April 30, 2015, employee must submit an application for each term (quarter or semester) no earlier than 90 days prior to the start of classes and no later than 30 days after the start of classes. If a supervisor's signature is required for release time/time off with pay, employee must complete the Supervisor Approval Form. The Supervisor Approval Form can be found and printed from the Stanford My Learning Center website and must be sent to the Stanford STRP office with the employee and supervisor signature within five business days of application submission. Failure to submit the Supervisor Approval Form will result in a denial of the application.

Payment of Tuition and Covered Fees
The Direct Bill option should be used to request payment of tuition and fees directly to the employee's school by following the four-step application process in My Learning Center, located on the STRP website.

Expense Reimbursement
The Expense Reimbursement option should be used if the employee has paid for tuition and/or allowable fees and or expenses. The employee must make the request and submit documentation as proof of payment within 60 days of the course end date.
Detailed information about the application, payment and reimbursement process can be found on the STRP website.

c. Tuition & Training Programs Review
The Tuition & Training Programs office monitors and periodically audits applications for conformance with standards of eligibility, applicability and allowability as outlined in this Guide Memo. The Tuition & Training Programs office has final approval over any disputes, of application denial or denial of payment and reimbursements for approved applications. A decision by Tuition & Training Programs office concerning approval or disapproval of applications, payments or reimbursements is not subject to review under any grievance procedure. Appeal of a decision by the Tuition & Training Programs office may be made in writing to the Director of Tuition & Training Programs in University Human Resources.

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7. Termination of Employment

a. New Applications
No applications will be accepted after employment with the university or SLAC ends.

b. Expense Reimbursement
If employment with the university or SLAC ends before a request for reimbursement of covered expenses has been submitted, an employee may submit a manual request for reimbursement if the reason for termination is for any of the following reasons:

  • Layoff
  • Layoff to Retirement
  • Retirement
  • Military Service
  • Transfer from the University to SLAC
  • Transfer from SLAC to the University

If employment with the University or SLAC ended for any other reason, an employee will not be eligible to request or receive reimbursement for expenses after the date employment ended.  However, if an application was submitted and approved, and tuition and fees were paid directly to the employee’s school prior to the date employment ended for any reason, he or she will not be required to repay that amount.

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8. Tax Implications

SDP is intended to provide benefits that are, to the extent possible, excluded from taxation under federal and state laws. Accordingly, this Guide Memo constitutes a separate written plan for the exclusive benefit of employees under sections 127 and 132(d) of the Internal Revenue Code and its regulations, to provide such employees with educational assistance.

a. General Rule
In general, an employee may exclude up to $5,250 received for graduate or undergraduate education under STRP and up to $800 received under STAP from his/her gross income each tax year for allowable tuition and covered fees and expenses.

b. Tax Year
Employees should note that STRP provides reimbursements of up to $5,250 for each Stanford fiscal year. Because Stanford's fiscal year runs from September 1 through August 31, an employee could be eligible to receive reimbursements in excess of $5,250 for the employee's tax year.

c. Other Situations
Amounts paid to an employee in excess of $5,250 may also be excluded if they are payments for certain job-related training, when such training maintains or improves the skills of an employee. However, if the training is necessary for the employee to meet the minimum educational requirements for employment, or if the training will qualify the employee for a new trade or business, the payments will not qualify for this additional exclusion.

d. Getting Help
Employees should consult their personal tax advisor with any questions.

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9. Status and Duration of Staff Development Program

a. Administration
SDP is administered by the University. The University has the discretionary authority to determine all matters with respect to SDP, including, without limitation, eligibility issues, benefit amounts, evidentiary matters and tax treatment. Its decisions shall be final and binding on all persons.

b. Amendment and Termination
The University reserves the right to modify SDP in any respect, or to discontinue SDP, at any time.

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2.1.13 Paid Holidays

Last updated on:
03/11/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.12

This Guide Memo describes University policy on designation of and payment for holidays. Review current University holidays on the Cardinal at Work website.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to Stanford University employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. This policy does not apply to contingent employees.

1. Eligibility for Paid Holidays

a. Regular staff employees (those appointed for six months or longer on a continuing or fixed-term basis and for at least 20 hours a week) are eligible for paid holidays starting with the first day of employment. Contingent employees are not eligible for paid holidays.

b. To receive holiday pay, an employee must work or be on previously approved paid leave status on his/her regularly-scheduled work day, both immediately before and after the holiday. The sole exceptions are employees on seasonal/temporary layoff, or employees with approved unpaid leave status beginning the day after or ending the day before the holiday.

c. Employees whose last day of work precedes a holiday are not eligible for holiday pay.

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2. Days Designated as Paid Holidays

a. Scheduled Holidays
The days designated by the University for the observance of the following holidays are scheduled each year by the Cabinet. Those dates are normally scheduled as listed below:

Days Designated as Paid Holidays
Holiday Name Date of Holiday
New Year's Day January 1
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day January - third Monday
Presidents' Day February - third Monday
Memorial Day May - last Monday
Independence Day July 4
Labor Day September - first Monday
Thanksgiving November - fourth Thursday
Friday after Thanksgiving November - as stated
Winter Holiday In December; determined each year
Winter Holiday In December; determined each year
Floating Holiday See Section 5 below

 

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3. Policy When A Holiday Falls on a Saturday or Sunday

A holiday that falls on Saturday is observed by the University on the preceding Friday. A holiday that falls on Sunday is observed on the following Monday. When Christmas falls on Saturday and the holiday is observed on Friday, the "Day before Christmas" holiday is observed on Thursday.

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4. Policy When a Holiday Falls During Winter Closure

The University may have a winter closure during the work weeks that include the day before Christmas, Christmas or New Year's Day holidays. Employees in operational units that observe winter closure will receive holiday pay for holidays that fall during the closure, and may use available PTO, floating holiday, accrued vacation, unpaid time off, or any combination of these, on the remaining closure days. See Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.8: Miscellaneous Authorized Absences.

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5. Floating Holiday

a. Floating Holiday Policy
For regular, full-time employees, eight hours of floating holiday are available on January 1 (or date of hire for employees hired after January 1) and can be taken on any day or partial day within that calendar year that is mutually agreed upon by the employee and supervisor. For employees working less than full time, the amount of time credited as the floating holiday is prorated based on the employee's regularly scheduled work hours.

b. Reporting Floating Holiday Time

  • Non-Exempt Employees: Record all floating holiday time taken during a pay period in the human resources management system (Axess/PeopleSoft HRMS).
  • Exempt Employees: It is not necessary to report any floating holiday time less than four hours. For reporting purposes of four or more hours, record a minimum of four hours or the actual time taken if over four hours.

c. Floating Holiday and Winter Closure
Employees may "borrow" up to their full amount of the next year's floating holiday to cover time that would otherwise be unpaid during winter closure.

d. Guide to Supervisors: Floating Holiday in Cases of Termination
If an employee is to be terminated and the earned floating holiday has not been used by the employee, arrangements should be made for the employee to take the floating holiday prior to termination. If this is not possible, report the unused floating holiday on the Termination Web Form. The employee will receive regular pay for the holiday.

e. More information
For more information, contact your local Human Resources Manager (HRM). For a list of HRMs, please see the Public Listing of Stanford HR Managers and Associates on the HR at Stanford website.

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6. Holiday Pay Policy

a. When Day of Holiday Observance Falls on a Scheduled Work Day and Employee Does Not Work on That Day

  • Full-time and Part-time Exempt Salaried Staff
    Full-time and part-time exempt salaried staff receive regular pay for the day.
  • Full-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Full-time non-exempt regular employees receive up to eight hours of regular pay for the straight-time scheduled hours for the day.
  • Part-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Part-time non-exempt regular employees receive pay either for their straight-time hours scheduled for the day, or for the number of hours obtained by dividing their normal number of scheduled weekly work hours by five days, whichever is greater.

b. When Day of Holiday Observance Falls on Employee's Scheduled Day Off and Employee Does Not Work on That Day

  • Full-time Exempt Salaried Employees
    Full-time exempt salaried employees receive another day off with pay in the same calendar year, or when the employee's department determines that another day off is not feasible, eight hours are added to personal time off effective January 1 of the following calendar year.
  • Part-time Exempt Salaried Employees
    (a) When a normal work schedule is the same number of hours daily for five days per week, the employee receives another day off with pay. However, if the employee's department determines that time off on another day is not feasible, the hours are added to personal time off.
    (b) When work schedule is four or fewer days per week or varying numbers of hours daily during each week, the employee receives time off with pay on another work day for the number of hours obtained by dividing the normal number of weekly hours by five days. However, if the employee's department determines time off on another day is not feasible, the hours are added to personal time off.
  • Full-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Full-time non-exempt regular employees receive another day off with regular pay, or when the employee's department determines another day off is not feasible; the employee receives an extra day's pay at one and one-half times the straight-time rate.
  • Part-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Part-time non-exempt regular employees receive another day off with regular pay on another workday either for the straight-time hours normally scheduled for the alternate day off, or for the number of hours obtained by dividing the normal number of weekly work hours by five days, whichever is greater.

c. When Employee Works on Day of Holiday Observance

  • Full-time and Part-time Exempt Salaried Employees
    Full-time and part-time exempt salaried employees may receive partial or full compensatory time off when authorized by the supervisor as appropriate for the operational circumstances.
  • Full-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Full-time non-exempt regular employees receive time and one-half pay for the hours worked on the holiday and either another day off with regular pay in the same pay period, or, when time off cannot be provided, eight hours of extra pay (including shift premium, if applicable).
  • Part-time Non-exempt Regular Employees
    Part-time non-exempt regular employees receive time and one-half pay for the hours worked on the holiday and either time off with pay for the same number of hours within the pay period, or, when time off cannot be provided, extra pay for this number of hours.
  • Temporary or Casual Employees
    Temporary or casual employees, including student employees, receive the established straight-time rate of pay for the time worked or the overtime rate if any time actually worked exceeded eight hours in a day or 40 hours in a work week.

d. When Day of Holiday Observance Occurs While Employee is on Leave

  • When the employee is on vacation, sick leave, or other paid leave from which the employee is expected and scheduled to return to work, the time shall be charged as a paid holiday rather than as vacation, sick leave, or other paid leave.
  • When the employee is receiving Long-Term Disability payments, he or she will not receive holiday pay.
  • When the employee is on a seasonal/temporary layoff period not exceeding 25 calendar days, regular holiday pay for the employee's normally scheduled number of hours will be paid upon the employee's return to work.
  • When the employee is on an unpaid leave of absence, he/she will not receive holiday pay.

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2.1.14 Senior Staff

Last updated on:
04/01/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.13
Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to employees designated at level N, O, P, N11 and N 99 in the university classification system. The list of positions designated as Senior Staff is maintained by the Office of the Vice President for Human Resources.

1. Policy Statement

Senior Staff employees have responsibilities and functions that require different policies and conditions governing their employment and termination. These employees are "at-will" employees and may be terminated at any time for any reason, including layoff, or no reason. Guide Memo 2.1.16: Addressing Conduct and Performance Issues, and the grievance procedure in Guide Memo 2.1.11: Grievance Policy, are not applicable to Senior Staff. Senior Staff have access to the Senior Staff Administrative Review described below.

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2. Purpose

This policy describes the unique employment relationship of Senior Staff to the university. It further sets forth the process for administrative review of Senior Staff employment disputes.

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3. Definition

Effective July 1, 2015, Senior Staff positions are designated at levels N, O, P, N11, and N99 within the university classification system.  Only employees in positions designated at level N, O, P, N11, or N99 on or after July 1, 2015 are considered Senior Staff.

  1. TGP Eligibility. Employees who were designated as Senior Staff prior to July 1, 2015, but who are designated at classification level A-M on July 1, 2015 will no longer be considered Senior Staff, but will retain the TGP coverage they had prior to July 1, 2015.
  2. Housing Program Eligibility. University staff employed 100% time and matched to classification levels O, P and N11 are eligible for one or more housing assistance programs.  For those staff employees who were eligible for staff housing assistance before this date, but are not in classification levels O, P and N11, they will lose their eligibility for any applicable staff housing assistance unless they are already participating in the program.  For any questions about housing program eligibility or details of the programs, please contact Faculty Staff Housing at FSHousing@stanford.edu or 725-6893.

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4. Termination of Senior Staff Employees

a. Termination Policy
Senior Staff may be terminated at any time for any reason, including layoff, or no reason upon the approval of the Dean, Vice Provost, Vice President, Provost or the President or his/her designee. Such termination is subject to the appropriate administrative review, but will not be subject to review under any grievance procedure in the University. Senior Staff who are terminated by the university receive notice and severance pay as described in section 4.c, except when the President or the Vice President for Human Resources or his/her designee determines the termination is for misconduct. Senior staff who voluntarily resign are not entitled to notice or severance pay.

b. Policy on Extended Notice
Senior Staff receive at least three months' notice. When pay is given in lieu of notice, the maximum payment period is three months. A combination of notice and pay in lieu of notice may be appropriate at the university's discretion. In such an arrangement, severance pay may be contingent on serving out a specified portion of the notice period.

c. Policy on Payment of Severance Pay
Senior staff will be paid a minimum of three months' salary and a maximum as listed in the following table, provided a General Release of All Claims and Severance Repayment Agreement is executed. Severance is not payable until the expiration of any revocation period in the General Release of All Claims and Severance Repayment Agreement.

Senior Staff Severance Pay

Years of continuous regular University employment

Severance pay eligibility in months of base pay

Less than 10 years 3
10 years but less than 12 4
12 years but less than 14 5
14 years but less than 16 6
16 years but less than 18 7
18 years but less than 20 8
20 years but less than 22 9
22 years but less than 24 10
24 years but less than 26 11
26 years or more 12


d. Policy on Continuation of Benefits
Senior Staff may continue their university medical insurance and receive the university's regular contributions for three months after the date of termination, subject to prompt payment of any required contributions by the employee. Stanford Contributory Retirement Plan (SCRP) Basic contributions continue during the notice period, including any period of pay in lieu of notice. If the Senior Staff member makes employee contributions to the plan during the notice period, matching contributions will also continue.

e. Policy on Repayment of Severance Pay
The months following the termination date comprise the "severance repayment period." This period is equal to the number of months of severance pay received. If a Senior Staff employee is reemployed by the University before the end of the severance repayment period, that portion of the severance pay equal to the base pay he/she would have earned if not terminated may be retained by the employee. The balance must be repaid to the University as stated in the General Release of All Claims and Severance Repayment Agreement.

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5. Senior Staff Administrative Review

a. Purpose

  • The Senior Staff Administrative Review is a formal guideline for examination by line management of any action that the employee believes constitutes improper treatment and has directly affected him/her.
  • The Administrative Review does not preclude informal discussions with senior university managers in an attempt to resolve problems.

b. Procedure

  • Discussion With Supervisor
    The Senior Staff employee should first discuss the problem with his/her immediate supervisor, indicating the nature of the complaint, the university policies involved, and the desired resolution. The supervisor should respond orally or in writing as expeditiously as possible, but no longer than one week.
  • Written Statement
    If the matter is not resolved by this discussion, the Senior Staff employee may present the problem in writing to the cognizant Dean, Vice President, Vice Provost, or Provost within one week. The Dean, Vice President, Vice Provost, Provost or his/her designee shall consider the issue, make whatever disposition he/she deems appropriate, and respond to the employee in writing within two weeks.
  • Appeal
    The determination of the Dean, Vice President, Vice Provost, or Provost shall be final except in circumstances where he/she had direct and immediate involvement in the decision that gave rise to the complaint in the first instance. In this case, an appeal may be made to the Vice President for Human Resources or his/her designee. Unless the Vice President for Human Resources determines the matter is appropriate for Presidential review, the decision of the Vice President for Human Resources, or his/her designee, shall be final.

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6. Cognizant Offices

a. Policy Revisions
Send proposals for policy changes to the Vice President for Human Resources for study and recommendation.

b. Policy Interpretations
Address questions of policy interpretation to the Vice President for Human Resources.

c. Records
Send copies of appeals and dispositions to the Vice President for Human Resources.

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2.1.15 Trial Period

Last updated on:
03/09/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.14
Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular employees as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

1. Definition and Purpose

The trial period is an initial period of service during which the department assesses the performance of a newly hired regular employee to determine if the employee meets the requirements and expectations of the position.

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2. Policies

a. Length of Trial Period
The trial period is an employee's first 12 months of service as a regular employee with the university, including service as a trainee.

The trial period is automatically extended for the duration of any approved leave of absence. No other extensions of the trial period are permitted.

b. Salary Increases and Bonuses During Trial Period
Trial period employees are not eligible for a salary increase based on merit.  However, trial period employees may receive equity or retention adjustments, and spot or team bonuses, at any time during their trial period.

c. Additional Trial Periods
An employee who has completed a trial period does not serve an additional trial period when transferred, promoted, or assigned to different duties within the university. However, employees who have been rehired must serve a new trial period, including those employees whose original hire date is reinstated pursuant to Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff.

d. Completion of Trial Period
The department should notify the employee by the last day of the trial period that the trial period has been completed or extended due to an approved leave of absence. When such notice is not given, the trial period is considered to have been completed. In extenuating circumstances, the Human Resources Manager may determine that the trial period is not completed if timely notice could not be given.

e. Layoff Trial Period
An employee will serve a layoff trial period for the initial six months in the new position when:

  • Hired into another position following permanent layoff, or
  • Given formal notification of permanent layoff, or
  • Given notice that layoff will result if the employee does not obtain alternative employment in the same department or administrative unit.

If the employee does not complete the layoff trial period successfully, then the employee may revert to layoff status and receive any benefits that may accrue to that status. Reversion to layoff during the layoff trial period may be invoked either by the employee or by the department.

An employee may serve only one layoff trial period following any one layoff, and may invoke the option to revert to layoff status only once. If hired into a second job (either a subsequent or a simultaneous job), the employee does not serve a layoff trial period. Extension of layoff trial period or completion of layoff trial period is handled as described for the trial period.

f. Termination During Trial Period or Layoff Trial Period
The provisions of Guide Memo 2.1.16: Addressing Conduct & Performance Issues do not apply. During the trial period, the employment relationship between the employee and the university is "at-will." This means that employment can be terminated by either the employee or the university at any time and for any reason, or no reason, with or without notice.

The Vice President for Human Resources or his/her designee must approve such terminations.

If an employee who is terminated during their trial period has concerns and/or feedback regarding their employment, they may contact the local Human Resources Office or University Human Resources/Employee & Labor Relations.

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3. Guide to Supervisors

Planning the Trial Period
Supervisors are expected to establish and communicate performance expectations and try to resolve problems during the trial period. Supervisors should consult with their local Human Resources Office about extending a trial period due to an approved leave of absence, or any problems that could lead to a termination of the employee during or at the end of the trial period.

Please contact your local Human Resources Office for any questions related to the trial period.

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2.1.16 Addressing Conduct and Performance Issues

Last updated on:
03/15/2012
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.15

This Guide Memo provides guidance on when and how to use corrective action (including termination of employment) to deal with unsatisfactory performance, misconduct, or a combination of both.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all academic staff and regular employees (who have successfully completed the Trial Period) as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, except Senior Staff. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the applicable agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007, and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining.  

1. Policy Statement

It is the policy of the University that employees are expected to carry out their assigned tasks and responsibilities as instructed and to conduct themselves in accordance with reasonable rules and expectations for the work place. University policy is: Employees cannot be terminated without some form of cause. "Cause" is defined broadly as any legitimate business reason, including but not limited to: Failure to satisfactorily perform job duties or meet job requirements, unavailability for work, excessive absences or tardiness, disclosure/misuse of confidential information, damage or misuse of University property, insubordination, failure to follow University policies and procedures, failure to return from an approved leave, failure or refusal to fully cooperate with a university investigation and/or request for information, or any other misconduct or acts detrimental to University operations.

Written corrective action and involuntary termination are subject to Guide Memo 2.1.11: Grievance Policy.

Corrective action is taken when an employee has not conformed to performance or conduct expectations. University policy does not require corrective action be taken in any formal steps or order, and recognizes that the determination of appropriate corrective action will depend on the facts and circumstances of the particular situation. Moreover, some forms of conduct, including any form of misconduct, warrant immediate termination.

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2. Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to make clear to supervisors and employees when corrective action or termination can be imposed.

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3. Guide to Supervisors

a. Overview
It is the responsibility of the supervisor to provide honest and constructive performance feedback to his/her direct reports.

b. Notice
Supervisors are normally required to give written notice (e.g., memo, performance evaluation, letter, etc.) that performance or behavior is unsatisfactory and improvement is needed before terminating an employee. Such notice may or may not be preceded by verbal coaching. However, prior notice is not necessary in cases where immediate termination is appropriate (please consult with local Human Resources office).

c. Discharge
As mentioned in section 3.b, supervisors are normally required to provide notice to an employee of performance deficiencies before termination. However, there is no requirement that notice be provided before termination of employment in all cases. A supervisor must consult with the local HR Office before the decision to discharge an employee, and cannot finalize the discharge decision without the concurrence of their next level manager and review and approval by the Office of the Vice President of Human Resources, or his/her designee.

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2.1.17 Layoffs

Last updated on:
07/22/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.16

This Guide Memo outlines Stanford University's policies and procedures for carrying out the temporary, seasonal or permanent layoff of employees.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all academic staff and regular staff employees as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. Lecturers, Senior Lecturers, and Senior Staff should refer to Guide Memo 2.1.9: Separation from Employment, and Guide Memo 2.1.14: Senior Staff. For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. While policy statements apply to the entire university, including SLAC, some of the specific procedures given here do not apply at SLAC. Employees should contact the SLAC Human Resources Department for information relating to the procedural aspects of layoff at SLAC. Trial period and contingent (temporary and casual employees) are not eligible for layoff benefits.

1. Policy Statement

Layoffs may be temporary or permanent, and may occur because of budgetary reasons, lack of work, reorganization, or redefinition of the university’s or the department’s needs. The university shall determine when layoffs will occur, the administrative unit, department, or work group in which the layoff will occur (i.e., the layoff unit), and which position(s) are subject to layoff. Such decisions are not subject to review. The layoff process and implementation must be carried out in coordination with the local human resources manager with the approval of Employee & Labor Relations.

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2. Definitions

a. A temporary or seasonal layoff is the removal of a regular staff employee from work for a period not exceeding four months.  A temporary or seasonal layoff occurs when, in the judgment of the university, a temporary reduction in the workforce or of a particular kind of work is necessary within a particular layoff unit. There is no break in continuity of university service during temporary or seasonal layoff.

b. A permanent layoff is the separation from university employment of a regular staff employee who has completed the trial period due to:

  1. the elimination of a position, or
  2. the reduction of a position to less than 75% time, or
  3. the reduction of a position from regular to non-regular status.

 

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3. Layoff Notice

  1. Temporary or Seasonal Layoff
    1. Employees designated for temporary or seasonal layoff should be given at least two weeks’ (14 calendar days’) notice in advance of the layoff date, except in cases of emergency or in circumstances beyond the university’s control.  If notice is provided orally, it should be followed with confirming written notice by no later than the actual date of layoff.
    2. The written notice must include the effective date of layoff and the date the employee is instructed to return to work. Any change to the terms in the layoff notice should also be confirmed in writing.
  2. Permanent Layoff
    1. Notice or Pay in Lieu of Notice: In cases of permanent layoff, the department must give at least one month's (e.g., June 15 through July 14) written notice but no more than three months' written notice. When pay is given in lieu of notice, one month is the maximum period for which such payment can be made.
  3. Early Resignation: If an employee resigns after receiving written notification of permanent layoff and prior to the effective date of layoff, the balance of the notice period will not be converted to pay. However, the employee remains eligible to receive severance pay in accordance with the terms of this policy and the schedule below (see section 6).
  4. Layoff of Academic Staff-Research and Academic Staff-Libraries
    1. When layoffs of research associates or librarians occur for programmatic reasons, the employee must be given at least three months’ written notice. When pay is given in lieu of notice, three months is the maximum period for which such payment can be made.
    2. When layoffs of research associates or librarians occur for non-programmatic reasons, such as lack of available financial support, the employee must be given at least one month’s written notice, or when pay is given in lieu of notice, a maximum of one month's pay.
  5. Change in Layoff Status: Notice of layoff to a regular staff employee may be changed in the following circumstances:
    1. Deferral of Layoff: A regular staff employee who is notified of layoff but has not yet been laid off and who subsequently accepts work that is anticipated to last less than six months will have their layoff date deferred to the end of the temporary assignment. Work can be within the same department or a different department. A letter deferring the layoff must be issued to the employee with the new layoff date. Each layoff can be deferred one time only. If the employee resigns after notification of the deferral, they can receive severance pay, which will be recalculated to reflect the last day of employment. Severance pay is based on the employee’s rate of pay and percentage of full time in the position from which they were laid off.
    2. Rescission of Layoff: A regular staff employee who has received notice of layoff but has not yet been laid off and subsequently is retained by the department either in the same, or a substantially equivalent, regular, benefits-eligible position, will have their layoff rescinded. Under these circumstances, the department shall give written notice to the employee that their layoff has been rescinded, after which the employee is no longer in "layoff status," and will not receive severance pay if they resign. An employee who resigns after receiving a letter of layoff rescission will be considered a "voluntary resignation," insofar as the employee has not received a new notice of layoff. For any future staff reductions, the department should follow the normal notice and layoff procedures of this Guide Memo.
    3. Rehire in a Different Department: A regular staff employee who has received notice of layoff but has not yet been laid off and subsequently is hired by any Stanford University department in a regular, benefits-eligible position will not receive severance pay. The position selected for layoff will still be eliminated or reduced. The employee will serve a layoff trial period as described in Guide Memo 2.1.15: Trial Period.

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4. Benefits and Time Off

  1. Medical Plan Coverage: Stanford will continue its contribution to a laid off employee's medical plan for the employee and their enrolled dependents during the first three months after layoff, provided the employee completes the necessary medical coverage selection within the required timeframe and subject to prompt payment of any required contributions by the employee. The laid off employee is required to pay the full cost of the plan coverage, plus the administrative fee for coverage, after the first three months of COBRA coverage. For temporary or seasonal layoffs, the university will make contributions during the layoff period (up to four months).
  2. Dental and Vision Coverage: The laid off employee pays the full cost of COBRA coverage, plus administrative fees, for dental and vision, beginning with the first day of COBRA eligibility. The university makes no contribution.
  3. Vacation and Sick Leave Accruals: A regular staff employee who has received notice of layoff may accrue vacation and sick leave in any month in which the employee receives pay, unless the employee is on terminal vacation. During temporary or seasonal layoff, vacation and sick leave accrue as if the employee were continuing to work regular time (please see Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations and Guide Memo 2.1.7: Sick Time: Regular Staff Employees, Regular Academic Staff-Research and Regular Academic Staff-Professional Librarians).
  4. Floating Holiday/Personal Time Off: A regular staff employee who has received notice of layoff but has not yet been laid off will have floating holiday hours and personal time off made available on January 1 in accordance with Guide Memo 2.1.13: Paid Holidays and Guide Memo 2.1.8: Miscellaneous Authorized Absences, unless the employee is on terminal vacation.
  5. Holiday Pay/Time Off: A regular staff employee who has received notice of layoff may receive holiday pay for any month in which the employee receives pay, and in which the employee is on paid status preceding and the day following the university designated holiday, unless the employee is on terminal vacation. When the employee is on a temporary or seasonal layoff period not exceeding 25 calendar days, regular holiday pay for the employee's normally scheduled number of hours will be paid upon the employee's return to work (link to Guide Memo 2.1.13).
  6. Outplacement Services: Regular staff employees whose employment terminates due to permanent layoff will be eligible for three months of outplacement services to be used within six months of the date the employee receives written notification of their layoff. The outplacement services shall be provided by an outplacement agency designated by the university, in its sole discretion, and the cost for such services shall be borne by the university in an amount to be determined from time to time, with additional amounts, if any, to be paid by the department from which the employee was laid off and approved by the Vice President of Human Resources (or designee).

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5. Selection for Layoff

  1. Temporary or Seasonal Layoff: Management of the administrative unit, work group, or department decides which employees will be placed on temporary or seasonal layoff. The Dean of Research will review all cases involving senior research associates or research associates.
  2. Permanent Layoff    
    1. Prior to providing notice of layoff to a regular staff employee within the layoff unit, the university should consider terminating temporary and trial period employees, provided the employees remaining in the layoff unit possess sufficient skills and abilities to do the work required. The elimination or reduction of a position as determined above will not result in a notice of layoff if:
      1. The position is occupied by an employee still in the trial period, in which case the employee undergoes termination during the trial period (see Guide Memo 2.1.15: Trial Period), or
      2. The position is occupied by a fixed-term employee whose fixed term of employment concludes at the same time as the position is eliminated or reduced, or
      3. The position is occupied by a temporary employee, in which case the temporary employee will be terminated, or
      4. The position is occupied by an employee who accepts alternate university employment prior to the effective date of the layoff.

Except in the above four cases, the elimination or reduction of a position may result in a notice of layoff.

  1. Management will determine the selection of employees for layoff or retention based on its judgment of the current and prospective operational and performance requirements in the layoff unit, and whether the affected employee's demonstrated performance, knowledge, skills, and abilities meet those requirements.
  2. When management deems that the performance, knowledge, skills, and abilities of employees necessary to meet the current and prospective operational and performance requirements are substantially equal, then length of continuous employment with the university and the university's affirmative action commitments will be considered in selecting employees for layoff, reassignment, or retention.
  3. Failure to Return to Work: If an employee on temporary or seasonal layoff fails to return to work when scheduled to return to work or when recalled to work, the employee’s employment shall be terminated unless a leave of absence is requested and approved in advance of the return date. Written notice of termination must be given to the employee no later than the termination date and must include the date of termination and notice of the employee's right to apply for unemployment compensation benefits.
  4. Reemployment from Layoff Status: An employee who has received notice of permanent layoff and who applies for other employment within the university will have an employment preference for hiring purposes (see Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff). 

 

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6. Severance Pay

  1. Each eligible regular staff employee with one year or more of continuous university employment is eligible to receive severance pay on the date of permanent layoff in accordance with the Severance Pay Table below, provided a signed General Release of All Claims and Severance Repayment Agreement is executed and the Agreement’s revocation period has expired. Severance payment generally is made on the last day of employment or within five working days after expiration of any revocation period in the General Release of All Claims and Severance Repayment Agreement, whichever is later.
  2. An employee will not receive severance pay more than once for the same period of service with the university. To calculate future severance pay eligibility for an employee who was previously laid off:
    1. Determine the severance pay eligibility (in months of base pay) from the table below.
    2. Subtract the eligibility corresponding to the number of months of severance pay previously received.
    3. Add back in any months or partial months of severance pay previously repaid to the university (see Section 6(c)).

For purposes of any future severance calculation for a subsequent layoff, an employee who has received severance pay under the terms of a collective bargaining agreement is reemployed by the university in a position that is not covered by that collective bargaining agreement shall be considered a new employee with length of continuous service with the university only from the date of reemployment unless the severance allowance is repaid in accordance with Section 6(c).


Severance Pay Table

Years of continuous regular University employment1 severance pay eligibility in months of base pay2
1 year but less than 2 0.5
2 years but less than 4 1
4 years but less than 7 2
7 years but less than 10 3
10 years but less than 12 4
12 years but less than 14 5
14 years but less than 16 6
16 years but less than 18 7
18 years but less than 20 8
20 years but less than 22 9
22 years but less than 24 10
24 years but less than 26 11
26 years or more 12
  1. Repayment of Severance Pay
    1. If an employee who has received severance pay is reemployed by the university as a regular benefits-eligible employee before the end of the severance repayment period (see Table in Section 6(b)), the employee may retain only that portion of the severance pay equal to the base pay they would have earned if not laid off (e.g., only the base pay the employee would have received between the dates of layoff and rehire). The balance of the severance pay is to be repaid in full at the time of reemployment, unless the employee authorizes and the university approves a reasonable schedule of repayment and payroll deduction, not to exceed one year in length, in writing on a form provided by Employee & Labor Relations.

Severance repayment will be prorated for an employee rehired into a position with a lower percentage time commitment than the position from which the employee was laid off. An employee may request other arrangements, and if approved, the schedule of repayment will be established by written agreement between the employee and the Vice President for Human Resources. (In the case of Senior Research Associates, Research Associates and all levels of Librarians, such other arrangements shall be between the employee and the Provost's Office.)

2. Effect of Terminal Vacation on Severance Repayment: If the laid off employee elects to take terminal vacation as described in Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations, the severance repayment period begins on the first work day following the terminal vacation period.

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7. Grievance

Involuntary termination due to layoff is subject to Guide Memo 2.1.11: Grievance Policy. Only the decision to select the particular employee for layoff can be grieved.

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Footnote(s): 

1 When used in this Guide Memo, continuous university employment is the period of employment beginning with the employee's most recent hire date as a regular staff employee. Reinstatement of hire date after a break in service is described in Section 2.d of Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff.

2 Base pay means the monthly salary of record and does not include any premium pay (e.g., shift differential, pay for overtime, or supplemental pay). Severance payment is calculated on the base monthly pay at the time of separation or the average base monthly pay earned over the preceding 12 months, whichever is greater.

2.1.18 Military Leave

Last updated on:
01/01/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
22.17

The Uniformed Service Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 ("USERRA") prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who fulfill non-career military obligations in the Uniformed Services. It also requires employers to provide a leave of absence to allow employees to perform military obligations. Separately, the Family Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") entitles eligible employees to take leave for a "qualifying exigency" when a covered family member is called to active duty or to care for a covered family member who is injured in the line of duty.

This policy provides military leaves as required by these and other laws and complies with the other relevant provisions of USERRA, other related regulations or as approved by Stanford University.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular staff as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, Academic Staff-Research, and Academic Staff-Libraries. For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

1. Military Training Leave

a. When required to perform annual military training duty, a regular employee receives time off for the period of actual training, up to 17 calendar days a year. The University supplements the employee's military base pay for the scheduled working days of absence, up to the employee's full salary. Employees must complete one year of employment to receive supplemental military training pay from the University. Contact your local Human Resources Office for more information if needed.

b. Procedures for Military Training Pay
The affected employee should be placed on Leave of Absence Unpaid for reason of Military Service so health and life benefits are not interrupted. Upon conclusion of the training leave, the employee must provide a copy of the pay stub verifying income received from the military. The department then adjusts the employee's pay for the leave period so that the adjusted salary plus military pay equal the usual full salary.

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2. Military Active Service Leave

An employee who voluntarily enters military service or is called to active duty for an extended period will have reinstatement rights to his/her current position if these requirements are met:

  • The employee ensures Stanford receives advance written or verbal notice of military service,
  • The period of service does not exceed five years,
  • The employee returns to work or applies for reemployment in a timely manner after service ends, and
  • The employee separates from military service under honorable conditions.

Contact your local Human Resources office with any questions about this information.

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3. Military Spousal Leave

a. Type of Leave
Under California law, up to 10 days of unpaid leave is available to eligible employees who are spouses/domestic partners of deployed members of the military when the military spouse/domestic partner is on leave from deployment during a time of military conflict.

b. Eligibility
To be eligible for this form of leave, an employee must work an average of 20 or more hours per week and be the spouse or domestic partner of a "qualified member" of the United States Armed Forces, National Guard, or Reserves. A "qualified member" is a member of the United States Armed Forces who has been deployed during a period of military conflict. The employee also must provide: 

  • notice of intention to take family military leave within two business days of receiving official notice that the employee's military spouse will be on leave from deployment, and
  • documentation certifying the employee's military spouse will be on leave from deployment during the time that the employee requests leave.

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4. Leave for Families for Members of the Armed Forces (FMLA)

a. Qualifying Exigency (Emergency) Leave
Qualifying emergency leave allows eligible employees (see 4.c) to use some or all of their 12-week FMLA leave entitlement for an emergency due to a family member's active duty or call to active duty in any branch of the U.S. Armed Forces. Armed Forces include National Guard and Reserves. Qualifying emergencies are defined by regulation and include issues arising from a short-notice deployment, military events, child care, school activities, financial or legal arrangements, counseling, rest and recuperation, post-deployment activities, or any issue the University and employee agree to designate as a qualifying emergency.

b. Military Caregiver Leave
Military caregiver leave allows eligible employees (see 4.c) up to 26 weeks of job-protected FMLA leave in a rolling 12-month period that begins on the verified FMLA start date to care for covered family member who is a member of the Armed Forces and who:

  • suffers serious injury or illness in the line of duty, or
  • undergoes medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy for a serious injury or illness.

Service member means veterans and current members of the U.S. Armed Forces including the National Guard or Reserves.

Eligible employees may request caregiver leave to care for a veteran who:

  • is undergoing medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy for a qualifying serious injury or illness incurred in the line of duty, while on active duty. (A serious illness or injury can include a preexisting injury or illness that was aggravated in the line of duty, while on active duty.), and
  • was a member of the Armed Forces (including the National Guard or Reserves) at some point during the five-year period before undergoing the treatment, recuperation or therapy.

c. Eligibility
(1) Employee must be a spouse, parent, son or daughter of the service member.
(2) Employees are eligible to take this type of leave if employed by the University at least one year and have worked at least 1,250 hours (paid time off, paid leave and unpaid leave not included) during the 12 months before the start of the requested leave.

NOTE: This leave entitlement does not increase the amount of time an employee can be off work for FMLA reasons, except that up to 26 weeks of unpaid leave is available to care for an injured service member during a 12-month period.

For example, if an employee has used 12 weeks of FMLA leave for the birth of a child, the employee is not entitled to an additional 12 weeks of leave within that 12-month period to deal with exigent circumstances arising from a family member call to active duty. But, the employee would be entitled to up to another 12 weeks (for a total of 26 weeks combined) to care for a covered family member who is injured in the line of duty.

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5. Benefits During Military Leave

a. Health and Life Benefits
Employees on unpaid leave for Military Service (MIL) will have the same University benefit contributions as when actively employed. The employee will be billed for the employee portion of the costs on an after-tax basis on the 7th and 22nd of each month.

b. Retirement Savings Plan (SCRP)
When an employee receives adjusted pay upon return from Military Leave, retirement savings plan benefit accruals and/or contributions will be made, subject to plan provisions.

c. Retiree Medical Eligibility
Time on Leave for Military Services counts toward official retiree medical eligibility.

d. Benefits in Cases of Termination

  • Medical and Dental Coverage
    A regular employee whose University employment is terminated while the employee is on Military Leave may continue medical and dental coverages at the employee's expense through COBRA for 18 months.
  • Life Insurance
    Life insurance portability or conversion to an individual plan is available. The employee should contact Stanford Benefits at the time of termination for the appropriate forms.

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2.1.19 Relocation of Faculty and Staff

Last updated on:
03/20/2018
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
36.8; 2.1.20

This Guide Memo sets forth policies and procedures to facilitate the moving and reassignment of new or current Stanford faculty and staff, where such action is considered to be in the best interests of the University. The policy is designed to give maximum flexibility to schools, departments and other organizational units while assuring compliance with federal and state regulations. The provisions of this policy apply only when an offer of employment is made. Allowances during the recruitment process are at the discretion of the vice president or vice provost for the area making the hiring decision (see Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses, section 13).

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer and the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to new and current Stanford faculty and staff except those covered by collective bargaining agreements. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

While policy statements are applicable to the entire University, including SLAC, some of the interpretations of policy contained in this Guide Memo may be different at SLAC. Employees should contact the SLAC Travel Office for guidance regarding relocation policy interpretation at SLAC.

1. Tax Implications

a. Reimbursement Reported as Additional Income
When applying this relocation policy, departments should be aware that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requires the University to report any payments, reimbursements, and advances associated with the move of the employee, the employee’s immediate family, and their household goods and personal effects as additional compensation income to the employee, subject to payroll taxes.

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2. General Policies

a. Responsibility for Administering Policy
This policy is administered by the appropriate vice president, vice provost, dean or designee. Guidance on policy interpretation and procedural issues may be obtained from the Vice President for Human Resources and from the SLAC Travel Office.

b. Responsibility for Relocation Costs
The unit approving the relocation bears all costs.

(1) Charges to Sponsored Projects
Where costs are to be charged to a sponsored project, the terms of the applicable sponsored project award will take precedence.
(2) Exceeding Relocation Allowances
The appropriate vice president, vice provost, dean or designee may authorize the reimbursement of actual moving expenses in excess of the relocation allowances stated in this policy.

c. Reimbursement Authorization
When an offer is made to pay moving expenses, a letter of authorization must be sent to the new employee at the time employment is offered. It is the responsibility of the department issuing the reimbursement request to be sure it complies with the letter of authorization. The letter of authorization must specify:

  • Reimbursable expenses and the maximum actual expenses that will be paid by the University
  • Any lump sum amounts that would be in excess of actual expenses
  • Any expenses subject to tax reporting and withholding

d. Preferred Carriers
The department or the individual being moved can go to Moving Services for information.

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3. Eligibility

Relocation allowances should be offered only when the University feels that payment of part or all of relocation expenses is a significant factor in being able to attract a potential employee to Stanford, or in being able to attract an employee to accept a temporary reassignment. Eligibility for relocation allowances does not establish an entitlement. Payment of relocation expenses to an eligible person is at the discretion of the hiring unit.

a. Stanford Employees
Employees eligible for taxable moving reimbursements and advances per IRS guidelines (see section 1) include:

  • New full-time employees whose new Stanford job location is at least 50 miles farther from their former home than their old job location was from their former home.
  • Current full-time employees temporarily reassigned to a location 50 or more miles away. If such a reassignment is for less than a year, it is a Stanford business expense and not tax-reportable. Travel rules apply; see Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses. However, if relocation is for a year or more, relocation rules apply, as covered in this Guide Memo.

Exceptions to the eligibility criteria may be made by the appropriate vice president, vice provost, dean or designee.

Tax Note: Exceptions that do not meet IRS guidelines (for example: full-time employment or 50-mile distance) are tax-reportable to the employee.

b. Spouses/Same-Sex Domestic Partners and Dependents
Relocation costs for spouses/same-sex domestic partners and dependents are reimbursable to the extent described in this Guide Memo.

Tax Note: Domestic partner expense reimbursements are tax-reportable to the employee.

c. Non-employees and Distinguished Visitors
Travel reimbursements for non-employees and distinguished visitors are described in section 11 of this Guide Memo.

Tax Note: Any reimbursement of moving expenses for a part-time appointment is tax reportable.

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4. House-hunting Expenses

a. Policy
All or part of the expenses associated with a trip to Stanford for the purpose of house-hunting may be reimbursed to a prospective employee. Generally these may include those expenses reimbursable for travel by University employees (see Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses), except that the per diem method may not be used. However, the Per Diem Rates may be used as a guideline for defining reasonable costs.

In addition, the vice president, vice provost, dean or designee may authorize the following:

  • Expenses related to bringing a spouse/same-sex domestic partner
  • Expenses for necessary child care
  • Expenses related to a professional relocation service

Reimbursement for house-hunting expenses does not apply to dependents other than to a spouse/same-sex domestic partner.

b. Procedure — In any instance where house-hunting trip expenses are to be reimbursed by the University, the cognizant University officer should specify in writing to the prospective employee the terms and conditions of the reimbursement, including a maximum dollar amount to be reimbursed. It is the responsibility of the department issuing the reimbursement request to be sure it complies with the letter of authorization. Receipts must be submitted for expenses, as required in Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses, section 14.

Tax Note: All house-hunting expenses are tax reportable.

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5. En Route/Travel Expenses

a. Policy
All or part of the actual expenses associated with a new employee's travel to commence a position at Stanford may be reimbursed. This policy also covers spouses/same-sex domestic partners and dependent children living at home. Costs covered include reasonable transportation costs (see Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses) and actual and reasonable costs of lodging, meals and gratuities. Mileage reimbursement is at the current Stanford rate (see Mileage Reimbursement Rates).

b. Procedure
See section 4, House-hunting Expenses.

c. Guidelines
The cognizant vice president, vice provost, dean or designee defines reasonable costs. If further guidance is needed the following guidelines are suggested:

  • Transportation Costs — Airline tickets may be reimbursed. If a vehicle is driven, a typical minimum expectation for travel by personal auto is 350 to 400 miles per day.
  • Lodging, Meals and Gratuities — Although the per diem method may not be used for reimbursement, the per diem rates may be used as a guideline for defining reasonable costs.

Tax Note: Tax-reportable items in en route/travel expenses include:

  • All domestic partner expenses
  • Airline tickets
  • Meals and gratuities
  • Vehicle mileage allowance over the IRS approved mileage rate for moving (see Mileage Reimbursement Rates)

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6. Temporary Living Expenses

a. Policy
A reasonable part (as defined by the cognizant vice president, vice provost, dean or designee) of the actual or incremental expenses associated with temporary living arrangements while relocating near the University may be reimbursed.

b. Procedure
See section 4, House-Hunting Expenses.

Tax Note: All temporary living expenses are tax reportable, except for the day of departure from the old location and day of arrival in the new location.

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7. Moving of Household and Personal Effects

a. Policy
All or part of the actual and reasonable expenses of moving the household and personal effects of a new employee may be reimbursed. This policy also covers spouses/same-sex domestic partners and dependent children living at home. Where a mobile home is the principal place of residence, the University may reimburse the employee for expenses associated with unblocking, wheel rental, transportation, and resetting at the new location.

b. Procedure
In addition to the procedures outlined in section 4 (House-Hunting Expenses) above, the cognizant officer should specify the appropriate details in the letter of authorization. Unless there are unusual circumstances, a reasonable weight allowance is 15,000 pounds.

(1) Reimbursable Costs
The moving allowance may include:

  • The actual cost of packing, crating, transporting, unpacking, and uncrating household effects
  • Costs incurred for moves to and from storage
  • Storage costs (limited to 60 days)
    Tax Note: Tax-reportable after 30 days.
  • Costs of connecting and disconnecting household equipment
  • “All risk” replacement cost insurance (which should be arranged through the shipping agent or carrier)
  • Household pets

Tax Note: All relocation expenses are taxable, including airfare, meals/hotel/travel costs in transit, and domestic partner/spouse/family expenses.

(2) Non-reimbursable Costs
Moving allowances exclude such items as:

  • Animals (except for household pets)
  • Pleasure boats
  • Airplanes
  • Vacation trailers
  • Recreational vehicles
  • Canned, frozen and bulk foodstuffs
  • Building supplies
  • Plants
  • Storage sheds
  • Farm equipment
  • Firewood

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8. Moving of Laboratories

a. Policy
Moving of laboratory supplies and equipment is a Stanford business expense, not subject to IRS reporting.

b. Procedure
The letter of authorization should instruct the moving company to document the costs of packing, crating, transporting, uncrating, and unpacking laboratory effects separately from the costs of moving household effects.

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9. Auto Shipment

The vice president, vice provost, dean or designee may authorize all or part of the actual and reasonable expenses of moving two cars per household. The cars may be driven or shipped.

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10. Expenses for Return Trips to Former Residence

a. Policy
In a case where a new employee must return to his/her former residence to help with a move, or where the new employee is separated from his/her family for more than one month, the cognizant officer may authorize reimbursement for expenses relating to up to two trips to the employee's former residence.

b. Procedure
Any reimbursement should cover transportation costs only and should be confirmed in writing before the travel takes place. Receipts are required (see Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses.)

Tax Note: All expenses for return trips are tax reportable.

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11. Limited Assignment Expenses

a. Policy
The payment of expenses by the University may be authorized for faculty and regular staff with specifically limited assignments and for non-employees and distinguished visitors who perform teaching, research, or other related services. Limited assignments are for one calendar year or less and presuppose no change in permanent residence nor primary affiliation with another organization. All travel expense policies of the University (Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses) apply to limited assignments, with these points of clarification:

b. Expenses are reimbursable only to the extent authorized in a formal letter of authorization (invitation). Transportation expenses for dependents may be allowed at the discretion of the vice president, vice provost, dean or designee, but will not be allowed for an assignment of fewer than 30 days.

Tax Note: Limited assignment expenses are tax reportable unless these conditions occur:

  • The person on limited assignment has duplicate expenses (both the home residence and the limited assignment lodging).
  • A member of the person's family continues to live in the home residence.
  • The person retains a primary affiliation to the home institution (i.e., to Stanford for employees on limited assignment elsewhere, to their other employer for visitors to Stanford).
    Tax Note: Dependent expenses for a person on limited assignment are tax reportable.

c. Local transportation costs should be held to a minimum by the use of University vehicles and public transportation, but car rentals and taxi expenses are reimbursable when necessary and reasonable, to the extent authorized in the letter of authorization.

d. Reimbursement
The University will not reimburse expenses except those specifically detailed in the letter of authorization. Expenses reimbursed by other sources may not be included in the reimbursement request.

e. Lodging
While a person is seeking longer term suitable housing, payment by the University of actual and reasonable short term lodging costs or a per diem reimbursement is allowed, consistent with section 5 (En Route/Travel Expenses) of this Guide Memo. After suitable housing is obtained, a lodging allowance may be authorized if deemed necessary. A lodging allowance may be necessary if the employee has actual expenses greater than those incurred living in his/her primary residence. Any income from renting the primary residence while on temporary assignment must be considered in the lodging reimbursement calculation.

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12. Reassignment Expenses

If reassignment of a faculty or staff member for official University purposes requires relocation, the University may pay the actual, reasonable, and necessary costs incurred, as approved by the cognizant vice president, vice provost, dean, or designee, subject to a maximum agreed upon in writing in advance. Expense incurred in connection with sabbaticals (unless retained on salary by Stanford) and leaves of absence will not be reimbursed.

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13. Expense Advances

Where appropriate, the University may elect to advance a relocating employee an amount to cover anticipated expenditures. Such advances may cover only expenses reimbursable to the employee and must be made in accordance with Guide Memo 5.4.1, Expense Advances.

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14. Repayment Provisions

Faculty or staff members who receive relocation assistance to accept a Stanford position will be required to reimburse the University for relocation assistance if they voluntarily leave the University for any reason within 12 months from their date of hire. Reimbursement to the University will be pro-rated according to the number of months the employee has worked at Stanford. (For example, an employee who leaves after six months would be required to repay half the relocation allowance paid.) This repayment provision must be included in the offer letter.

Tax Note: Non-repayment of relocation allowances has tax implications.

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15. Reimbursement Procedures

a. Oracle Financials Reimbursement Request
To claim reimbursement for relocation expenses the individual should submit an online Expense Report the through the Oracle Financials Expense Requests system. For requirements on receipts and other documentation, see Guide Memo 5.4.2, Travel Expenses, section 14.

b. Accounting
Relocation expenses are coded to moving expense expenditure types. Most such costs are classified as allowable. However, if the employee voluntarily resigns within 12 months of hire, the net moving costs (that is, the portion not repaid) must be transferred to an unallowable moving expense expenditure type.

c. Tax Withholding
For reimbursements on which income tax and Social Security withholding are required at the time of payment, Travel and Reimbursement will arrange with the Payroll Office for payment to be made through the payroll process.

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2.1.20 Staff Telecommuting and Remote Working

Last updated on:
12/08/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
2.1.21

As technology has made it possible to be more flexible in the way we work together to achieve our mission, Stanford recognizes that some staff seek the option of telecommuting  on a regular, part-time basis.  In appropriate circumstances, this preference can be accommodated.  In addition, and also in appropriate circumstances, Stanford may hire or transition existing staff to work remotely. This guide memo sets forth policies and procedures to facilitate telecommuting and remote working arrangements for eligible employees in appropriate circumstances.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources

Applicability: 

Applies to all regular employees as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1 – General Employment Policies: Definitions. This policy does not apply to:

  • Casual or temporary employees
  • Employees covered by collective bargaining agreements
  • Faculty
  • Employees who are remotely working outside the U.S. See Guide Memo 12.2.22.
  • Employees telecommuting temporarily but for an extended period outside the U.S. See Guide Memo 12.2.21.

1. Policy Statement/Philosophy

The workplace culture at Stanford is one that is rooted in collaboration, continuous discourse about planned work and projects underway, and in providing stellar service to our faculty, students, patients, alumni and donors. With appropriate use of technology and managerial oversight, staff whose roles allow for some work hours to be performed away from their Regular Stanford Work Location may be eligible for telecommuting. (“Regular Stanford Work Location” is defined below in 2(a)). 

Though telecommuting might be a viable option for many eligible staff employees, it is not a right; it is an option that can be modified or revoked by Stanford at any time. Staff whose work cannot be performed at a location away from their Regular Stanford Work Location are not eligible to telecommute. Further, for a variety of operational reasons, telecommuting may not be extended to all employees who meet the minimum eligibility criteria described in Section 3 below. Decisions about the suitability of telecommuting are discretionary and typically made by the management (“Management”) in the school, department or business unit (“Department”) where the employee works, in consultation with local HR.

Agreements to requests to telecommute may be made when the arrangements are feasible, secure, reliable, effective, and meet Management’s goals and operational needs, all as determined in the discretion of Management. Management generally will determine the specific procedures for evaluating, approving or denying a telecommuting request in a manner consistent with this policy. At all times, telecommuting employees will have access to a fully equipped workspace at their Regular Stanford Work Location.

In addition, some Departments may have work conducive to hiring remote staff.  Remote employees are defined below in Section 2.  

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2. Definitions, Requirements and Obligations

a. Definitions

(1)  “Stanford Campus” means the Stanford historical campus and the Stanford Redwood City Campus.

(2)  “Stanford Alternative Work Location” means Stanford owned or leased premises, other than the Stanford Campus.

(3)  “Regular Stanford Work Location” means the Stanford Campus or Stanford Alternative Work Location designated by Stanford as the primary location at which the employee is generally expected to perform their work.

(4)  “Remote employee” means a Stanford employee who is approved, assigned, or designated by Stanford to work from a site other than the Stanford Campus or a Stanford Alternative Work Location as their primary work location.  This also includes an employee who is approved, assigned or designated by Stanford to telecommute on a full-time but temporary basis (more than 4 consecutive weeks) from a location other than the employee’s Regular Stanford Work Location.

(5)  “Telecommuting” means performing Stanford work on a regular, part-time basis from a location other than the employee’s Regular Stanford Work Location, provided the location is not the Stanford Campus or a Stanford Alternative Work Location. 

b. Telecommuting Requirements and Obligations

(1)  After approval by departmental management, a telecommuting employee must sign the current form of Telecommuting Agreement and any other agreements and documents the Department or university may require.  The Telecommuting Agreement should be reviewed periodically but no less frequently than annually.

(2)  Departments must keep current records of the locations from which an employee telecommutes.  Such records must include the number of employees telecommuting from each city, county and state, the frequency each such employee telecommutes from such location, and the duration of the telecommuting on each such occasion.

(3)  Employees who are approved by their Department to telecommute are responsible to ensure, at their own expense, that their telecommuting worksite is ergonomically appropriate. Stanford resources exist to assist employees in making that determination, including the EHS 3400 training in STARS, the Computer Workstation Ergonomic Evaluation and the SU Work-At-Home Safety Checklist, all available on the Environmental & Health Safety (“EHS”) website at ehs.stanford.edu. Employees who do not have or are not able to provide themselves an ergonomically appropriate place to work should not telecommute and should work instead at their Regular Stanford Work Location.

(4)  Travel between an employee’s home and any telecommuting location is considered part of an employee’s normal commute and is non-reimbursable. The university will continue to provide telecommuting employees with appropriate reimbursement for approved, Stanford-related business travel in accordance with its travel reimbursement policies.

c. Remote Working Requirements and Obligations

(1)  Remote working arrangements must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean, Senior Associate or Associate Vice Provost, or Vice President of the Department as well as the local senior human resources manager. All employees hired as or transitioned to a remote employee status must sign a current Remote Working Agreement (Note:  The general template for this Agreement is approved by Office of General Counsel (“OGC”) and substantive or significant changes may require OGC approval).

(2)  All Departments must keep current records of the locations from which an employee is remote working.  Such records must include the the city, county and state. Remote employees should update their location with the Department within five business days after changing the city, county and/or state from which they are working.  Remote employees must obtain approval from the Senior Associate Dean, Senior Associate or Associate Vice Provost, or Vice President of the Department, or their designee, as well as the local senior human resources manager if they wish to relocate their remote workspace to a different city, state and/or country prior to such relocation.

(3)  Remote employees are paid competitive rates based on the local economy for the geographic region where they work as determined by Management in consultation with University Human Resources--Staff Compensation, all as approved by OGC consistent with applicable laws.  The university may adjust salary rates for employees who become remote employees consistent with the foregoing. In addition, Management should review the provisions of Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.2, and Fingate with respect to out of state payroll for remote employees working in the U.S. but outside of California.

(4)  Generally, the university does not maintain an equipped workspace on the Stanford Campus or a Stanford Alternative Work Location for remote employees. Accordingly, Departments with remote employees are required to provide reasonable reimbursement for (and/or supply) the equipment, services and supplies deemed by the university to be reasonable and necessary to enable remote employees to perform their Stanford work, all in accordance with Stanford’s policies governing reimbursement of business expenses. 

(5)  Remote employees must be provided with appropriate reimbursement for approved, Stanford-related business travel in accordance with its travel reimbursement policies.

(6)  Remote Working arrangements may be discontinued at the discretion of Management or the Department for reasons and upon notice which the Department deems appropriate under the circumstances.  In such event, the Department may consider offering the remote employee the opportunity to work at the Stanford Campus or Stanford Alternative Work Location which the Department deems appropriate, but is under no obligation to do so. Nothing in this Administrative Guide Memo requires a Department to retain a remote employee whom the Department would otherwise terminate or lay off, consistent with university policies.

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3. Eligibility and Expectations

a.     Eligibility Factors for Telecommuting

Generally, Departments and Management should take into consideration, among other factors,  the nature of the job/work, operational needs, whether the Department can maintain the quality of their services to members of the university community (and public, if applicable), performance and productivity of the employee, attendance and the ability of the employee to work independently.  Typically, employees who have received discipline within the preceding twelve months and employees who have not completed at least six months of their trial period should not be considered eligible for telecommuting.

b.    Eligibility Factors for Remote Working

When considering whether remote working is appropriate, Departments and Management should take into consideration, among other factors, the nature of the work, costs described in this AGM above at 2.c.(4), whether the Department can maintain the quality of their services to members of the university community (and public, if applicable) with an employee in such role working remotely, and whether the work should or must be performed remotely.

When an existing employee wishes to transition to work remotely, Departments and Management should take into consideration applicable factors listed above, but also costs associated with travel that would not have been necessary had the employee continued working at their Regular Stanford Work Location, performance and productivity of the employee, the challenges associated with replacing the employee locally, and the ability of the employee to work independently.

c.     General Expectations for Telecommuting and Remote Working

(1)  Telecommuting/Remote Working is not intended to permit staff to have time to work at other jobs, provide dependent or other care during work hours, or run their own businesses. Engagement in any such activities during expected work time may result in immediate termination of the telecommuting agreement/remote working agreement and/or possible corrective action (including potential termination of employment).

(2)  Compliance: Employees who telecommute or work remotely must comply with all Stanford policies and procedures, including adequately safeguarding and securing any restricted or confidential information (including PHI) with which they work in accordance with applicable law as well as Stanford and the Department’s policies and procedures. This may include encryption of all computer equipment used in the performance of Stanford work.  Failure to fulfill work requirements, both qualitative and quantitative, may result in revocation of telecommuting, disciplinary action, or termination of employment.

(3)  Work Schedule: Employees who telecommute or work remotely are expected to have regularly-scheduled and approved work hours (determined by the Department), to be fully accessible during those hours, and to attend meetings and functions in person (some of which may be on the Stanford Campus or Stanford Alternative Work Locations) as may be required, including on days they, if telecommuting, would customarily telecommute. Non-exempt employees who are approved to telecommute or work remotely are required to strictly adhere to required rest and meal breaks, and to accurately report their work hours. Details concerning timing and duration of required rest and meal breaks are set forth in Administrative Guide Memo 2.1.5.  Non-exempt employees must obtain prior approval before working any overtime.

(4)  Telecommuting and remote working arrangements end no later than at the employee’s termination, including for employees who leave Stanford University for Stanford University Hospital or the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford.  A telecommuting arrangement may be discontinued at any time prior to termination of employment in the university or Management’s sole discretion, or at the request of the telecommuting employee.  A remote working arrangement may be discontinued at any time prior to termination of employment for reasons and upon notice which is deemed appropriate by the university in the university or Management’s sole discretion.  

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4. Guide to Supervisors

Supervisors and managers have several key resources available when considering telecommuting or remote work situations, or when hiring a remote worker, including:

(1) The Department Human Resources Manager, who can guide Management through the required approvals and process.

(2) University Employee & Labor Relations (“ELR”), who can provide counsel on flexible work options.  ELR can be reached at stanfordelr@stanford.edu or 650-721-4272.

(3) Environmental Health & Safety, who can guide you on the ergonomic and safety issues.

(4) Global HR, who can guide Human Resources Managers (HRMs) and Management when an employee requests to work outside of the US.  Global HR can be reached at globalhrprograms@stanford.edu or 650 497-4339.

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2.1.21 Sick Time for Temporary and Casual Staff Employees

Last updated on:
12/09/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
2.1.22

This Guide Memo describes paid sick time accrual and usage policies for temporary and casual staff employees.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo is approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all casual and temporary staff employees as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. In this Guide Memo, these casual and temporary staff employees are referred to as “contingent employee(s).”

1. Accrual

  1. Eligibility

Contingent employees delineated in the Applicability section above accrue and use sick time as described below.

  1. Accrual of Sick Time
  • Contingent employees accrue sick time at the rate of .03334 hours per hour of straight time. This equates to one (1) hour for every 30 hours worked.
  • Unused sick time accumulates from year-to-year, with a maximum limit of 48 hours or six (6) days.
  • When a contingent employee leaves one position and accepts another one within the University, the contingent employee retains his/her sick time balance; the contingent employee is subject to any policies applicable to the new position regarding sick time use and limits on sick time accruals. 
  • If a contingent employee separates from the University and is rehired by the University within 12 months from the date of separation, previously accrued and unused paid sick days shall be reinstated.
  • Sick time shall not be paid out upon separation of employment.

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2. Use of Sick Time

Contingent employees may begin using sick time on the 90th calendar day after the start of employment with the University. Sick time must be accrued before it can be used. The use of sick days is limited to 24 hours or three (3) scheduled work days each year of employment, whichever is greater. Sick time may only be used for an absence that a contingent employee has during scheduled work hours.

Sick time may be used for the following reasons:

a. Absence Due to Illness or Injury

Sick time may be used when a contingent employee’s illness or injury prevents the contingent employee from working.

   b. Medical and Dental Appointments

   Sick time may be used for all medical and dental appointments, including: 

  • Diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition
  • Preventative care
  • Those appointments associated with a work injury (e.g., physical therapy)

   c. Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking

Sick time may be used by a contingent employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking in order to:

  • Obtain or attempt to obtain any relief, including, but not limited to, a temporary restraining order, restraining order, or other injunctive relief, to help ensure the health, safety, or welfare of the victim or his or her child
  • Seek medical attention for injuries caused by domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Obtain services from a domestic violence shelter, program, or rape crisis center as a result of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Obtain psychological counseling related to an experience of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Participate in safety planning and take other actions to increase safety from future domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including temporary or permanent relocation

   d. Family Sick Time

Contingent employees may use sick time for diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition of, or preventive care for, a contingent employee's family member. For the purpose of this policy, family member includes only the contingent employee's:

  • Spouse or registered domestic partner
  • Children of the contingent employee or spouse or registered domestic partner (including a biological, adopted, or foster child, stepchild, legal ward, or a child to whom the contingent employee stands in loco parentis, regardless of the child’s age or dependency status)
  • Parents and parents-in-law (including a biological, adoptive, or foster parent, stepparent, or legal guardian of a contingent employee or the contingent employee’s spouse or registered domestic partner, or a person who stood in loco parentis when the contingent employee was a minor)
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Grandparents or grandchildren
  • Other family member dependent on the contingent employee and living in the contingent employee's household

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3. Administration

a. Notification of Absence

The contingent employee reports an absence (or planned absence) to the supervisor. The department is responsible for establishing and communicating rules on how contingent employees notify the department of absences. If the need for sick time use is foreseeable, the contingent employee shall provide reasonable advance notice. If the need for sick time use is unforeseeable, the contingent employee shall provide notice of the need for sick time use as soon as practicable. If a contingent employee has accrued sick time available and has not reached applicable limits of sick time use per year of employment, a request to use sick time should not be denied because details are not provided about the sick time use. Contingent employees may be asked to schedule appointments at a time convenient for the department. Where flexible schedules work for the department, supervisors are encouraged to accommodate appointments by flexing a contingent employee’s work hours.

b. Recording and Reporting Sick Time Accumulation and Use

The University uses the human resources management system (Axess/PeopleSoft HRMS) to record sick time credited, used, and accumulated for all contingent employees. Contingent employees record hours of sick time used in the Axess Timecard each pay period. The use of sick time is limited to 24 hours (or three scheduled workdays, whichever is greater) during each year of employment. Up to 24 hours of sick time use may be recorded in Axess; if a contingent employee has three scheduled work days of sick time use that exceeds 24 hours, the contingent employee should request assistance from the local Human Resources Office. Contingent employees are not paid for time spent away from work in excess of the sick time limit per year of employment, and such time is not recorded in Axess. (For information about Axess, see the Time & Leave System overview.)

c. Sick Time Credit Date

Sick time is credited at the beginning of each month of service, calculated based upon work hours recorded during the previous month. If a contingent employee needs to use sick time that has been accrued but not yet credited in Axess, the contingent employee should speak to the local Human Resources Office for assistance.

d. Tax Status

Sick time is taxable income. Federal, state and FICA taxes are deducted.

e. Medical Confirmation

(1) Medical Confirmation Related to Use of Sick Time

Acceptable medical evidence may be required for the use of sick time. However, for a contingent employee’s use of the first 24 hours of sick time (or three scheduled work days, whichever is greater) during each year of employment, excepting circumstances involving abuse or misuse of sick time as stated in subpart (2) below, supervisors may not require acceptable medical evidence, and supervisors should not deny sick time use based on a contingent employee’s failure to provide details about the sick time use. The supervisor who approves the use of sick time is responsible for confirming that the conditions for use of sick time are met.

(2) Medical Confirmation Related to Possible Abuse or Misuse of Sick Time

If the University has reasonable basis to believe that a contingent employee may have engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time at any time (even during the first 24 hours or three scheduled workdays of sick time use during each year of employment), the University may ask for acceptable medical evidence or other proof showing that a contingent employee has not engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time. Abuse or misuse of sick time, failure to follow sick time notification procedures (e.g., failing to provide reasonable advance notice for foreseeable sick time use, not providing requested medical information when abuse or misuse is suspected, or not giving notice as soon as practicable for unforeseeable sick time use) may be a basis for discipline, up to and including termination of employment. Also, use of sick time may be denied if there is abuse or misuse of sick time.

(3) Acceptable Medical Evidence

Acceptable medical evidence includes, but is not limited to, a healthcare practitioner’s statement that certifies a medical need for sick time, the expected duration of absence and anticipated return to work date, and any work-related limitations or restrictions (including the duration of those limitations or restrictions) when the contingent employee is released to return to work.

f. Sources of Funds for Sick Time

As sick time is used to replace scheduled work hours, it should be recorded in Axess on the timecard associated with the job for which the work time was scheduled. Sick time used is charged to the department that owns this job record.

g. Applicable Laws

The intent of this Guide Memo 2.1.22 is to meet or exceed requirements of all applicable laws, including, without limitation, the California Paid Sick Leave Law enacted by Assembly Bill 1522.

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4. Disability Insurance and Family Temporary Disability

a. Voluntary Disability Insurance (VDI) and Short Term Disability (STD)

The VDI and STD plans provide partial income continuation for periods of disability. Stanford’s VDI and STD plans are administered by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, and there are specific rules regarding disability insurance benefits, including rules about eligibility and duration. For more information, contingent employees should contact their supervisors, the applicable local Human Resources office, or contact the University HR Service Team; they also may contact Liberty Mutual Insurance Company at (800) 896-9375 or submit a claim at www.mylibertyconnection.com (claimant service ID: stanford).

b. Family Temporary Disability (FTD)

FTD provides partial income replacement to care for seriously ill family members or to bond with a new child. Stanford’s FTD plan is administered by Liberty Mutual Insurance Company, and there are specific rules regarding the FTD benefit, including rules about eligibility. For more information, contingent employees should contact their supervisors, the applicable local Human Resources office, or contact the University HR Service Team; they also may contact Liberty Mutual Insurance Company at (800) 896-9375 or submit a claim at www.mylibertyconnection.com (claimant service ID: stanford).     

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2.2.1 Definitions

Last updated on:
09/19/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
2.2.2, 23.1

"General Personnel Policies" has been re-named to "Equal Employment Opportunity, Non-Discrimination, and Affirmative Action Policy" is now located at 1.7.4.

This Guide Memo defines various types of academic and non-academic employees, and other groups who have a specified relationship with the University.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

Applies to faculty, staff, students and others who have relationships with the University. For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining

1. Professoriate

The Professoriate consists of the tenure line professoriate, the non-tenure line professoriate, and the Medical Center Line. Appointments to the Professoriate require approval by the department chair, school dean, Provost, Advisory Board of the Academic Council, and the President of the University.

a. Tenure Line Professoriate
Professor, Associate Professor, Assistant Professor. Members of the Tenure Line Professoriate are members of the Academic Council. Professors are normally appointed with tenure; i.e., without limit of time. Associate Professors may be appointed either for a term of years or with tenure. Assistant Professors are appointed for a term of years. Individuals appointed to the rank of Assistant Professor with a "Subject to Ph.D." contingency are not members of the Academic Council until official confirmation of completion of Ph.D. requirements is received.

b. Non-tenure Line Professoriate
Professor or Associate Professor followed by the parenthetical designation (Clinical), (Performance), (Research), or (Teaching); Assistant Professor (Research); and Professor (Applied Research). The "Performance" designation is used in the fine arts, "Clinical" in the Medical School, and "Applied Research" at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). Members of the non-tenure line professoriate are members of the Academic Council.

c. Medical Center Line
Professor, Associate Professor, or Assistant Professor of "Subject" at "a specified Medical Center," such as the Stanford University Medical Center or the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Faculty in the Medical Center Line are voting members of the Faculty Council of the Medical School but are not members of the Academic Council. They are eligible to vote on departmental and school matters according to departmental and school policies, and to serve on faculty committees, except for those specifically reserved for Academic Council members.

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2. Academic Appointments in Specified Policy Centers and Institutes

a. Senior Fellow
Senior Fellows at specified policy centers and institutes are members of the Academic Council. Their appointments are for a specific period of time or for a continuing term (subject to programmatic need and/or funding) and are not in the tenure line. (Note: Senior Fellows at the Hoover Institution are not members of the Academic Council. Their appointments require different procedures.)

b. Center Fellow
Center Fellows are not members of the Academic Council. Appointments are for a specific period, renewable, and contingent on programmatic need and/or funding.

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3. Academic Staff

Non-professorial academic staff is comprised of the teaching staff (Lecturers, Senior Lecturers, PWR Advanced Lecturer, and Artists-in-Residence), research staff (Research Scientists, Senior Research Scientists, Senior Research Engineers, Senior Research Scholars) and Professional Librarians (Assistant Librarian, Associate Librarian, Librarian, and Senior Librarian). These appointments are made for a specific period of time, for a continuing term (subject to satisfactory performance, programmatic need, or financial support), or for the duration of an administrative appointment or project. Procedures for Academic Staff-Teaching appointments are established by the Provost's Office. Procedures for Academic Staff-Research are established by the Office of the Dean of Research. Academic staff are not members of the Academic Council.

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4. Other Teaching Titles

Appointments to the following positions require approval of the department chair and school dean. These appointments may be for a specific period of time or for a continuing term (subject to programmatic need and/or funding), with or without salary, and for various percentages of time. Other Teaching Title appointees are not members of the Academic Council. Individuals in any of the following categories who teach academic courses for credit and who receive compensation from Stanford must be Stanford employees, paid through normal payroll procedures.

a. Acting Professor, Acting Associate Professor, Acting Assistant Professor, Acting Instructor

b. Visiting Professor, Visiting Associate Professor, Visiting Assistant Professor, Visiting Instructor, Visiting Lecturer

c. Adjunct Professor and Adjunct Lecturer

d. Adjunct Clinical Professor, Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Adjunct Clinical Instructor
See Voluntary Clinical Appointments and Faculty Handbook Chapter 6: Adjunct Clinical Faculty

e. (By Courtesy) Appointments

f. Teaching Specialist

g. Instructor Role

h. Clinician Educator Role

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5. Postdoctoral Scholars, Postdoctoral Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Affiliates (Postdocs)

A Stanford postdoctoral scholar is a non-matriculated trainee, in graduate student status, in residence at Stanford University pursuing advanced studies beyond the doctoral level in preparation for an independent career. Postdoctoral Scholars are appointed for a limited period of time and may participate on Stanford research projects and/or may be supported by external awards or fellowships. In all cases, their appointment at Stanford is for the purpose of advanced studies, research, and training under the mentorship of a Stanford faculty member. For more information, see the Research Policy Handbook.

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6. Visiting Scholars

Guests of the University who are pursuing individual research or other scholarly activities. Visiting scholars must hold a doctoral degree (or be a recognized expert in his or her field) and be from an outside institution or organization. "Visiting scholars" do not receive compensation or benefits provided for students, faculty, or staff. They are sponsored by schools or academic departments and have certain courtesy privileges.

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7. Staff Employees

Individuals on the University payroll who are not Stanford students, faculty, academic staff, other teaching staff or postdoctoral research affiliates. "Staff employees" are subject to appointment procedures and terms set forth in memos of the Administrative Guide or applicable collective bargaining agreements. Clinician/Educators and Instructors are staff employees subject to the terms set in the Administrative Guide memos except that procedures for appointments, pay and grievance review are established by the Dean of the School of Medicine.

For more information about Clinician/Educators and Instructors, see:
http://med.stanford.edu/academicaffairs/CEs/,
http://generalsurgery.stanford.edu/academicaffairs/handbook/chapt8_TOC.html, and
https://med.stanford.edu/academicaffairs/administrators/handbook/chapt5.html

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8. Regular Employees

Employees have "regular" status when appointed at 50% FTE or more for at least six consecutive months, or as described in the applicable collective bargaining agreement. Regular status is a requirement for most health and welfare benefit plans and programs. In the Administrative Guide, "benefits-eligible" refers to regular employees who are eligible for University sponsored health and welfare benefits.

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9. Casual Employees

Employees on the University payroll appointed less than 50% FTE and work no more than 980 hours during the calendar year for all job assignments. [Note: Departments may elect a discretionary limit of less than 980 hours based on their business need.] Once a casual employee reaches the 980-hour limit, the position should be posted and filled as a regular, benefits-eligible employee on the University payroll for any further work in the same calendar year. An individual should not be hired or rehired into a casual position if it can reasonably be anticipated that the assignment will result in the employee working 980 hours or more in a calendar year as a casual (or temporary) employee.

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10. Temporary Employees

Employees on the University payroll appointed at 50% FTE or more for no longer than six consecutive months and work no more than 980 hours during the six-month period for all job assignments. [Note: Departments may elect a discretionary limit of less than 980 hours based on their business need.] Once a temporary employee reaches the 980-hour limit, the position should be posted and filled as a regular, benefits-eligible employee on the University payroll for any further work in the same calendar year. An individual should not be hired or rehired into a temporary position if it can reasonably be anticipated that the assignment will result in the employee working 980 hours or more in a calendar year as a temporary (or casual) employee.

Important Notes on CASUAL and TEMPORARY Employees:

a. If duties are technical, maintenance, or service, employees may be appointed at 50% FTE or more for no longer than four consecutive months.

b. Temporary and casual employees are not regular employees. Temporary or casual employees are considered "at-will” for the duration of their employment. This means that employment can be terminated by either the employee or the university at any time and for any reason, or no reason, with or without notice.

c. An individual may be hired in a regular benefits-eligible position at any time after reaching the 980-hour maximum, as long as he/she meets all employment requirements. Admin Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting and Hiring of Regular Staff, outlines information about employment preference provided to temporary or casual staff.

d. Temporary and casual employees are not guaranteed a particular number of hours per week or duration of assignment.

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11. Stanford Student Employees

Employees who are registered Stanford students have "student" status excepting those whose employment is totally independent of and unrelated to their Stanford student role. Stanford students who are not currently registered are considered casual or temporary employees.

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12. Exempt Employees

All University employees, including students, faculty, and staff are subject to federal and state requirements regarding minimum wages, payment for overtime work, and related record keeping. However, employees may be exempt from the overtime pay and record keeping requirements when they occupy bona fide professional, managerial, or executive positions. At Stanford, "exempt" positions typically include executive officers, faculty, academic staff, other teaching staff, and certain professional, administrative, and executive staff. The Vice President of Human Resources, in accordance with provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and regulations of the U.S. Department of Labor determines exempt status.

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13. Non-exempt Employees

These are the employees who are not "exempt" under federal and state overtime regulations. They must receive compensation for overtime work.

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14. Salary Basis of Compensation

A "salary," as distinguished from an "hourly wage" is compensation established by the month (e.g. $1,000 per month) with the amount remaining the same each month without regard to the variations from month to month in the normal number of working hours (e.g., in 2010 a salaried full-time employee received the same salary for January with 184 working hours and for February with 160 working hours.)

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15. Hourly Basis of Compensation

Compensation established on an hourly basis, so that pay varies with the actual number of hours worked (or on paid leave) in each pay period.

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16. Pay Period

Each month has two pay periods: The first day of the month through the 15th and the 16th through the last day of the month. Paychecks are issued on the workday that falls on or immediately prior to the seventh calendar day after the end of each pay period.

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17. Staff Benefits

Plans and programs made available by the University for the benefit of faculty and staff. Included are legally required programs such as Social Security and short-term disability insurance, as well as University programs such as health plans, personal and life insurance, disability income plans, education and training plans, retirement income plans, and recreation facilities.

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18. Term (Duration of Employment)

All faculty and staff have one of the following appointment terms:

a. Continuing
Without a specified duration or time limit.

b. Fixed-term
Employees who meet the definition of regular staff employees and appointed for a fixed duration with a specified ending date. Fixed-term employees are subject to University policies applicable to regular staff except as those policies may be modified by the specific terms of their fixed-term offer letters or other written employment contracts or agreements.

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19. Base Pay

Base Pay is the hourly rate or monthly salary paid for a job performed. It does not include any premium pay, e.g., overtime, shift differentials, supplemental pay, or any pay element other than the base rate.

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20. Regular Pay

Regular Pay is the hourly rate or monthly salary paid for a job performed, including any premium pay, e.g., shift differentials, supplemental pay, or any pay element other than the base rate.

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2.2.2 Out-of-State Employees

Last updated on:
12/14/2012
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
2.2.12, 23.11

This Guide Memo presents policy for hiring and/or reassigning out-of-state employees. 

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all Stanford University employees, including SLAC and employees covered by collective bargaining unit agreements.

1. Definition

An "out-of-state employee" is defined as an employee of Stanford University whose primary work site is located outside the state of California. All individuals defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, are considered employees for the purpose of this Guide Memo. Consultants and contractors are not covered by this Memo.

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2. Policy

a. Applicable laws
Employees outside the state of California and Stanford University as their employer are subject to all employment-related laws of the state or foreign nation in which they work.

State taxes, employment tax, and workers compensation provisions vary from state to state. University Payroll is primarily responsible for compliance with these various rules. Therefore, departments must notify Payroll immediately of any prospective arrangements involving Stanford employees outside the state of California by submitting a HelpSU ticket (Category: Financial Management, Request Type: Payroll).

The existence of Stanford University employees in a state outside California may trigger additional compliance requirements besides those relating to employment. Therefore, the hiring or reassignment of employees to positions outside California must be supported by an important University business purpose and not be merely an accommodation to the employee.

b. Approval
Approval of the hire or reassignment must be obtained in advance in writing from the responsible Vice Provost, Vice President (or similar level equivalent to the highest administrative person within the organizational unit), or his/her designee, identifying the key University business reasons for the assignment.

c. Payroll
Notify University Payroll of the out-of-state assignment in advance of the start of work outside of California by sending a completed Approval of Out-of-State Employee Approval form to the Payroll Office. 

d. Administrative costs
Administrative costs per capita for out-of-state employees are high due to the extraordinary costs to assure compliance and, in some cases, liability for unemployment and disability benefits. Therefore, a one-time $500 fee is charged to the assigning department for each new out-of-state employee on payroll, to be assessed when the assignment begins. Departments are also charged $200 each year for each out-of-state employee. Failure to report out-of-state employees to University Payroll in a timely manner may result in compliance penalties, which will be assessed to the assigning department.

e. Benefits
The choices of health and welfare benefits plans may be more limited for employees who work outside of the Bay Area. You can find more information at https://cardinalatwork.stanford.edu/benefits-rewards.

f. When Employee Works in California
Notify University Payroll of any days that the out-of state employee is present in California on Stanford business. Compensation earned on such days is considered California-sourced taxable income regardless of employee’s state of residence and is subject to all California tax provisions. Use the Out-of-State Employee Days Worked in California form to report annually the number of days an out-of-state worker works in California.

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3. For More Information

Contact University Payroll by submitting a HelpSU ticket (Category: Financial Management, Request Type: Payroll).

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2.2.3 University Payroll

Last updated on:
02/11/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
35

This Guide Memo contains general policies concerning the university payroll. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) currently applies the applicable policies contained herein. SLAC departments should consult SLAC Business Services Division for SLAC procedures.

Authority: 

Approved by the Senior Associate Vice President for Finance.

1. Employer/Employee Relationship

Whether an individual is a university employee or an independent contractor is a determination with important practical and legal consequences.

a. General Rule
Federal tax rules define an employee as an individual who performs services subject to control by an employer both as to what services shall be performed and how they shall be performed. If the university has the legal right to control both the method and result of services, that person is considered an employee and therefore subject to income tax withholding.

b. Questions on Employee or Independent Contractor Status
In cases of doubt about an individual's status, contact Human Resources or Procurement/Special Contracts for advice. See "Hiring Contractors and Consultants".

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2. Employment Categories

Employees are categorized within the payroll system according to the length of the appointment, the percentage of time worked, and the type of position they fill. These categories in combination affect eligibility for most employment benefits.

a. Length of Appointment
(1) Continuing
Continuing employees are expected to remain on the payroll for six months or more (four months or more for Bargaining Unit employees).
(2) Temporary
Temporary employees are expected to remain on the payroll for less than six months (less than four months for Bargaining Unit employees). Stanford students working less than 50% time may be appointed for the entire academic year as temporary employees. Temporary employees are not eligible for employment benefits.

b. Scope of Appointment
The percentage of a full-time equivalent position (% FTE) an employee works affects both eligibility and level of benefits. See Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, for the % FTE of a continuing appointment that grants "regular employee" status and eligibility for most benefit plans and programs.

c. Type of Position
The job classification defines whether the position is:
(1) Salaried or Hourly-Paid

  • Salaried employees are paid their semi-monthly salary (less authorized deductions) every pay period unless an exception (such as authorized overtime hours or leave without pay) is reported. Subject to exceptions, the gross salary amount of the paycheck is the same for each pay period, regardless of the number of working days in the period.
  • Hourly-paid employees are paid for actual hours worked (less authorized deductions) as shown on a timecard submitted for the pay period.

(2) Exempt or Non-exempt
See the definitions in Guide Memo 2.2.1. Employees who are exempt from the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act are not paid overtime.

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3. Compliance with Employment Law

a. Documentation of Eligibility for Employment
(1) Completing Form I-9
All new and rehired employees must complete a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Form I-9 by the end of the day on their first day of (re) employment, and provide appropriate original document(s) to establish identity and work authorization. The hiring department, or other university designee, must review the original document(s) and complete the employer portion of this form within three business days of the first day of employment. Employers cannot specify which document(s) the employee must present. Completed forms are submitted to Payroll for review and document retention.
(2) Updating Form I-9
Eligibility to work in the U.S. may expire for certain types of temporary visitors. Documentation of continued eligibility to work must be provided before the work eligibility expiration date.
(3) Re-verifying Form I-9
A new or re-verified Form I-9 must be completed after any break in employment. Students who are continuously employed, except during normal school break periods, are not subject to the re-verification requirement.
(4) Failure to Complete/Update Form I-9
Failure to comply with USCIS Form I-9 requirements will result in ineligibility for employment and/or immediate termination.

b. Tax Requirements
(1) Withholding Tax Information
New employees must complete a withholding declaration at hire. In the absence of a completed withholding declaration, withholding tax will be applied as if the employee had claimed "Single" status with no withholding allowances on their W-4 and DE-4.
(2) Tax Treaties
Some employees who are not residents of the U.S. may qualify for full or partial exemption from withholding tax based on tax treaties between the U.S. and their country of tax residence. Texts of most treaties (in both English and the language of the other country) are available from the IRS website. For more information and to obtain the necessary documents to claim a tax treaty, see How to: Claim Tax Treaty for Salary Payments.
(3) Social Security Number
A Social Security number is required for all employees working in the U.S. Employees who do not already have a Social Security Number may begin employment, but must immediately apply for a Social Security Number and obtain a receipt of application. Once received, the hiring department must enter the Social Security Number in the PeopleSoft HR system.

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4. Payroll Accounting

a. Semimonthly Payroll
University employees are paid semimonthly. Pay periods are the 1st through 15th and the 16th through the last day of the month.

b. Salary Approvals
Department heads or other authorized university officers approve charges of salaries and wages to their projects, tasks and awards (PTAs) in accordance with budgets, compensation policies and collective bargaining agreements. In addition to the department head, certain offices have responsibility for reviewing salaries and wages for specific categories of employees. Salary changes, supplementary compensation, salary during leave of absence and termination of salary require the same authorization and review. Supervisors (or, in their absence, designees with first-hand knowledge of employees work hours) are responsible for approving employee timecards, including leave usage for exempt and non-exempt employees and work hours for non-exempt employees.

  • Faculty and Academic Staff: Salaries for faculty and academic staff are reviewed and approved by the cognizant dean and the Provost's Office.
  • Salaried Staff: Salaries for staff employees are established, reviewed and approved by the cognizant dean, director or equivalent university officer. In some cases, review by Human Resources is also required.
  • Hourly-paid Staff: Hourly wages are reviewed and approved by Human Resources.
  • Students: See Undergraduate Student Wage Scales, Guide Memo 10.2.1: Graduate Student Assistantships, and the Graduate Student Assistantship Supplement.

c. Charges to Projects, Tasks and Awards
Financial Management Services (FMS) charges salary and wage expenditures to PTAs designated by the department. Charges are reported on monthly expenditure or detail reports. Departmental staff provides the charging instructions through "Labor Schedules" in the Oracle Financials Labor Distribution module. Training and signature of a Confidentiality Statement is required.
(1) Multiple Activities/Accounts
If an employee is paid from more than one PTA, the authorized portion of salary or wage is allocated to the appropriate PTA. The paycheck or bank deposit advice delivered to the employee combines all earnings into one check.
(2) Organization Suspense Account
Each department designates an unrestricted PTA as an Organization Suspense Account to which salaries of department employees are charged whenever the source of salary funding (such as a grant or contract) runs out and is not immediately replaced by alternative funding. Charges to Organization Suspense Account PTAs, which are charged to the expenditure type 51610, should be reviewed on a timely basis to determine if transfers are needed. See Guide Memo 3.2.2: Cost Transfers.

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5. Taxes on Salaries and Wages

a. Taxable Earnings
The university withholds Federal, State, and other applicable taxes from all taxable earnings paid to employees. Taxable earnings include regular pay, overtime pay, supplementary compensation and any additional and miscellaneous payments for work performed for the university. This may also include taxable reimbursements. See Guide Memo 5.4.3: Reimbursable Expenses for additional details on taxable reimbursements.

b. W-2 Statements
At the end of each tax year (January 1 through December 31), Stanford compiles and distributes a W-2 Statement for each employee. As a default, W-2 Statements are mailed to the employee's mailing address on file with the university. Employees may elect to have their W-2 Statement sent to them electronically in the Axess portal. The university also sends Form W-2 data, as required, to Federal and State governments.

c. Tax Exemptions
Employees may not claim more withholding allowances than those allowed by the Internal Revenue Service or Franchise Tax Board. Fewer allowances may be claimed or additional dollar amount of taxes may be withheld if an employee wishes to increase the amount of tax withheld. Information about completing the IRS W-4 form and Franchise Tax Board form DE-4, used to specify withholding allowances, is located at How to: Declare or Change Withholding Allowances

d. Student Employees
Students who take jobs with the university while pursuing their studies are paid through the university payroll. Degree-seeking Stanford student employees, who are employed while enrolled in classes, do not pay Social Security taxes or Disability Insurance.

e. Scholarships and Fellowships
Scholarship and fellowship payments are not considered payments for work performed and the recipients are not placed in an employer-employee relationship because of receipt of this money from the university.

f. Research and Teaching Assistants
Research and teaching assistantships are taxable, and tax is withheld from the semi-monthly salary.

g. Non-California Residents
All employees who physically work in California are treated as California residents for California tax purposes.

h. Tax Status of Non-U.S. Residents
Salaries and wages paid to non-residents of the U.S. fall under the tax laws of the United States and the State of California. The specific provisions of the tax laws, treaties, conventions, and determinations in regard to non-residents are handled by the Internal Revenue Service and the California Franchise Tax Board.

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6. Payroll Deductions

a. Deductions for Benefits
Employees eligible for benefits (e.g., regular staff, faculty) may pay the employee's share of the cost of some insurance programs and benefits by payroll deduction. For more information, go to the Cardinal at Work website.

b. Other Authorized Deductions
The university has authorized voluntary payroll deductions for payments to certain organizations (such as the Stanford Faculty Club). Any employee who wishes to use this procedure should make arrangements directly with the organization for which the deduction is authorized. That organization will send the authorization to Payroll.

c. Reporting Deductions
Deductions from each paycheck are itemized on the pay statement. The amounts deducted are sent to the designated organizations.

d. Cessation of Deductions
(1) Benefits
Payroll deductions for benefits cease during leaves of absence without pay. An employee on leave without pay will receive information from the university's leave administrator on how to pay for the employee's share of the costs for applicable insurance plans. Benefit deductions also stop when an employee's status changes to a non-benefits-eligible position (see Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions) and when employment terminates. At that time, terminated employees may call Stanford Benefits at (650) 736-2985 to determine when they can start the paperwork to receive payment from their retirement savings.
(2) Other Authorized Deductions
Payroll deductions arranged through an organization external to Stanford are available to all employees, and are not affected by a change in employment status. Such deductions cease during leaves of absence without pay, at termination of employment, or on retirement.

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7. Delivery of Checks and Bank Deposit Advices

a. Direct Deposit of Paychecks
Employees are encouraged to have their paychecks deposited directly into their bank accounts. Employees may use any bank, savings and loan or credit union that is a member of the Automated Clearing House and can accept electronic fund transfers. Direct deposit enrollment instructions are available at How to: Enroll/Update/Cancel Direct Deposit

b. Delivery of Semi-monthly Paychecks and Advices
Pay statements are provided for all employees electronically in the Axess portal. Payroll distributes live paychecks and paper pay statements through interdepartmental mail. Other employees who wish to receive a paper pay statement must select this option in the Axess portal.

c. Undelivered Checks
A paycheck for an absent employee may be held by the department until the employee's return, if the absence is for no longer than one pay period. The department can mail the check if requested by the employee. Checks returned by the Post Office should be forwarded to Payroll for handling. Paychecks issued in error must be returned to Payroll for cancellation and reversal of earnings from employee's W-2.

d. Stale-Dated Checks
Paychecks are negotiable for six months from date of issue. Stale-dated checks should be returned to Payroll for reissue. Funds from checks not cashed after one year from date of issue must be remitted to the State of California Unclaimed Property Bureau.

e. Delivery of Final Paycheck
An individual's final paycheck must include the total amount of salary or wages owed as of the date of termination. This includes all payments due, including accumulated, unused vacation leave, PTO and floating holiday, less authorized deductions. The department should contact Employee & Labor Relations in advance if questions arise.
(1) If the university initiates the termination, or if the employee initiates the termination and gives at least 72 hours notice, the final paycheck must be given to the employee on the date of termination.
(2) When an employee initiates the termination and gives less than 72 hours notice, the final paycheck is due to the employee within 72 hours after termination. Departments are responsible for making sure final paychecks are delivered to employees under the time limitations provided by law. A completed Termination Transaction must be submitted to Payroll in order to process the final paycheck. 

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8. Salary and Wage Calculations

a. Vacation Payment and Vacation Credit
Vacation earned but unused at termination is paid on the basis of the employee’s hourly rate at termination. For salaried employees at 100% FTE, the hourly rate is calculated by dividing the annual salary by 2080 (hours in a working year). If an employee leaves one position and accepts another position within the university, the employee retains his/her accumulated vacation accruals. (See Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations). For more information about the policy on accrual and use of vacation leave, contact Systems & Reporting Operations (SRO) in Financial Management Services (FMS). The Vacation Accrual template found at How to: Calculate Vacation Accrual can be used to calculate vacation when an employee terminates.

b. Partial Pay Period Pay Calculation
Pay for less than a full pay period for new or terminating salaried employees is calculated by dividing the annual salary by 2080 (hours in a working year) and multiplying that number by the number of days the employee actually worked, including adjacent holidays, in the pay period times 8 (assume 8 hours/day for a full-time exempt employee.) Holidays are counted as workdays when the employee works or is on paid leave (including vacation) both the day immediately preceding and the day following a holiday.

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9. Special Situations

a. Salary Advances
Under certain circumstances as described below, salary advances are available to regular staff employees who are not in bargaining units. (Find information on salary advances for Bargaining Unit members in the applicable agreement.)
(1) Vacation Advance
An employee scheduled to take vacation leave of at least 10 consecutive workdays outside San Francisco Bay Area, may request early payment of any regular paychecks that would be issued during that period.
(2) Emergency Advance
Only in an emergency and with the concurrence of his/her department, a regular employee may receive an advance of salary already earned in one pay period prior to the regular payday for that pay period. No more than two emergency advances for the same employee will be processed in a 12-month period.

b. Faculty Terminations
A faculty member leaving after completing the employment obligation but before the designated end date of his/her appointment may receive the balance of salary through a special processing procedure. If this option is exercised, the faculty member's status as an employee ends on the termination date. The termination date must not be later than the date of the final check.

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2.2.4 Violence in the Workplace

Last updated on:
12/15/2010
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
2.2.11, 23.9

This policy provides guidelines for responding to violence or threats of violence in the workplace, including all University locations.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President of Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all Stanford University employees, and to all individuals who, while not Stanford employees, perform work at Stanford for its benefit.

1. Policy

Stanford University strives to provide employees a safe environment in which to work; therefore, the University will not tolerate violence or threats of violence in the workplace. All weapons, as defined by California Penal Code, are banned from University premises unless written permission is given by Stanford Department of Public Safety. Employees who violate this policy will be subject to corrective action, including termination. Employees who intentionally bring false charges will also be subject to corrective action, including termination. Non-employee violations of this policy will be handled in accordance with applicable laws.

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2. Definitions

a. Acts of violence include any physical action, whether intentional or reckless, that harms or threatens the safety of another individual in the workplace.

b. A threat of violence includes any behavior that by its very nature could be interpreted by a reasonable person as an intent to cause physical harm to another individual.

c. Workplace includes all University locations and off-campus locations where faculty, staff, or student employees are engaged in University business.

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3. Procedures

a. General Roles and Responsibilities

(1) In general:

(a) Any person experiencing or observing imminent violence should call emergency services at 9-911 immediately.
(b) Any employee who believes a crime has been committed against him/her has the right to report that to the proper law enforcement agency.

(2) Employee:
Each employee:

(a) Should report any acts or threats of violence to his/her immediate supervisor, human resources manager (see the online directory of school/unit HR Managers), to Employee & Labor Relations (650) 723-2191 at SLAC (650) 926-5555, or to the nearest member of management. Such reports will be promptly and thoroughly investigated.
(b) Should notify his/her supervisor of any restraining orders against individuals that include the workplace.

(3) Supervisor:
The immediate supervisor's responsibilities are:

(a) To respond promptly to issues related to workplace safety.
(b) In the event of a potential or actual incident, contact the appropriate personnel including the local Human Resources Office/Employee and Labor Relations (650) 721-4272 and the Stanford Department of Public Safety (650) 723-9633, Medical Center Security (650) 723-7222, or SLAC Site Security (650) 926-5555.
(c) To promptly inform his/her supervisor, the local Human Resources Office/Employee and Labor Relations about any acts or threats of violence even if the situation has been addressed.
(d) In the event he/she is advised of a restraining order, contact the local Human Resources Office/Employee and Labor Relations.

(4) Human Resources Managers (HRMs)
Human resources managers are responsible to:

(a) Contact the appropriate Employee and Labor Relations Representative/Specialist as soon as possible when made aware of a violent act or threat of violence.
(b) Conduct investigations of situations as directed by the Employee and Labor Relations Representative/Specialist.

(5) Employee and Labor Relations staff

(a) Consult and advise management regarding concerns about violent and potentially violent employees or others.
(b) In the event of an act or threat of violence, determine the investigation process and coordinate with the assigned investigator. Work with management, legal counsel, and police/security to determine the appropriate action to be taken as needed.
(c) Gather and maintain University-wide information on workplace acts or threats of violence.

(6) Help Center Counselors [or (650) 723-4577]

(a) Provide confidential counseling services to any employee desiring assistance with situations relating to anger or threats or violence in the workplace.
(b) Provide educational, emotional support and consultation to groups and individuals who are victims, observers, or otherwise adversely affected by a violent incident or threat.
(c) Provide consultation to management on evaluating the potential for violence by employees.
(d) Provide initial assessment of violent or threatening employees and make an appropriate referral for clinical evaluation or treatment as needed.

(7) Police/Security

(a) The Stanford Department of Public Safety takes appropriate law enforcement actions.
(b) SLAC Site Security and Medical School Security notify and cooperate with all law enforcement agencies as appropriate.

(8) Threat Assessment Team

The University's Threat Assessment Team, (typically consisting of representatives from the Ombuds office, Human Resources, Office of the General Counsel, President's Office, CAPS, the Faculty and Staff Help Center, Vaden Health Center and the Department of Public Safety). This Team may coordinate the assessment of any situation where there is a concern for risk of potential threat or violence, and may provide additional assessment of situations to determine if further resources and actions are needed.

b. Threats of Violence: Responsibilities

(1) Any individual who experiences or observes a threat of violence should immediately report the incident to his/her supervisor, local Human Resources office, or the police.
(2) The supervisor or other person notified calls the appropriate local Human Resources Office or Employee and Labor Relations Representative as soon as possible.
(3) Local management should attempt to ensure the safety of other employees.
(4) Employee and Management Services, along with the supervisor, conduct an investigation of the alleged threat, including interviewing any witnesses.
(5) Based on the finding of the investigation, appropriate action, disciplinary or otherwise, is taken.

c. Acts of Violence Not Involving Injuries or Weapons: Responsibilities

(1) The employee should report the incident immediately to his/her supervisor, the local Human Resources Office, or the police.
(2) The supervisor or other person notified calls the local Human Resources Office HRM or Employee and Labor Relations Representative as soon as possible.
(3) Employee and Management Services or its designee coordinates, if appropriate, with the Help Center counselors for intervention, consultation, or referral for clinical evaluation or treatment.
(4) Employee and Management Services or its designee conducts an independent University investigation of the incident and, in conjunction with management, takes appropriate action, disciplinary or otherwise.

d. Acts of Violence Involving Injuries or Weapons: Responsibilities

(1) Any person observing an incident should call 9-911 first, then, if at the Medical School call Medical School Security (650) 723-7222, and if at SLAC call the SLAC Main Gate Security Officer (650) 926-5555, and then notify local management.
(2) Local management should attempt to ensure the safety of other employees.
(3) Management or employees should not intervene unless, in their best judgment, (a) the situation is too critical to wait for law enforcement officials and, (b) they believe intervention would be successful.
(4) Once Medical School Security, SLAC Site Security, or Stanford Department of Public Safety are notified, they coordinate with the appropriate law-enforcement agencies and assist in controlling the situation.
(5) Separate from any criminal investigation that the police may conduct, Employee and Management Services or its designee takes the lead for the University in conducting an independent investigation into the incident and, in conjunction with management, takes appropriate action, disciplinary or otherwise.
(6) If necessary, the Help Center counselors arrange to work with victims and observers of the incident.

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2.2.5 Requesting a Lactation Accommodation

Last updated on:
01/19/2018
Authority: 

Vice President for Human Resources

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all faculty, academic staff, other teaching staff, and staff employees.

Students and postdoctoral scholars with questions about lactation accommodations may contact the Title IX Office at titleix@stanford.edu or 650-497-4955.

1. Policy Summary

Stanford University supports the importance of health and bonding for parents nursing their infants. It is the policy of the university to follow all state and federal laws and regulations in this area, including California Labor Code (Sections 1030-1033) and Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). In promoting a family-friendly work environment and to ensure equality of access for employees who wish to breastfeed, the university will provide reasonable accommodations to enable employees to express breastmilk.

Lactation spaces are available to all members of the university community, including students, postdoctoral scholars, and third parties who participate in Stanford programs and activities. The WorkLife Office maintains a list of campus spaces that may be used for lactation.

All Stanford University affiliated nursing parents, including students and postdoctoral scholars, are encouraged to register for the Stanford Lactation Support Program. Additional resources for lactation support information and educational resources are available on Cardinal at Work at: worklife.stanford.edu

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2. Implementation and Responsibility

a. Employees: are responsible for notifying a supervisor as soon as a lactation accommodation is needed. It is recommended that an employee anticipating an accommodation discuss their needs with their supervisor before a family leave is taken, including the anticipated schedule and request to access an appropriate space. Requests from staff employees should be made to the supervisor or Human Resources Manager. Faculty, academic staff and other teaching staff should contact their Chair and departmental faculty affairs officer.

b. Supervisors: are responsible for receiving requests for a lactation accommodation, and in consultation with the Human Resources Manager, reviewing accommodation requirements, identifying appropriate space and schedule for the employee, and discussing the accommodation with the employee. In the case of faculty, academic staff and other teaching staff, the term ‘supervisor’ in this policy refers to the Department Chair.

c. Human Resources Managers: are responsible for advising supervisors of accommodation requirements and assisting supervisors in consultation with the building or facilities managers to identify appropriate space to accommodate the employee. To identify the local Human Resources office, call the appropriate number: Campus 650-721-4272; School of Medicine 650-497-2750; SLAC 650-926-2358.

d. Department Chairs and Departmental Faculty Affairs Officers: are responsible for receiving faculty, academic staff and other teaching staff requests for a lactation accommodation and, in consultation with the Human Resources Manager or departmental faculty affairs officer, reviewing accommodation requests and requirements, identifying appropriate space for the employee and discussing the accommodation with the employee.

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a. Step One – Request: Employees are responsible for initiating the request for a lactation accommodation. The request does not need to be made in writing, nor is a doctor’s note required. The employee should consider discussing a request with their supervisor or Human Resources Manager before taking a family leave.

b. Step Two – Discussion: When received, the supervisor or Human Resources Manager will meet with the employee to acknowledge the request and help develop an accommodation. The supervisor or Human Resources Manager should confirm that the employee has a private, clean and secure place to express breastmilk (see Section 6: Identifying Space). If the employee has questions or concerns about expressing breastmilk at work, questions should be referred to the Human Resources Manager or the WorkLife Office.

c. Step Three – Follow up: The supervisor or Human Resources Manager should confirm the accommodation in writing and offer to revisit the plan with the employee after two to three weeks to see if any changes are needed. 

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4. Accommodation Periods

An accommodation includes a reasonable amount of time taken as needed by the employee to express breastmilk in a space that complies with state and federal requirements (see Section 6: Identifying Space). When possible, time should be taken during regularly scheduled meal and rest periods. The number of breaks needed to express breastmilk may vary. A nursing parent will typically need two or three breaks during an eight-hour period; however, additional break times may be necessary. If the time to express breastmilk exceeds an employee’s regularly-scheduled meal or rest periods, non-exempt employees may request to be provided an opportunity to make up time per Admin Guide Memo 2.1.5. If no reasonable opportunity exists for a non-exempt employee to make up time, the time to express breastmilk that exceeds paid rest periods will not be paid. The break schedule should be based on the employee’s needs and the operational needs of the department.  

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5. Identifying Space

Appropriate space that complies with state and federal requirements includes any clean space that can be made private, shielded from view and free from intrusions from coworkers or the public, and is not located in a bathroom. Appropriate space can include a private office, a conference room with a locking door, or any other compliant space that can be secured and shielded from view.

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6. Employee's Own or Adjacent Building

Every effort should be made to identify space in the employee’s building when possible. It may be necessary to identify more than one space in order to meet the needs of both the employee and department. Space may be identified at an adjacent building within a reasonable walking distance and that is accessible to the employee during the arranged lactation schedule. A reasonable distance is recommended as no more than a 5-minute walk from the employee’s building. 

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7. Identified Lactation Locations

If space cannot be identified in the employee’s building or an adjacent building, the WorkLife Office maintains a list of campus spaces that may be used for lactation. 

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2.2.6 Smoke-Free Environment

Last updated on:
04/13/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
23.4
Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

Applies to all academic and administrative units of Stanford University, including SLAC and all campus student housing. This policy does not supersede more restrictive policies that may be in force to comply with federal, state, or local laws or ordinances. The President must approve more restrictive policies not required by law.

1. Policy

It is the policy of Stanford University that all smoking, including but not limited to tobacco products and the use of electronic smoking devices, is prohibited in enclosed buildings and facilities and during indoor or outdoor events on the campus.

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2. Definition

“Smoke-free” refers to an environment that is free of smoke from, among other things, tobacco products and/or vapors from electronic smoking devices.

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3. Guidelines

a. Smoking-Prohibited Areas
Specifically, smoking is prohibited in classrooms and offices, all enclosed buildings and facilities, in covered walkways, in University vehicles, during indoor or outdoor athletic events, during other University sponsored or designated indoor or outdoor events and in outdoor areas designated by signage as "smoking prohibited" areas.

  • Ashtrays will not be provided in any enclosed University building or facility.
  • "Smoking Prohibited" signs will be posted.

b. Outdoor Smoking Areas
Except where otherwise posted as a "smoking prohibited area," smoking is generally permitted in outdoor areas, except during organized events. Outdoor smoking in non-prohibited areas must be at least 30 feet away from doorways, open windows, covered walkways, and ventilation systems to prevent smoke from entering enclosed buildings and facilities. To accommodate faculty, staff and students who smoke, Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts and Deans may designate certain areas of existing courtyards and patios as smoking areas, and must provide ashtrays. The specific academic or administrative unit(s) will be responsible for absorbing all costs associated with providing designated smoking areas and ashtrays.

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4. Enforcement

This policy relies on the consideration and cooperation of smokers and non-smokers. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to observe and follow this policy and its guidelines.

a. Smoking Cessation Information
Smoking cessation programs are available for faculty and staff through the Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Health Improvement Program (HIP). Students may contact the Health Promotion Program (HPP) through the Student Health Center for smoking cessation information or programs.


b. Repeated Violations
Faculty, staff and students repeatedly violating this policy may be subject to appropriate action to correct any violation(s) and prevent future occurrences.

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5. Implementation and Distribution

This policy will be disseminated to all faculty, staff and students and to all new members of the University Community.

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2.2.7 Requesting Workplace Accommodations For Employees With Disabilities

Last updated on:
12/15/2011
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
23.5

This Guide Memo outlines Stanford University's policies and procedures for employee requests for disability-related accommodations.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all University employees, including SLAC. However, some procedures discussed here do not apply at SLAC. Employees should contact the SLAC Human Resources Department for information on how to request workplace accommodations.

1. Policy

Stanford University values diversity and is committed to provide equal employment opportunities to all qualified employees, including those with disabilities. The University follows all state and federal laws and regulations, including the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (CFEHA), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504). Disability is defined as any physical or mental impairment that limits one or more of an individual's major life activities (e.g., caring for oneself, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, sitting, standing). To ensure equality of access for employees with disabilities, the University will provide reasonable accommodations and auxiliary aids to enable the employee to perform the essential functions of his/her job and participate in University programs and activities.

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2. Implementation and Responsibility

a. Employees: are responsible for initiating requests for any desired disability related workplace accommodations. Requests by non-faculty employees should go to the supervisor or human resources manager; faculty employees should contact their Chair, departmental or school faculty affairs officer, or the ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer.

b. Supervisors: are responsible for receiving requests for workplace accommodations, informing employees of the process and referring requests to the appropriate human resources manager. Supervisors are responsible for initiating a discussion concerning accommodations when they have reason to believe an employee's disability precludes the employee from initiating a request. Supervisors should inform the local human resources manager of all requests and accommodations.

c. Human Resources Managers: are responsible for evaluating the request, determining what type of documentation is necessary, and determining if the requested accommodation is appropriate and effective. To identify your human resources manager, call the appropriate number: Campus (650) 721-4272; School of Medicine (650) 497-2750; SLAC (650) 926-2358.

d. Compliance Officer: The ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer provides information on the employment provisions of the ADA and employer obligations. You can also contact the Compliance Officer for information on campus accessibility, how to get technical and assistive equipment, and funding sources. You can reach the ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer at the Diversity & Access Office located in Kingscote Gardens, 419 Lagunita Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, (650) 725-0326, FAX (650) 723-1791, TTY (650) 723-1216.

e. Chairs and Faculty Affairs Officers: are responsible for receiving requests for workplace accommodations and referring requests to the ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer for handling under procedures similar to Section 3.

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3. Process—Recommended Steps

a. Step One - Request: The employee is responsible for requesting a workplace accommodation for his/her disability. The request shall be made to either the employee's supervisor or the local human resources manager. Requests should be in writing and include:

  • Employee's name, telephone number and address
  • Department
  • Supervisor
  • Physical or mental condition and its duration
  • Nature of request
  • Brief explanation of how the requested accommodation will enable the employee to perform the essential functions of his/her job.

b. Step Two - Discussion: When received, the supervisor or human resources manager will meet with the employee to acknowledge the request and explain the process. The supervisor or human resources manager will also meet with the employee as necessary to discuss the request and accommodation alternatives.

c. Step Three - Documenting the Disability: The supervisor or human resources manager evaluating the requested accommodation will determine what type of documentation is necessary to verify the disability. This may vary depending on the nature and extent of the disability and the accommodation requested. It is the employee's responsibility to provide the requested documentation on his/her disability. If the University determines it is appropriate to get a second professional opinion concerning the nature or impact of a physical or mental disability, the Department will bear the cost of the second opinion. The request for an accommodation will be evaluated once the employee submits all documentation to the human resources manager and/or the supervisor.

d. Step Four - Evaluation: Appropriate accommodations are determined following an individualized assessment of each request. The supervisor or human resources manager will consider the needs and requests for reasonable accommodation to determine whether the necessary equipment or services exist already in a different department or unit before investing in new equipment or additional services. Among the factors considered in determining reasonable accommodations for employees are:

(1) What is the nature of the employee's physical or mental condition and how does it affect his/her needs in the workplace setting?
(2) Does the employee's physical or mental condition limit one or more major life activities?
(3) Will the requested accommodation allow the employee to perform the essential job functions effectively?
(4) Will the requested accommodation alter or remove an essential function of the job?
(5) What impact will the requested accommodation or modification have on the department or unit?

The University is not required to provide an accommodation that will eliminate an essential function of the job in question or to provide an accommodation or service that is personal in nature, such as a hearing aid or wheelchair. Furthermore, the University is not required to lower performance, production or conduct standards, or alter attendance requirements expected of all employees.

e. Step Five - Notification: The supervisor or human resources manager evaluating the request for an accommodation shall provide the employee with written notification of the determination within 15 calendar days of receiving the completed request (including the requested documentation). If the determination includes an accommodation, the notice will also include the expected implementation date. If the supervisor or the human resources manager needs additional time to assess a request or to provide an accommodation, he/she shall provide the employee with written notification of the status of the request and the proposed date of determination.

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4. Funding

If the accommodation is appropriate and reasonable, then the department bears the initial responsibility for funding the accommodation. If the cost is beyond the department's means, the cost should be shared by higher levels in the department's/office's reporting line. For information on additional funding resources for disability-related accommodations, contact the Diversity & Access Office at (650) 725-0326.

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5. Resolving Disagreements

In the event an employee disagrees with the determination and/or proposed accommodation, he/she may contact the ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer at the Diversity & Access Office, Kingscote Gardens, 419 Lagunita Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, telephone 723-0755, FAX 723-1791, for assistance in resolving the disagreement.

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6. Confidentiality and Records

All University employees have a legal obligation to maintain confidentiality regarding a staff or faculty member's disability-related information. To that end, Supervisors and local human resources managers shall provide information to staff and faculty only when necessary to facilitate accommodations.

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2.2.8 Controlled Substances and Alcohol

Last updated on:
03/15/2012
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
23.6
Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President of Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all Stanford employees, certain individuals who are not Stanford employees (as defined in the Policy section) and students.

1. Background and Purpose

a. Health Risks
It is widely recognized that the misuse and abuse of controlled substances, illegal drugs (collectively called controlled substances1 and alcohol are major contributors to serious health problems and social and civic concerns. The health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of controlled substances and alcohol include various physical and mental consequences including addiction, severe disability and death. Information concerning the known effects of alcohol and specific drugs is available from the Office of Alcohol Policy and Education at (650) 723-3429.

b. Federal Legislation
In response to these concerns, the U.S. Congress passed the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and the Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991.In accordance with these Acts, Stanford University has enacted the following policy applicable to all employees and students.

1Controlled substances are those defined in 21 U.S.C.812 and include, but are not limited to, such substances as marijuana, heroin, cocaine and amphetamines.

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2. Policy

It is the policy of Stanford University to maintain a drug-free workplace and campus. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession and/or use of controlled substances or the unlawful possession, use or distribution of alcohol is prohibited on the Stanford campus, in the workplace or as part of any of the University's activities. (For clarification of what activities related to controlled substances and alcohol are unlawful, see the Appendix at the end of this Guide Memo.) The workplace and campus include all Stanford premises where the activities of the University are conducted. Moreover, employees are prohibited from being under the influence of controlled substances or alcohol while at work. Violation of this policy may result in disciplinary sanctions up to and including termination of employment or expulsion. Violations may also be referred to the appropriate authorities for prosecution.


a. Employees
As a condition of employment, all Stanford employees are expected to report to work in a condition that enables them to perform their job duties, with or without reasonable accommodation, in a safe manner that does not jeopardize their own safety or the safety of others.

Employees are prohibited from being under the influence of controlled substances or alcohol while at work. "Under the influence" is a condition where an employee's sensory, cognitive, motor functions or job related capabilities are affected, impaired or diminished and may be exhibited through various behaviors including slurred speech, difficulty walking, red eyes, erratic or threatening behavior, the odor of alcohol, etc. (Note: Lawfully prescribed prescription drugs used in accordance with their instructions are not subject to this policy.)

Employees who unlawfully manufacture, distribute, dispense, possess or use controlled substances or unlawfully use, possess, or distribute alcohol in the workplace, on the campus, or as part of any University activity will be subject to discipline up to and including termination of employment. Employees required to obtain Commercial Drivers Licenses to drive vehicles heavier than 26,000 pounds, vehicles placarded for the transportation of hazardous materials, and/or vehicles designed to carry 16 or more persons are subject to a protocol of testing for the use of drugs and alcohol in accordance with DOT guidelines. Employees at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory must comply with SLAC's Fitness for Duty policy.

b. Students
Students are bound by this policy and the Stanford Student Alcohol Policy.

c. Others on Campus
Individuals who are not Stanford employees, but who perform work at Stanford for its benefit (e.g., independent contractors, temporary employees provided by agencies, visitors engaged in joint projects at Stanford or volunteers) are required to comply with this policy. Such individuals who violate this policy may be barred from further work for and at Stanford.

d. Rehabilitation
Successful completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program (including participation in aftercare) may be considered evidence of eligibility for continued or future employment or for reinstatement of student status.

e. Reporting of Convictions
An employee who is convicted (including a plea of nolo contendere) of a criminal drug statute violation occurring in the workplace or on Stanford property must, notify Stanford University of the conviction within five days after the conviction. Notification must be in writing to the local human resources office, the Associate Vice President of Employee & Labor Relations (for staff) or the Dean (for faculty).

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3. Guide to Supervisors

Responsibility for effective implementation and enforcement of Stanford's Controlled Substances and Alcohol Policy begins with supervisors. Supervisors must be alert to indications or evidence of the use or presence of controlled substances or alcohol in the workplace.

a. Communication
Supervisors must make sure that employees are aware of Stanford's Controlled Substances and Alcohol Policy and understands that violation of this policy is a serious matter and cause for disciplinary action including possible termination.

b. Consultation with Human Resources
If and when an employee is suspected of violating this policy, the supervisor should consult with the local human resources office to plan and carry out an appropriate investigation and resolution of the situation.

c. Impaired Performance on the Job: Under the Influence of Controlled Substances or Alcohol in the Workplace
Performance problems on the job can have many causes. In discussions with an employee concerning any performance problem, the supervisor should offer to help the employee determine the source of the problems and offer guidance on appropriate assistance, counseling or other resources.

When job performance has become impaired, the supervisor should take normal corrective action, beginning with discussion with the employee. When the behavior of an employee on the job raises safety concerns for the employee and/or others in the workplace, the supervisor must take immediate action and prohibit the employee from continuing on the job until it is determined that he/she is fit to return to work and perform safely. Specific actions to be taken depend on the facts of the particular situation. Supervisors should consult with their local human resources office and document any cases of suspected employee impairment while at work.

In a situation when the employee acknowledges to the supervisor that poor performance or unacceptable conduct results from a substance or alcohol abuse problem, the supervisor should urge the employee to seek help from a qualified substance abuse treatment resource. If the employee requests a leave of absence for a rehabilitation program, the supervisor should take normal steps to review the leave request. After a review of the situation, any misconduct, performance issues or policy violations which occur before, or coincident with, a voluntary admission of impairment may form the basis of disciplinary consequences up to and including termination.

d. Testing for Drugs and Alcohol
Supervisors of employees who are required to obtain a Commercial Drivers License to drive vehicles weighing more than 26,000 pounds, vehicles placarded for the transportation of hazardous materials, and/or vehicles designed to carry 16 or more persons are responsible for making sure the appropriate tests for the use of drugs and/or alcohol are administered through a suitable drug testing service provider. The department/ school is responsible for managing the testing process and determining if the use of an outside vendor is needed for this purpose.

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4. Getting Help

Employees concerned about substance use, abuse, and rehabilitation are strongly encouraged to contact their physician, their medical plan, or the Stanford Faculty & Staff Help Center, which can refer employees to appropriate resources (community or private agencies) that provide complete, confidential substance abuse counseling.

Stanford's medical insurance plans provide coverage for substance abuse programs. Go to the Stanford Benefits website for additional information.

Students (including employees who are also Stanford students) are urged to contact the Office of Alcohol Policy and Education at (650) 723-3429.

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The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, and/or use of a controlled substance or alcohol is regulated by a number of federal, state and local laws. These laws impose legal sanctions for both misdemeanor and felony convictions. Criminal penalties for convictions can range from fines and probation to denial or revocation of federal benefits (such as student loans) to imprisonment and forfeiture of personal and real property.

This Appendix contains a list of some of the laws pertaining to the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance or alcohol. Because the laws change from time to time, the information provided in the Appendix is illustrative, not exhaustive. More detailed and current information is available from the Stanford Department of Public Safety.

APPENDIX

Generally, as of February 2006 it is a criminal offense:

  • to illegally manufacture, sell, distribute or possess controlled substances (those listed in Schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C.812) (21 U.S.C. 828, 841, 844, 859, 860)
  • to unlawfully possess or possess for sale controlled substances specified in California Health and Safety Code 11054, 11055, 11056, 11057, 11058
  • to possess, cultivate, sell or possess for sale marijuana (CA Health and Safety Codes 11357, 11358, 11359)
  • to use or be under the influence of a controlled substance (CA Health and Safety Code 11550)
  • to transport, sell, or distribute marijuana to a minor or to use a minor to transport, sell, or distribute marijuana (CA Health and Safety Code 11361)
  • to possess, furnish or manufacture drug paraphernalia (CA Health and Safety Code 11362 et seq.)
  • to provide any alcoholic beverage to a person under 21 or to any obviously intoxicated person (CA Business and Professions Code 25658; 25602)
  • to be under the influence of alcohol in a public place and unable to exercise care for one's own safety or that of others [CA Penal Code 647(f)]
  • for persons under 21 to have any container of alcohol in any public place or any place open to the public (Business and Professions Code 25662)
  • to operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicants or with a blood alcohol level of .08% or higher (CA Vehicle Code 23152)
  • for any person under the age of 21 to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol level of .05% or higher (CA Vehicle Code 23140)
  • to have an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle and for persons under 21 to drive a vehicle carrying alcohol or to possess alcohol while in a motor vehicle (CA Vehicle Code 23223; 23224)
  • to have in one's possession or to use false evidence of age and identity to purchase alcohol (CA Business and Professions Code 25661)
  • for any person under age 21 to purchase alcohol (CA Business and Professions Code 25658.5)

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2.2.9 Employee Training

Last updated on:
08/30/2012
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
23.7

Stanford University is obligated to provide necessary training to employees of the University, and retains the right to identify certain training as required. Where identified as required, training will be considered a job responsibility, as it is integral to the quality of work performed by the employee and contributes to the overall effectiveness of organizational operations.

Authority: 

This policy is established by the Vice President of Human Resources, who determines training requirements upon consultation with the other University officials and groups as appropriate. Additionally, Deans, Vice Presidents or members of the Provost's staff may determine that specialized training is required within their Schools or organizations. Such training will be identified and delivered locally, with support from central training providers as appropriate and available.

Applicability: 

The policy is applicable to all Stanford University employees, including faculty, staff and students.

1. Purpose/Rationale

The increasing complexity of the work environment requires continuing development of competencies and upgrading of knowledge and skills relating directly to the performance of work. In addition, changes in external regulation and Stanford policies, procedures and practices have created risks/liabilities which require the delivery of consistent information to Stanford University employees (faculty, staff and students) with specific responsibilities. The documented delivery of training is in some cases mandated by external agencies and subject to audit review (for example, in areas such as financial management, health and safety practices, and sponsored project administration).

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2. Actions and Instructions

a. Department Managers are responsible for:

  • Identifying those employees who perform work requiring specific training.
  • Taking necessary actions to enable the delivery of necessary training, including identifying appropriate courses and providing release time as needed for participation.
  • Monitoring job performance, and incorporating ongoing training and development as an element of continuing staff performance appraisal.
  • Providing support after training to maximize application of skills on the job.

b. Departments providing required University-wide training are responsible for:

  • Responding to client needs by developing curriculum to address job requirements; considering the content and delivery of training to maximize value, while minimizing the time needed to achieve proficiency, and considering alternatives to classroom instruction whenever feasible.
  • Continually evaluating the effectiveness of training programs.
  • Recommending to the Vice President of Human Resources specific training for required delivery to University populations. Such recommendations must include definition of:
    - rationale for requiring training
    - populations for which training is a requirement
    - delivery plans (including necessary resources)
    - methods for documenting delivery

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3. Documentation and Enforcement

Satisfactory completion of required training must be documented within the organization requiring the training. Such documentation is a prerequisite for authorization to perform certain tasks; e.g., for authority to expend University funds or for access to particular information or materials.

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4. Cognizant Offices

Questions about this policy may be directed to Learning & Organizational Effectiveness at (650) 723-4635 and learningdev@stanford.edu. This office chairs the University Training Advisory Committee.

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5. Definitions

a. Required Training—Material for which competency must be demonstrated as a condition of employment in certain jobs, or for the assignment of certain tasks.

b. University-wide—Having general applicability to members of the University community, not specific to any School, department or office.

c. Local Training—Having specific applicability to the needs of an individual School, department or office.

d. Release Time—Time away from the job made available for participation in training or other job-related activities. Release time is compensable working time.

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2.2.10 Gifts and Awards for University Employees

Last updated on:
03/15/2009
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
23.8

This Guide Memo provides specific guidelines for conferring non-taxable gifts or awards upon eligible University employees.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was jointly approved by the Vice President of Human Resources and the Controller.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all faculty, academic staff, and regular staff as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.

1. Policy Statement

At the discretion of each department or school, gifts or awards may be made to University employees for non-performance related recognition, such as to acknowledge years of service or celebrate retirement. The expense of such gifts or awards must come from appropriate University funds. In addition, the succeeding award guidelines must be followed or all or part of the value of gifts or awards will be reportable to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as taxable income to the employee.

This policy does not cover ordinary business expenses in the promotion of employee morale. Examples of such business expenses are: occasional business lunches; office gatherings; or flowers for bereavement, hospitalization, or family crises. Nor does this policy cover performance-based awards or bonuses, which are generally taxable to the recipient and are processed through Payroll. Furthermore, this policy does not preclude individual faculty or staff members from giving personal gifts to their colleagues provided University funds are not used for this purpose.

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2. Purpose

Stanford University understands the importance of maintaining morale by recognizing employee length-of service, retirement or other special occasions. This guide memo provides specific guidelines regarding the value and type of gifts or awards that are nontaxable income.

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3. Staff Length of Service/Retirement Rewards

A regular staff employee and an academic staff employee must be in active service on his/her anniversary date to receive the length-of-service award. Length of service is determined by computing the period of service as defined in Guide Memo 2.1.6: Vacations, Section 1.a. The following length-of-service/retirement award guidelines have been developed according to IRS regulations. Awards which adhere to the following parameters and are given to eligible employees are not subject to taxes:

a. Timing
The length-of-service/retirement award may not be made within the employee's first five years of service or more frequently than every five years. Length-of-service and/or retirement awards given within the first five years of service or more frequently than every five years will be taxable in full and must be reported as such to the Controller's Office.

b. Dollar Limit
The value or cost of the award should not exceed $400. Also, it is recommended that the value or cost of the award be commensurate with the number of years of service being recognized (e.g., the 15-year service award is greater than the 10-year service award). Length-of-service or retirement awards with a value or cost over $400 will be taxable to the extent the value or cost exceeds the dollar limit (e.g., if a $450 award is given, then $50 will be taxable).

If the staff employee elects to retire the same year he/she becomes eligible for a length-of-service award, then the maximum value or cost of the award(s) should not exceed $400 for the award(s) to be nontaxable. In rare circumstances the nontaxable amount of the award may be higher than $400. Any exceptions must be approved in advance by the Associate Controller that oversees Disbursements. (See the Financial Management Services Organization Chart

c. Form of Awards
In order to avoid tax reporting as income, the award must be in the form of tangible personal property. The IRS does not consider gift certificates to be tangible personal property, and accordingly, they are subject to tax. If the award is in the form of cash, check, or gift certificate, the value of such items is treated as additional wages regardless of cost or value (see Section 5.a. below for an exception for nominal gifts).

d. Meaningful Presentation
The award must be presented as part of a special event or celebration that marks the occasion, such as a departmental meeting, party, or luncheon. Every attempt should be made to give a length-of-service/retirement award during the year the anniversary occurs. To avoid tax liabilities to the attendees, departments or schools should ensure that special presentation events are conducted only on an occasional basis and that the costs of the events are reasonable.

Deans/Directors/Vice Provosts/Vice Presidents are responsible for ensuring that award programs at different levels within their organization comply with all the above IRS requirements for nontaxable gifts.

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4. Faculty Retirement Awards

Faculty members with more than 5 years of service are eligible to receive an award from the University upon retirement or departure from the University to recognize their service and contribution. (Faculty members do not participate in the staff 5-year incremental length-of-service award.) For retirement awards to be nontaxable to the recipient, they must meet the 5-year service requirement noted in this section as well as the requirements listed under Sections 3.b. to 3.d. of this policy. Any award that does not meet the IRS requirements will be taxable income and must be reported as such to the Controller's Office. For example, if an award is granted prior to 5 years of service or is a gift certificate, the entire award amount is taxable income. Also, if the award value/cost exceeds $400, then any amount over $400 will be taxable (e.g., if a $600 retirement award is given, then the $200 over the dollar limit will be taxable income).

It is the Department Chair's responsibility to ensure that awards comply with the IRS requirements. In rare circumstances the non-taxable amount of the award may be higher than $400. Any exceptions must be approved in advance by the Associate Controller that oversees Disbursements. (See the Financial Management Services Organization Chart.

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5. Nominal Gifts

Each department or school determines who is eligible and what occasions warrant the gift. To ensure these gifts are nontaxable to the recipient(s), departments need to follow the IRS regulations outlined below:

a. Dollar Limit
The aggregate gift value should not exceed $50 per individual. If the value of the gift(s) exceeds $50, then the entire gift will be taxable. Qualifying gift certificates in amounts not exceeding $50 will be considered nominal and not taxable. To qualify, a gift certificate must be one that requires the recipient to exchange the certificate for tangible personal property from the issuing vendor, and cannot be convertible to cash or used to reduce the balance of the recipient's account with the company issuing the gift certificate.

b. Frequency
The gift should be given only on an occasional basis. Gifts given to an employee(s) on a regular or routine basis do not qualify for nontaxable treatment and must be reported as taxable income.

c. Noncash Gift
The gift must be tangible personal property. That is, it may not be a check, or a gift certificate over $50. (see qualifying gift certificate description in 5.a. above).

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6. Guide to Supervisors

a. Nontaxable Gifts/Awards
The cost of the nontaxable gift and/or award may be paid personally and reimbursed by the University using the Oracle Financials reimbursement application or purchased using a university PCard. The name of the employee and the occasion for the gift (e.g., 10-year service) must be included on the request or included in the PCard verification information to ensure timely processing. For more information see Guide Memo 5.4.3: Reimbursement of Expenses.

b. Taxable Gifts/Awards
The cost of gifts or awards that fail to meet one or more of the IRS requirements outlined in this policy may be paid personally and reimbursed by the University using the Oracle Financials reimbursement application or purchased using a University PCard. The name of the employee, his/her employee ID number and occasion for the gift must be included on the request, or included in the PCard verification information, to ensure timely processing of the request. All reimbursements processed for these types of gifts will be sent to the Payroll Department and the amounts will be included in the employee's W2 or 1099 forms. For more information, see Guide Memo 5.4.3: Reimbursement of Expenses. Any gift purchased using the PCard must be clearly identified in the business purpose as being a gift. The PCard verifier must be able to provide tax information to Disbursements upon request in order to properly complete any required tax reporting to the recipient. Failure to do so will result in loss of card privileges.

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7. Resources

For more information about employee gifts, please contact the appropriate local human resources manager.

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2.3.1 Survivor Benefit Plans

Last updated on:
02/10/2014
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.1
Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

All faculty and staff are subject to this policy if appointed 50% time or more for a period of at least six consecutive months. For specific questions, contact Stanford Benefits. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining.

1. Group Life and Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance

For information about coverage, eligibility, enrollment, benefits and costs, go to Stanford Benefits

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2. Business Travel Accident Insurance

a. Brochure
The plan brochure for this insurance is available on the Cardinal at Work website.

b. Guide to Supervisors
In the event of the accidental death, dismemberment or permanent total disability of any employee while engaged in the performance of authorized travel for the University, the employee's department should immediately contact Stanford Benefits. An affidavit will be required from the University certifying that the travel was undertaken for an official University purpose. In processing expense reimbursement vouchers for official travel, supervisors should remind employees that individually purchased "trip life insurance" is not a reimbursable expense because the University provides this automatic blanket travel accident insurance.

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3. Social Security Survivor Payments

Under some circumstances the Social Security program, which covers all regular Stanford employees, provides payments upon the death of an employee. Information about these benefits is available at http://www.ssa.gov/ or at a local office of the Social Security Administration.

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4. Stanford Retirement Plan Survivor Benefits

Under some circumstances, the University's retirement plans include benefits for survivors or beneficiaries when the employee dies before retirement. Refer to the applicable Summary Plan Description on the Cardinal at Work website or contact the University HR Service Team.

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5. Workers' Compensation Survivor Payments

Death benefits will be paid to surviving dependents if an injury results in death. Death benefits paid to survivors are set by State law according to the number of dependents. Contact the Risk Management Office for assistance.

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2.3.2 Health Plans

Last updated on:
03/15/2010
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.2

The University provides Health Plans for eligible employees. This Guide Memo provides details on eligibility and links to further information.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to regular employees (as defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions. For policies that apply to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the agreements between Stanford University and SEIU Higher Education Workers Local 2007 and Stanford University and the Stanford Deputy Sheriffs' Association. Agreements can be found at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining. While these policy statements are applicable to all University staff, the SLAC Human Resources Department should be contacted for specific information relating to SLAC employees.

1. Eligibility

All faculty and staff are eligible to enroll if hired/appointed to a 50% time or more position for a period of at least six consecutive months (four months or more for bargaining unit employees). Eligible dependents may also be enrolled. Additional information is available on the Cardinal at Work website. Exceptions (not eligible): Temporary employees, employees working less than 50% time, Stanford students, visiting scholars and postdoctoral fellows.

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2. Coverage Available to Faculty and Staff

a. Medical Plan
The University makes available to each eligible employee and official University retiree several medical plan choices. These medical plan choices are described in the Summary Plan Descriptions (SPD) and the Evidence of Coverage (EOC) on the Cardinal at Work website or by contacting the University HR Service Team. The SPD is the official University communication on the plan and contains information on eligibility, enrollment and participants' rights under the plan and federal law, and certain other subjects. Each carrier's EOC describes the carrier's benefits and how the plan operates.

b. Dental Plan
The University offers a choice of dental plans, covering certain expenses for necessary dental coverage for enrolled employees. The Summary Plan Description is available on the Cardinal at Work website or by contacting the University HR Service Team. It includes information on eligibility, benefits and participants' rights under each plan and federal law, and certain other subjects.

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3. Enrollment

a. New Hire
Faculty and staff may enroll themselves and dependents in a medical and/or dental plan by completing the online enrollment during the first 31 calendar days after their hire/appointment date.

b. Change in family status
Mid-year enrollments and changes are allowed (as defined by federal law) within 31 calendar days of a qualified family status change. For more information, visit the Cardinal at Work website.

c. Open Enrollment
Stanford has an annual open enrollment period, usually in November, to enable employees to review and/or change their benefit options. Elections are effective at the beginning of the new plan year, January 1.

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4. Stanford Contributions to Health Plans

For the current University contributions to medical and dental plans visit the Cardinal at Work website or contact the University HR Service Team.

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5. Privacy

Stanford's ERISA (Employee Retirement Income Security Act) benefits plans operate in compliance with the Privacy Rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), which governs the treatment of individually identifiable health information.

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2.3.3 Tuition Privileges

Last updated on:
12/15/2009
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.4

This Guide Memo describes a tuition grant program for children of faculty and staff and auditing privileges for Stanford University courses.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice Provost for Student Affairs and the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all Stanford employees except those covered by collective bargaining agreements. For benefits applicable to employees covered by collective bargaining agreements, refer to the applicable agreement at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining.

1. Tuition Grant Program for Children of Faculty or Staff

Stanford University has a program under which eligible faculty and staff may receive financial assistance toward the cost of post-high school education for their children. "Tuition Grant Program (TGP) Guidelines" provides information about eligibility, coverage, benefits, and application procedures. Guidelines and FAQ are available on the Cardinal at Work website, or contact the University HR Service Team. Schools and divisions at their discretion may provide tuition assistance to other staff (not to exceed the benefit provided by the tuition grant program). That tuition assistance is taxable and will be reported as income to the employee.

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2. Auditing Stanford Courses

a. Courses Available
It is necessary to limit the audit privilege to lecture courses. Auditing is not feasible and will not be authorized for courses which involve individual instruction such as creative writing, acting, studio art, music practice, language practice (grammar or conversation), seminars, and courses with laboratories.

b. Eligibility to Audit With Waiver of Fees
The usual fee for auditing will be waived for faculty members and for spouses and same-sex domestic partners of faculty and regular employees, and also for regular employees when the course will improve the employee's efficiency on the job. The children of faculty and staff are not eligible to audit classes with a waiver of fees.

c. Procedures
Registration forms for auditing are available at the Student Services Center in Tresidder Memorial Union. All auditors must obtain the course instructor's permission to audit. Staff employees must also obtain written permission from the department head stating that the course will improve the employee's effectiveness and that time off is approved if needed. All persons requesting to audit will be required to present their Stanford I.D. card at the time they register.

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3. Staff Development and Training

Information about tuition assistance and other training and development programs for regular employees is provided in Guide Memo 2.1.12: Staff Development Program.

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2.3.4 University Housing Programs

Last updated on:
03/15/2010
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.5

This Guide Memo provides information on University housing programs available to eligible faculty (and certain executive staff positions as designated by the Provost's Office).

Authority: 

Approved by the Provost.

Applicability: 

Information about eligibility for University Housing Programs can be found on the Faculty Staff Housing website or by calling (650) 725-6893.

1. Purpose

The purpose of the University's housing programs is to further Stanford's objectives of teaching and research. Access to affordable housing is essential if the University is to recruit and retain outstanding faculty. University housing programs available to faculty (and certain senior staff positions as designated by the Provost's Office) are designed to mitigate the effect of the high cost of local housing in a cost effective manner with available financial, administrative and land resources.

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2. Responsibility

Faculty Staff Housing (FSH) administers the University's housing programs, and monitors eligibility requirements and guidelines for the programs.

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3. Policies and Procedures

To qualify for University housing programs, one must meet the criteria for an Eligible Person. Information about current housing programs and eligibility criteria is available from the FSH website. You may contact FSH by calling (650) 725-6893 or emailing fshousing@stanford.edu. The Faculty Staff Housing office is located at Owen House, 552 Lane A, Stanford, CA 94305-8630. Programs and eligibility requirements are subject to modification or discontinuation without notice by the University.

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2.3.5 Disability and Family Leaves

Last updated on:
01/01/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.7

This Guide Memo describes medical and other disability-type leaves, and the coordination of these types of leave with University benefit plans.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to regular Stanford University employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements, regular Academic Staff - Research, and regular Academic Staff - Libraries. (The term "regular employee" is defined in Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.) For policies that apply to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, refer to the agreements at Labor Relations & Collective Bargaining.  

Notes:

  • Procedures for SLAC employees may vary.
  • Faculty may consult the Faculty Handbook, chapter 3.
  • See information on each disability plan for specific details about plan eligibility.

1. Overview

Eligible University employees can participate in a variety of family and medical leaves (also known as Family and Medical Leave Act, and referred to in this document as FMLA) and disability benefit plans. Policies are described in this document. Before you go out, consult with your local Human Resources Office and contact Stanford Benefits. Important information regarding the scope and use of the disability benefit plans is included in the relevant plan brochures available on the Stanford Benefits website.

a. Specific Process for a filing a disability claim:
(1) The employee reports the absence (or planned absence) to his/her immediate supervisor.
(2) The employee calls Liberty Mutual's toll-free number, (800) 896-9375, or uses http://www.mylibertyconnection.com/ to initiate a claim. Liberty Mutual will inform the employee if there are any forms to submit.
(3) If the employee does not call Liberty Mutual, it is the department's responsibility to notify Liberty Mutual.
(4) Continue steps per general process for all disabilities in section 1.b.

b. General Process:

(1) Timeliness
Employees must give notice of anticipated family or medical leaves and file claims for disability plan benefits as soon as feasible. Notice should be given to the immediate supervisor, the HR Disability Leave Administrator and Liberty Mutual. For work-related leaves, refer to section 4, Workers' Compensation. For example, an employee who will be hospitalized on a pre-determined date should contact Liberty Mutual before entering the hospital. In addition, the employee must submit the signed Authorization to Release Information card to his/her physician's office as soon as possible. No disability benefits can be paid until Liberty Mutual has received the completed physician's form with appropriate verification of the disability. If not hospitalized, the employee still needs to report the absence to Liberty Mutual and his/her supervisor.

(2) Workers' Compensation
When the employee's disability is, or may be, work-related, the department should report the circumstances to the Risk Management Office within 24 hours of the employee's injury. See section 4, Workers' Compensation. SLAC employees should refer to SLAC Human Resources for the relevant reporting requirements.

(3) The HR Disability Leave Administrator
The local HR Disability Leave Administrator notifies and coordinates with Disability and Leave Services (DLS) in Human Resources. The local HR Disability Leave Administrator works with the employee, his/her supervisor and DLS to ensure that information is communicated in a timely manner.

(4) DLS
DLS updates the employee's Axess/PeopleSoft record and works with Stanford's benefits vendors and the local Disability Leave HR Contact.

(5) Supervisor's Ongoing Communication
The supervisor (or local Human Resources Office on the supervisor's behalf) should routinely check the determination made on the employee's claim for short-term (VDI/SDI) disability benefit or Workers' Compensation benefit payments. The supervisor should arrange with the employee to be kept informed about the estimated return to work date for an employee who is absent for an extended period. If the employee is unable to advise the supervisor personally about his/her inability to return to work, the supervisor should make other arrangements to be kept advised of the status of the employee's return to work.

(6) Medical Certification
The employee must call Liberty Mutual to initiate a leave request and open a disability or FTD claim. Liberty Mutual will work with the employee to obtain the necessary certification from a health care provider. The employee must provide certification within 15 days to Liberty Mutual. Certification is also required to request a leave extension.

(7) Length of Leave

  • Maximum Duration
    Except as otherwise required by law, the maximum duration that a regular employee is eligible to be on an approved medical leave of absence due to a non-work-related injury or illness is no more than 12 consecutive months, inclusive of any periods of full- or part-time leave, Family Medical leave, pregnancy disability leave, or leave for personal reasons. If an employee is unable to return to work at the end of an approved medical leave, the employee will be terminated. Twelve months of leave is not guaranteed. The maximum duration of leave will be determined based on the particular circumstances of the situation, including the operational needs of the department, the number of times extensions of leave have been previously granted, and any disability accommodation leave that may have been granted.
  • Exceptions
    If a proposed leave will result in a total period of absence exceeding 12 months, prior approval is required from the local Human Resources Office and in concurrence with the Vice President of Human Resources (or his/her designee). Requests for exceptions must be submitted in writing to the local Human Resources Office. Such exceptions are likely to be approved only in limited circumstances.

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2. Family and Medical Leaves

a. Introduction
Family Medical Leave is leave authorized by the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and/or the California Family Rights Act (CFRA). Certain leaves for members of the armed forces and their families are outlined in Guide Memo 2.1.18. In most cases, FMLA and CFRA run concurrently with each other and with Short-Term Disability Leave, including leave due to work-related illness or injury, and with Family Temporary Disability Leave (FTD). Eligible employees are assured up to 12 weeks unpaid leave during a rolling 12-month period that begins on the verified FMLA start date. "Assured" means the department cannot refuse the leave when any one of the following situations is appropriately verified:

  • The birth of a child or the placement of a child with the employee for adoption or foster care.
    Limitations: Leave for birth or placement of a child for adoption or foster care should generally be taken in blocks of time (two weeks minimum) and must be concluded within the first 12 months after the birth or placement. A request for baby bonding leave in less than two weeks' duration may be granted on any two occasions.
  • A serious health condition that makes the employee unable to perform his or her job.
  • The serious health condition of a spouse, same-sex domestic partner, parent or child that requires the employee's absence from work to care for the ill family member.

Definition of "Serious Health Condition"
Serious health condition (as defined by the Dept. of Labor) means an illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves either:

  • Inpatient care (i.e., an overnight stay) in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical-care facility, including any period of incapacity (i.e., inability to work, attend school, or perform other regular daily activities) or subsequent treatment in connection with such inpatient care; or
  • Continuing treatment by a health care provider, which includes: 

1. A period of incapacity lasting more than three consecutive, full calendar days, and any subsequent treatment or period of incapacity relating to the same condition that also includes:

a. treatment two or more times by or under the supervision of a health care provider (i.e., in-person visits, the first within 7 days and both within 30 days of the first day of incapacity); or
b. one treatment by a health care provider (i.e., an in-person visit within 7 days of the first day of incapacity) with a continuing regimen of treatment (e.g., prescription medication, physical therapy); or

2. Any period of incapacity related to pregnancy or for prenatal care. A visit to the health care provider is not necessary for each absence; or
3. Any period of incapacity or treatment for a chronic serious health condition that continues over an extended period, requires periodic visits (at least twice a year) to a health care provider, and may involve occasional episodes of incapacity. A visit to a health care provider is not necessary for each absence; or
4. A period of incapacity that is permanent or long-term due to a condition for which treatment may not be effective. Only supervision by a health care provider is required, rather than active treatment; or
5. Any absences to receive multiple treatments for restorative surgery or for a condition that would likely result in a period of incapacity of more than three days if not treated.

b. Eligibility
Employees working in the U.S. are eligible if employed by Stanford at least one year and have worked at least 1,250 hours (paid time off, paid leave and unpaid leave not included) during the 12 months before the start of the requested leave.

c. Notification
Employees are expected to provide 30 days advance notice to their manager when the need for leave is foreseeable (i.e., anticipated date of birth, adoption or planned medical treatment). When advance notice is not possible, employees should give as much advance notice as feasible. If advance notice is not provided when the employee had sufficient prior knowledge of the need for leave, the department may deny leave until 30 days have elapsed. Such denial should be made only when operationally necessary, and always in consultation with the local Human Resources Office. Employees are required to give a minimum of two days notice if the return to work will be later or earlier than the expected return date.

d. Medical Certification
The employee must call Liberty Mutual to request FML/CFRA leave. Liberty Mutual will work with the employee to obtain certification from a health care provider that the employee, his/her child, parent, spouse, or same-sex domestic partner in fact has a serious health condition, the condition's expected duration, and the need for the employee to attend to the family member. The employee must provide certification within 15 days to Liberty Mutual. Certification is also required to request a leave extension.

e. Intermittent Leave
Under some circumstances, employees may take FMLA leave intermittently (taking leave in separate blocks of time for a single qualifying reason) or on a reduced schedule (reducing the employee's usual weekly or daily work schedule). When leave is needed for planned medical treatment, the employee must make a reasonable effort to schedule treatment to avoid unduly disrupting department operations.

For birth and care of a child or "baby bonding" under California (CFRA) law, an employee may use intermittent leave in segments of two weeks. A request for baby bonding leave of less than two weeks duration may be granted on any two occasions.

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3. Pregnancy and Disability Leave

California law currently provides eligible employees up to four months off for pregnancy disability leave (PDL). The first three months of PDL run concurrently with the employee's federal FMLA entitlement. Following PDL, the employee may be eligible to use up to 12 weeks of California Family Rights Act (CFRA) leave. Verified pregnancy disability leave does not count against an employee's California Family Rights Act (CFRA) leave entitlement unless the employee has exhausted the maximum pregnancy disability leave permitted by law.

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a. Introduction
Under California law, eligible employees are entitled to a paid leave of absence up to 30 days for the purpose organ donation and up to 5 days for bone marrow donation. The leave may be taken in increments during any one-year period. The one-year period starts on the first day of leave. Use of accrued time for a portion of the leave will be required (see section 4.d). Periods of authorized Paid Organ Donor leave do not run concurrently with either FMLA or CFRA leave and are not counted against an employee's annual FMLA/CFRA entitlement.

b. Eligibility
The employee must complete at least 90 days of service with the University before requesting Paid Organ Donor leave.

c. Medical Certification
The employee must call Liberty Mutual to request a Paid Organ Donor leave and provide written medical verification that he /she is an organ or bone marrow donor and the medical necessity for the donation. Liberty Mutual must receive the certification within 15 days of the Paid Organ Donor leave request.

d. Pay During Leave
During the period of Paid Organ Donor leave, employees will be required to use 5 days of accrued time for bone marrow donation and 10 days for organ donation. Once the amount of required accrued time is used, the employee will be on paid leave of absence for the remainder of the Paid Organ Donor leave.

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5. Workers' Compensation

a. Introduction
The purpose of this coverage is to provide partial income continuation during absences resulting from work-related injuries or illnesses, and payment of necessary medical, surgical, and hospital services for such injuries and illnesses. The University pays the full cost of Workers' Compensation coverage. Workers' Compensation payments are a non-taxable benefit paid directly to the employee by Zurich North America, a third party administrator.

b. Eligibility
All employees of the University, including student employees, staff, and faculty, are covered by Workers' Compensation. Work-related disability provisions are applicable to temporary, student and casual employees; however, the charging (or not charging) of vacation and/or sick time is not applicable.

c. Reporting and Recording Work Injuries and Related Absences From Work
Departments have additional requirements for reporting all work-related injuries and illnesses. See Guide Memo 7.6.1: Accident and Incident Reporting.

d. Payments
The Workers' Compensation administrator (Zurich) normally pays benefits from the fourth day of the disability period or the first day of hospitalization, whichever occurs first. If the employee is out of work more than 14 days (need not be consecutive) with a doctor's authorization, the three-day waiting period is waived and retroactive payments will be made so that payments start with the first day of disability. For Workers' Compensation, Stanford charges up to the initial five full work days of absence (days need not be consecutive) of an accepted claim to work-related disability paid leave. The University will augment the Workers' Compensation benefit with salary during this period. An employee's sick time or vacation is not charged for these days of absence. By state law, an employee may not receive both Workers' Compensation benefits and full pay. Therefore, employees are required to reimburse the University for any Workers' Compensation benefits paid for the first five days including any associated holidays, because the University has already paid the employee for the time. For part-time employees, the full day is prorated based on the employee's normal work schedule.

e. Delayed Claims
If acceptance of a claim is delayed, the initial five full days of absence (need not be consecutive) are charged to accumulated sick time and the claim is handled as a short-term non-work-related disability. If accumulated sick time is exhausted, the time is charged to accrued PTO, floating holiday and vacation, in that order. If the employee does not have enough accrued time, the remaining hours are unpaid. If the claim is then accepted under Workers' Compensation, any sick, PTO, floating holiday, and /or vacation taken during the first five days will be restored.

f. Supplementing Workers' Compensation Payments
Employees may receive both paid leave and disability plan benefits concurrently, not to exceed the employee's base pay. After the initial five work days of disability, accumulated sick, PTO, floating holiday and vacation time will be used, in that order, to supplement Workers' Compensation benefits. Thus, the employee continues to receive income equivalent to full pay.

g. Role of Disability and Leave Services
Disability and Leave Services (DLS) updates Axess/PeopleSoft HRMS records each pay period for all employees on absences due to work-related disability. DLS makes certain that combined income from disability payments and Stanford does not exceed pre-disability pay and keeps accurate records of leave time used.

h. More Information
Details regarding claims procedures, accident reports, and related matters may be obtained from the Risk Management Office, (650) 723-7400, Workers' Compensation Benefits. Also, Guide Memo 7.6.1: Accident and Incident Reporting, has additional information about Workers' Compensation. SLAC employees should refer to SLAC Human Resources

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6. Income During Family and Medical Leaves

a. Use of Accrued Time
Accrued time consists of sick time, PTO for the calendar year, floating holiday for the calendar year and vacation, to be used in that order. During medical leaves (including Workers' Compensation, FMLA, CFRA and PDL), the University will use an employee's accrued time to maintain the employee's base pay. For FTD leaves, please see section 6.d. When the employee is also receiving disability benefits, DLS ensures that combined income from both the disability vendor and the University does not exceed pre-disability pay. Accrued time is used until the employee goes off disability, including Worker's Compensation, or until all balances are exhausted. The use of some forms of accrued time is at the employee's option during certain FMLA leaves. If an employee chooses not to use accrued time during a medical leave, the employee must contact the department's HR Disability Leave Administrator or HR department to complete the Disability/Leave Request Form. An employee's request to opt out of the payment practice can only be for future pay cycles and not retroactively. Disability and Leave Services (DLS) administers the employee's records in the Human Resources Management System. Procedures at SLAC will differ.

Thus, if the employee has accrued time and is also receiving disability benefits, the employee will receive disability checks from Liberty Mutual and/or Zurich and reduced paychecks from the University until his/her accrued time has been exhausted. Once the accrued time is exhausted, the employee will only receive disability checks from the disability vendor for the duration of the approved leave.

b. Overpayment
If an employee has been overpaid, the employee must reimburse the University for the overpayment either by direct payment or through payroll deduction.

c. Voluntary Disability Insurance / Short-Term Disability
(1) Introduction
The University's VDI plan is state-approved to take the place of SDI by providing benefits that are better than those of the state's plan. The VDI plan provides partial income continuation for periods of disability of up to 52 weeks or a maximum dollar amount. This plan is described in the Statement of Coverage available on the Cardinal at Work website or by contacting the University HR Service Team. For information on SDI, go to the Employment Development Department's website at www.edd.ca.gov.
(2) Eligibility
Faculty and staff based in California are covered for short-term disabilities by either the University's voluntary disability insurance plan (VDI) or State Disability Insurance (SDI) if the employee opted out of VDI. Non-California employees are covered under a separate 13-week short-term disability plan (STD).
(3) Benefit Waiting Period
Refer to the Voluntary Disability Insurance Statement of Coverage on the Cardinal at Work website, or contact the University HR Service Team.
(4) Taxability
Short-term disability (VDI/SDI) payments are non-taxable benefits. These non-taxable benefits are paid directly to the employee by Liberty Mutual.

d. Family Temporary Disability (FTD)
(1) Introduction
This California state program provides partial income replacement during absences from work to care for seriously ill family members (parent, child, spouse, registered domestic partner, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, or parent-in-law) or to bond with a new child.
(2) Eligibility Faculty and staff based in California contribute to a Family Temporary Disability Insurance Benefit (FTD) according to state law as part of the VDI deduction.
(3) Vacation usage
Employees must take two weeks of earned but unused vacation leave before receiving FTD insurance benefits. One of these vacation weeks can be used during the seven-day waiting period. If an employee does not have two weeks accrued vacation time, vacation time will be used to the nearest full day increment up to the two-week requirement. If less than one week of vacation is available, PTO or floating holiday will be used for the remaining portion of the waiting period. If no PTO or floating holiday is available, the remaining portion of the waiting period will be without pay. For a new mother who has received pregnancy disability benefits due to pregnancy/maternity disability the two-week vacation period will apply, however, there is no additional waiting period for bonding.
(4) Supplementing FTD Payments
During Family Temporary Disability Leaves the University will use an employee's accrued time to maintain the employee's base pay during times when the employee is receiving FTD benefit payments as described below: 

  • In cases of FTD Bonding Leaves, eligible accrued time consists of PTO for the calendar year, floating holiday and vacation, in that order.
  • In cases of FTD Family Care Leaves, eligible accrued time consists of Family Sick Leave, as restricted by the FSL policy, PTO for the calendar year, floating holiday and vacation, in that order.

This accrued time is used until the employee goes off approved Family Temporary Disability Wage Replacement (FTD), or until all balances are exhausted. Disability and Leave Services (DLS) administers the employee's records in the human resources management system. DLS ensures that combined income from both the disability vendor and the University does not exceed pre-disability pay. Procedures at SLAC will differ.
Thus, if the employee has accrued time, the employee will receive FTD benefit checks from Liberty Mutual, and a reduced paycheck from the University while on approved FTD until the employee's applicable accrued time has been exhausted. Once the applicable accrued time is exhausted, the employee will only receive the FTD benefit checks from Liberty Mutual for the duration of the approved leave.
(5) Overpayment
If an employee has been overpaid, the employee must reimburse the University for the overpayment either by direct payment or through payroll deduction.
(6) Taxability
FTD is a non-taxable benefit for state and FICA, but is a taxable benefit for Federal tax purposes.
(7) More Information
The benefit is described at http://benefits.stanford.edu/ Forms are available on this website in the Resource Library.

e. Long-Term Disability (LTD)
(1) Introduction
This plan provides partial income continuation during longer periods of disability. LTD benefits could start after a disability period of 90 consecutive days. After a disability period of 15 months, the plan's benefits are more restricted because a more stringent definition of "disability" is used.
(2) Eligibility
Employees whose approved disability continues past 90 consecutive days may be eligible for Long-Term Disability. The disability vendor provides the employee with the appropriate information when the employee's disability period approaches 90 days.
(3) Taxability
Long-term disability benefits are taxable for federal and state, non-taxable for FICA.
(4) More Information
The Summary Plan Description for the Long-Term Disability Plan provides information about coverage, definition of disability, and benefits. It is available on the Cardinal at Work website.

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7. Benefits During Disability Periods

a. Health and Life Benefits
(1) Paid Leave
There will be no change in benefit deductions. Employees on paid FMLA, FTD, VDI or Workers' Compensation will have their applicable benefit contributions deducted from their reduced paychecks. See (3) for LTD.
(2) Unpaid Leave
Employees on unpaid FTD, VDI, Workers' Compensation, and all LTD participants (paid or unpaid) will have the same University benefit contributions as when actively employed. The employee will be billed for the employee portion of the costs on an after-tax basis on the 7th and 22nd
(3) LTD and Part-Time Work
If an employee continues to receive LTD benefits, but is able to work part-time, there will be no change in benefit contributions. Employees will have applicable benefit contributions deducted from their reduced paychecks. of each month.

b. Retirement Savings Plan (SCRP)
(1) Paid Leave
When an employee continues to receive pay for accrued sick, PTO, floating holiday and vacation, retirement savings plan benefit accruals and/or contributions continue, subject to plan provisions.
(2) LTD Plus Paid Leave
Employees who supplement LTD benefits with accrued time (e.g., sick, vacation, PTO, floating holiday) will have that paid time counted as earnings for University retirement savings plans, subject to plan provisions.

c. Retiree Medical Eligibility
During the first 90 days on Short-Term Disability or Workers' Compensation, time is counted toward official retiree medical eligibility. After 90 days on LTD, the time does not count toward official retiree medical eligibility.

d. Benefits in Cases of Termination
(1) Medical and Dental Coverage
A regular employee whose University employment is terminated while the employee is receiving benefit payments from a Short-Term Disability plan or Workers' Compensation plan may continue medical and dental coverages at the employee's expense through COBRA for 18 months, or until LTD is approved. If LTD is approved, the employee may contact Stanford Benefits, for information on their eligibility for medical and life insurance plans.
(2) Life Insurance
Life insurance portability or conversion to an individual plan is available. The employee should contact Stanford Benefits at the time of termination for the appropriate forms.

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8. For More Information

Consult with your local Human Resources Office or review the Cardinal at Work website. General questions about State Disability Insurance (SDI) and Workers' Compensation should be referred to the appropriate government office.

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2.3.6 University Resources

Last updated on:
06/15/2007
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
27.8

This Guide Memo lists some of the services and resources available for faculty, staff and students, and gives references for obtaining additional information.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

1. Policy Statement

Stanford University provides resources and services to support employees and students in balancing their work/family/personal lives.

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2. Applicability

The services and resources are available to Stanford faculty, staff and students; some services are also available to the families of faculty, students and staff.

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3. Family Support

The WorkLife Center supports Stanford community members in all the stages of family life, providing information on education, campus and community programs and services for a variety of issues. See WorkLife Center for more information.

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4. Child Care

a. Policy
All matters regarding the provision of child care services on the Stanford University campus must have the concurrence of the Director of the WorkLife Center. On the Stanford campus child care is permitted only in designated Stanford University academic or administrative buildings which are licensed by the State of California, Department of Social Services, Community Care Licensing.

b. Services, Resources and Referrals
Information on campus programs, community child care centers and home-based child care is available from the WorkLife Center, or (650) 723-2660.

c. Child Care Grant Program
Information is available from the WorkLife Center, or (650) 723-2660.

d. Adoption Expense Reimbursement
Information is available from the WorkLife Center, or (650) 723-2660.

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5. Counseling and Dispute Resolution

a. Human Resources Managers (HRMs)
Human resources managers in each academic school or functional area are responsible for the implementation of Stanford's personnel policies and can also help and advise on personnel matters. To find the human resources manager in your School or area, visit the HR at Stanford website or call (650) 725-8356. If you are in the School of Medicine, call (650) 497-2750; if you work at SLAC, call (650) 926-2358.

b. Employee & Labor Relations
Employee and Labor Relations provides resources for solving workplace problems, and offers policy interpretation and advice. Your area may also have an Employee Relations Specialist you can contact. Email stanfordelr@stanford.edu or call (650) 721-4272. If you are in the School of Medicine, please call (650) 497-2750. If you work at SLAC, contact SLAC Employee/Labor Relations at (650) 926-2358.

c. Faculty Staff Help Center
Free, confidential counseling, workshops and groups are offered for Stanford faculty, staff and their families. See the Help Center website or call (650) 723-4577 for more information.

d. Ombuds
Contact the Ombuds' Office and Mediation Center for impartial dispute resolution. See the Office of Ombuds website or call (650) 723-3682. If you are in the School of Medicine, please call (650) 498-5802.

e. Dispute Resolution
Formal Grievance, Appeal, and Disciplinary Processes are on the Cardinal at Work website, or can be obtained from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office.

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7. University Privacy Officer

The University Privacy Officer is responsible for Stanford's compliance with the Privacy Rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), which governs the treatment of individually identifiable health information.

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8. Additional Resources

a. Diversity & Access Office
For information about Cultural Centers, Disability Access, Staff Groups, and the University's Affirmative Action plans, see the Diversity & Access Office call (650) 725-0326.

b. Public Safety
Stanford's Department of Public Safety is a multi-service agency providing law enforcement, security, safety, crime prevention and emergency services on the Stanford campus 24 hours a day. See the Stanford's Department of Public Safety or call (650) 723-9633. At the School of Medicine, contact the Stanford Medical Center Security Services at (650) 723-7222.

c. Recreation
Consult the Stanford University Home Page for further information.

d. Other Resources
Consult http://www.stanford.edu/about/administration/ for a complete listing of University centers, services and programs.

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2.4.1 Visas for and Employment of Foreign Nationals

Last updated on:
06/15/2009
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
28.1

This Guide Memo contains policies on obtaining entry visas for foreign nationals visiting Stanford and links to web pages detailing procedural information.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to Stanford faculty, academic and regular staff, and non-matriculated students, including the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, except where SLAC maintains its own services. Consult SLAC Human Resources for information about SLAC.

1. Responsibilities

a. Departments responsible for filing a visa petition on behalf of a prospective foreign national seeking employment with the University. The host department will gather the necessary information, complete the required forms and secure the necessary departmental/school approvals in order to submit the completed petition to the Bechtel International Center. See Working with the Bechtel International Center for detailed procedures for each type of application and petition.

NOTE: Appointments or employment must be approved and confirmed before visa petitions or certificates will be prepared. See Guide Memo 2.1.2: Recruiting & Hiring of Regular Staff Employment of Regular Staff, for hiring information. Immigration status is not to be used as a means to discriminate against foreign nationals.

Information can be found at the following websites:

b. Foreign Scholar Services
Coordinates procedures and provides specific instructions for departments seeking to host or employ foreign faculty, staff or researchers (internationalscholars@stanford.edu)

c. Foreign Student Advisor
Assists students with immigration, social, cultural and adjustment issues. The office is located at Bechtel International Center (internationalstudents@stanford.edu)

d. Local Human Resources Office
Responsible for providing guidance, reviewing and verifying materials prepared by departments for non-academic staff for H-1B visas and submitting completed petitions to Foreign Scholar Services at Bechtel Center. Guidance will also be provided on the processing of a visa petition for academic staff, post docs or faculty.

e. Legal Representation
In the event that, in the opinion of the Foreign Scholar Services Office, an issue requires legal interpretation or advice, the Office of the General Counsel will review the matter and determine whether or how it should be pursued. Departments or individuals may not engage private attorneys to represent the University to government agencies. This policy, however, does not prevent an individual foreign national from retaining legal counsel (and paying for any legal fees incurred as a result) for the purpose of obtaining his or her own legal advice or pursuing a self-sponsored immigrant petition, provided the University is not named as a petitioning employer.

f. Office for International Visitors
Arranges meetings and coordinates programs for short-term visits (usually one day) by international scholars, scientists, University and public delegations, and other official visitors to Stanford University. See https://international.stanford.edu/

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2. Special Situations in the Immigration Area

a. Physicians
A physician who is to have patient contact requires a California Medical License or exemption or review letter. Contact the Director of House Staff, Stanford University Hospital, (650) 723-5948, for more information.

b. Volunteers
A foreign national who is not authorized to work in the U.S. cannot volunteer at Stanford in a position for which wages would normally be paid.

c. Dependents
Dependents are the responsibility of the foreign national.

d. Clinical Fellows
Clinical fellows must hold a California license/exemption or review letter.

f. Postdoctoral scholars

g. Green Card/Permanent Residence: The University may sponsor faculty and certain academic and other staff for permanent residence only with the approval of the cognizant dean or vice president. The USCIS processing fees and any legal fees associated with the permanent residence process are the sole responsibility of the foreign national petitioner or applicant unless otherwise agreed in writing by the sponsoring department and the individual with the approval of the cognizant dean or vice president, or his or her designee; provided, however, that, pursuant to Department of Labor regulations, the legal fees and costs associated with any labor certification application submitted in connection with the permanent residency process must be paid by the sponsoring department.

  • Faculty: Tenure-line and tenured faculty are eligible for sponsorship.
  • Academic Staff-Research: Research Associates must hold a continuing appointment of at least 75% of full-time effort in order to qualify internally for sponsorship for permanent residence. The individual must meet applicable USCIS criteria to establish a reasonable likelihood of success on the merits. Research Associates with fixed term appointments, or appointments that are continuing but less than 75% FTE will not be sponsored for permanent residence by the University.
  • Regular Staff/Academic Staff-Teaching/Academic Staff-Librarians: The University will not sponsor non-exempt staff or staff with fixed term appointments for permanent residency. Exempt, regular staff, Academic Staff-Teaching and Academic Staff -Librarians are also not eligible for sponsorship of permanent residence except in instances where it is determined by the cognizant dean or vice president, or his or her designee, in consultation with the Office of the General Counsel, that the University has an important business interest in pursuing the petition and the petition has a reasonable chance of succeeding on the merits. Such instances are expected to be rare.

h. Validity of Temporary Petitions: Employment-based nonimmigrant visa petitions such as H-1or O-1 should not exceed the term of the individual's appointment at Stanford. The legal fees and USCIS processing fees associated with these petitions are the sole responsibility of the individual foreign national unless otherwise agreed in writing by the sponsoring department and the foreign national, with the exception that the $500 USCIS fraud fee associated with H-1B petitions, which must be paid by the sponsoring department.

i. Two-year Residence Requirement: Bechtel International Center does not support, administers or review waivers of section 212(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (two-year residence requirement).

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2.4.2 Directories and Distribution Lists

Last updated on:
08/11/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
28.3

The University maintains lists of names, addresses, telephone numbers and electronic mail accounts of individuals and organizations of importance to the University. This Guide Memo sets forth policies concerning use of such University data and describes the major lists used to conduct the University's business.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all Stanford University employees and students.

1. Use of University Distribution Lists and Directories

a. Publicly Available Information

(1) Privacy
Students have rights with respect to their educational records under the Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA); see the Student Bulletin, for more information. Additionally, students, affiliates, faculty and staff may have rights to privacy under California Law with regard to certain information used in distribution lists and directories.

StanfordYou provides members of the community the ability to update key directory and contact information, including work and emergency information. To ensure contact information is available and accessible within the Stanford community, staff must maintain their work information in StanfordYou.

(2) Printed Stanford Directory
Contains information about Stanford employees, and students registered for autumn term. It is available free of charge to all continuing Stanford employees and registered students, and for purchase by the general public. By making this information publicly available, the University relinquishes control over the use to which it may be put. Therefore, particular care is taken to carry out individuals' wishes regarding the confidentiality of their home address and telephone number information. See 1.a (1) above.

(3) StanfordWho
Online directory contains information for and about current Stanford students, faculty and staff, including people affiliated with the University, Stanford Healthcare and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). This directory allows the public and Stanford community to search for the contact information of members in the community. Results are based on the settings maintained within StanfordYou.

b. Alumni Directory
The Stanford Alumni Association and other school alumni associations publish an online and print directory that is available to alumni, current students and some University departments for the user's personal use only. The directory may not be used for commercial purposes.

c. Lists for University Purposes
Distribution lists not publicly available may be used only for University purposes. Such lists include both mailing lists and electronic mail distribution lists including those created by members of the Stanford community from University sources. Use of the distribution lists (including production of listings of file contents, production of mailing labels and online use of electronic mail distribution lists) is authorized only when all of the criteria below are met:

  • The organization is responsible to the President of the University;
  • The use is for official University business; and
  • When such use is consistent with the University responsibilities of the individual requesting or using the list.

University distribution lists may not, for example:

  • Be used for personal, partisan political, or commercial purposes
  • Be provided to persons or entities outside the University
  • Be used for promotional purposes or solicitations by other than Stanford University

d. Department Responsibilities
Departments are responsible for ensuring that any lists they maintain are used in conformity with University policies. In addition to this Guide memo, the following contain applicable policies:

e. Exceptions
Any request for University data for use other than in accordance with this policy must have the approval of the President of the University or his/her designee.

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2. Person Registry

a. Contents
The Person Registry contains basic identifying information for all faculty, staff, students and affiliates.

b. Original Sources of Information
The Person Registry brings together student information from Student Administration, faculty and staff information from the Human Resources Management System, (HRMS) and sponsored affiliates' information from the SUNet ID system.

c. How Changes are Made
Faculty, staff, students and recent graduates may change their own information using the Axess portal or by using StanfordYou for service related information (e.g., email settings). Faculty and staff may change some personal information in StanfordYou; work-related changes are made in the university's HRMS by human resources administrators, with the exception of a name change, which is personal in nature but must be updated in the HRMS.

d. Outputs
(1) StanfordWho: See 1.a (3) above.
(2) Listings in the Printed Stanford Directory: See 1.a(2) above.
(3) Axess: An Intranet (referred to as the Axess portal) that faculty, staff and students use to complete many tasks.
(4) Corrections to Source Systems: Changes made through StanfordWho and Axess go to the Person Registry and then to the university's Student Administration system and HRMS.
(5) Other authorized uses: Data is available to other official University business systems, e.g., the ID Card system and the Library system.

e. More Information
See the University IT website for more information about the Registry.

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3. Human Resources Management System

a. Contents
The Human Resources Management System (HRMS) contains detailed demographic and work data on all University employees and retirees.

b. Sources of Information
Information on current employees and retirees comes from the university's HRMS and is submitted by the employee or retiree's department.

c. How Changes are Made
(1) Employees' Address and Phone Information
StanfordYou allows employees to update information published in Stanford directories. See StanfordYou for more information.
(2) Work-Related Changes
Changes other than the employee's address and telephone information are generated by the department's human resources administrator online in the university's HRMS.
(3) Retirees
Changes to retiree information are entered on receipt of written instructions from the retiree or by contacting the University HR Service Team. Only emeriti are included in the StanfordWho directory.

d. Outputs
(1) Person Registry
The HRMS feeds data to the Person Registry.
(2) Mailing Labels
The HRMS can generate mailing labels for specific populations. For advice on options available, departments should consult with Mail and Delivery Services.

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4. Student Administration

a. Contents
The university's Student Administration system includes student and applicant demographic information, including physical and email addresses.

b. Sources of Information
(1) Central Offices
Including: Bursar's Office, Office of the Registrar, Financial Aid, and Undergraduate Admissions
(2) Academic Departments
Department administrators with appropriate access enter advisors, graduate degree support information, graduate financial support information, and admissions data.

c. How Data Changes are Made
Central offices and academic departments can, in most cases, update data they have originally entered. Students can update personal information through the Axess portal and StanfordWho.

d. Outputs
(1) Person Registry
The university's Student Administration sends data to the Person Registry.
(2) Student Records
Reporting systems contain detailed student information including personal addresses. Access to this data requires approval by the appropriate School Dean for academic departments or the Registrar's Office for central office staff, and access to private information is set up only on a "need-to-know" basis. Address rosters, mailing labels, and personal reports can be generated for business purposes.
(3) Applicant Information
Undergraduate and graduate applicant demographic information is contained in university systems and/or an authorized vendor's database. Access to this data requires approval by the appropriate School Dean for academic departments or the Registrar's Office for central office staff, and is set up only on a "need-to-know" basis. Mailing labels and personal reports can be generated from the system.

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5. Alumni Information

a. Contents

(1) PostGrads
The PostGrads alumni information database includes basic demographic data for Stanford alumni, parents of students, and University friends, including corporations and foundations. This file is used to create mailing lists for the Stanford Magazine and various mailings and solicitations sent by the Office of Development, the Stanford Alumni Association, and the University. The data in this file may be selected according to particular purposes, such as those alumni who received law degrees in 1980. The Office of Development maintains and controls PostGrads.

(2) Department and School Databases
Some departments and schools keep records of their own alumni and friends. The following restrictions apply to such databases:

  • Schools and departments may receive data changes as a result of their mailings. The data changes should be sent to alumni.information@stanford.edu for updating in PostGrads.
  • Any use of PostGrads information for gift solicitations outside of the Office of Development must be approved in advance by the Office of the Vice President for Development.
  • Any use of records must be consistent with the purpose communicated to the persons providing such information.

b. Sources of Information
(1) Alumni
Data on current and graduated students is downloaded to PostGrads from PeopleSoft Student Administration. Although recent graduates can update information in Axess, information is not currently shared between Axess and PostGrads.
(2) Parents
Data on parents of Stanford students is forwarded to Development Services and PostGrads by the Stanford Parents Program in the Office of Development, which receives the information from the New Undergraduate Student Information Project, administered by the Housing Center.

(3) Stanford Friends
Data on Stanford friends is forwarded to Development Services by various other sections of the Development Office.

c. How Data Changes are Made
Development Services enters changes into PostGrads. Sources of information for changes are returned mail, postal change of address cards, correspondence with individuals on the list, changes made by the individual via their online profile, and notification from a University department with which the individual is associated. Information needed includes:

  • The individual's University ID number
  • The individual's name
  • Change information
  • Name, Stanford department, and phone number of the information source, when the information is not directly from the individual

d. Outputs from File
(1) Lists for Directories
Directories of specific populations published by schools use PostGrads as source data.
(2) Labels and Address Lists

Departments and schools needing output from PostGrads should contact their School's Development Office for assistance, after obtaining approval from the Office of the Vice President for Development. Mailing information will be prepared only for University departments. If an outside vendor provides mailing services, the department is responsible for assuring that the vendor will protect the confidentiality of the data and will gain no rights over the data.

e. Control of File
Only Development Services may make changes to PostGrads biographic and gift information. The Director of Development Services acts as coordinator in resolving questions that may arise in application of University policies on use of PostGrads.

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2.4.3 Stanford Identification Cards

Last updated on:
04/07/2017
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
28.4

This Guide Memo lists identification cards used at Stanford University and indicates their uses.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

1. Purpose of Identification Cards

a. Association with the University
Stanford University makes available a machine-readable photo identification card ("Identification Card" or "ID Card") for Stanford students, faculty, staff and other classes of individuals with a close association to the University, as specified in this policy or by the Provost or the Vice President of Human Resources. The primary purpose of the ID Card is to identify and document these relationships.

b. Privileges
Access to certain of Stanford's facilities, resources, benefits and services (together referred to as "Privileges") are available only to Stanford's faculty, staff and students with valid ID Cards. Other individuals with ID Cards may also access certain of these Privileges if permitted under this policy, or with the approval of either the Provost or the Vice President of Human Resources.

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2. Types of Identification Cards

The following types of ID Cards are issued by the Stanford University IT Card Services Office (Stanford Card Office). A more detailed description of eligibility criteria for and the privileges granted by ID Cards may be found at Stanford Card Office. This list may be updated from time to time with the approval of the Provost with respect to faculty, students and academic visitors to campus, and by the Vice President of Human Resources with respect to staff and other campus visitors.

a. Student Card: issued to registered students (undergraduates, graduate students, terminal graduates, and Visiting Researchers and Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) students in Continuing Studies).

b. Postdoctoral Card: issued to postdoctoral scholars.

c. Faculty/Staff Card: issued to Stanford professoriate, academic staff, holders of academic appointments in specified policy centers and institutes, non-affiliated Clinician/Educators, Hoover Institution Senior Fellows, "regular" staff, as defined in Admin Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions, and retired and emeritus faculty and staff.

d. Temp/Casual Card: issued to staff and holders of "other teaching titles" who qualify as "casual" or "temporary" as defined in Admin Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.

e. SLAC Faculty/Staff Card: issued to faculty and regular staff with current appointments at SLAC.

f. SLAC Temp/Casual Card: issued to SLAC staff who qualify as "casual" or "temporary" as defined in Admin Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions.

g. Fellow Card: issued to fellows, interns and other individuals who are invited to participate in a recognized full-time, campus-based Stanford non-degree program of scholarship or learning. Knight, Stegner, CASBS and Stanford Humanities Center Fellows are entitled to Fellow Cards. A Fellow Card will be issued to an individual who provides evidence of admission to a recognized Stanford program.

h. Visitor Card: issued to individuals who qualify as Visiting Scholars under Chapter 10.5 or Visiting Postdoctoral Scholars under Chapter 10.9 of the Research Policy Handbook and who are resident at Stanford for a minimum of three months and who contribute to Stanford's academic and research mission either by lecturing or actively collaborating with Stanford faculty or students on current Stanford research. A Visitor Card will be issued upon presentation of an invitation that is (1) signed by the appropriate dean or department, program, institute or center director; (2) includes dates of residency at Stanford; and (3) identifies the faculty member issuing the invitation, and the academic organization in which the Visitor will be hosted.

i. Courtesy Card: issued to:
(1) Spouses and domestic partners of students and postdoctoral scholars.
(2) Spouses and same-sex domestic partners of qualified holders of a valid Faculty/Staff or Fellow Card.
(3) Adjunct Clinical Faculty.
(4) Holders of "other teaching titles" who are not on Stanford's payroll.
(5) Staff of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching located on Stanford campus.
(6) Chaplain Affiliates.
(7) Staff of Associated Stanford Student Union (ASSU) who provide evidence that they are currently employed full-time by ASSU and do not qualify for a Stanford ID Card through other affiliation.
(8) Staff of organizations located on Stanford's campus and which, as determined by the Provost, either provide academic or research support to Stanford's faculty, or engage in other activities to support Stanford's academic and research mission. Examples include the Stanford-based staffs of the Department of Plant Biology at the Carnegie Institution for Science and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

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3. Management of Identification Cards

a. Issuance
ID Cards may be issued only by the Stanford Card Office.
(1) The ID Card photo must show the full face of the applicant, without hat or dark glasses. Head coverings may be permitted due to religious beliefs, provided the head covering does not obscure the face.
(2) For students, postdoctoral scholars, faculty and staff, the name on the Identification Card must match the official name contained in the official student or employment records maintained by the University unless an exception has been granted by either the Office of the Registrar or Human Resources.
(3) The ID Card will be issued only when the recipient shows a valid government-issued picture ID (i.e., driver's license or passport) containing a recognizable photo and the same name as the:

  • official or preferred name in Stanford's student or employment record (for students, postdoctoral students, faculty and staff),
  • name on the appointment letter (for faculty, academic staff, Chaplain Affiliates, and members of the Board of Trustees),
  • name on the evidence of admission of a Fellow, or
  • name on the invitation to a Visitor, or
  • name on the evidence of employment for ASSU employees.

(4) Courtesy cards will be issued to spouses and eligible domestic partners only when the related Student, Postdoctoral, Faculty/Staff, SLAC Faculty/Staff, or Fellow Card shows acceptable proof of marriage or qualifying domestic partnership.
(5) Initial Student, Postdoctoral, Faculty/Staff, Temp/Casual, SLAC Faculty/Staff, SLAC Temp/Casual, and Fellow Cards will be issued without fee. Courtesy Cards, Visitor Cards and all replacement cards will be issued after payment of the fee established by the Stanford Card Office. Fees are subject to change at any time.
(6) If an ID Card is lost or stolen, the cardholder must immediately report this loss/theft to the Stanford Card Office. The lost or stolen card will then be invalidated.

b. Distribution of Identification Cards
The Stanford Card Office may authorize distribution of ID Cards by other Stanford offices or departments so long as the authorization is in writing and signed by the Director of Card Services. This authorization may not be delegated, and may be revoked at any time by the Stanford Card Office. An authorized party at the Stanford office or department accepting responsibility for ID Card distribution during that academic term or distribution period, must indicate in writing (before taking possession of the cards) its agreement to adhere to requirements of 3.a(3). To ensure compliance with 3.a(3) the department will provide training to everyone distributing ID Cards.

c. Expiration Date
ID cards expire as follows:
(1) Student Card: Student Cards are valid only while the cardholder is enrolled as a student at Stanford. These ID Cards will expire on the sooner of (a) the last day of the quarter in which a student graduates or in which their registration at Stanford ends and (b) a change in status such that the student is no longer enrolled at Stanford. If a student is not registered during summer quarter, the ID Card will remain active during that quarter provided the student is registered for the following fall quarter. No expiration date will be placed on the Student Card.
(2) Postdoctoral Card: Postdoctoral Cards are valid only while the cardholder is a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford. These ID Cards will expire on the sooner of (a) the last day of the quarter in which the scholar's registration at Stanford ends and (b) a change in status such that the scholar is no longer enrolled at Stanford. No expiration date will be placed on the Postdoctoral Card.
(3) Faculty/Staff and SLAC Faculty/Staff Cards: Faculty/Staff and SLAC Faculty/Staff Cards are valid only during either the cardholder's faculty appointment, employment, or retired or emeritus status. These ID Cards will expire on the sooner of (a) the last day of a fixed term, (b) the last day of association with the University for a continuing appointment (other than for retirement), or (c) a change in status such that the cardholder is no longer entitled to Privileges. No expiration date will be placed on the Faculty/Staff and SLAC Faculty/Staff Cards.
(4) Temp/Casual and SLAC Casual/Temp: Temp/Casual and SLAC Temp/Casual cards are valid only while the cardholder remains employed by Stanford. These ID Cards will expire on the sooner of (a) the last day of a fixed term, (b) the last day of association with the University for a continuing appointment, or (c) a change in status such that the cardholder is no longer entitled to Privileges. No expiration date will be placed on the ID Card for casual employees. ID Cards for temporary employees will specify the expiration of their fixed service term.
(5) Fellow and Visitor Cards: Fellow and Visitor Cards are valid only for the period specified in the Fellow's evidence of admission or the Visitor's invitation (in either case, unless terminated sooner). Fellow and Visitor Cards respectively will specify the expiration date contained in the Fellow's evidence of admission or the Visitor's invitation.
(6) Courtesy Card: Courtesy Cards expire on the sooner of (a) the date identified in an appointment letter, (b) the last day of association with the University for a continuing appointment, or (c) a change in status such that the cardholder is no longer entitled to Privileges. If the Courtesy Card is issued to a spouse or domestic partner, the card expires on the same day that their spouse or domestic partner's ID Card expires. No expiration date will be placed on the Courtesy Cards, with the exception of Courtesy Cards issued to ASSU employees, which will contain an expiration date of June 30 following the date of issuance. Notwithstanding the date on the Card, Cards issued to ASSU employees will expire upon termination of employment. They are renewable upon presentation of evidence of continued employment.
(7) When a holder's designated association with the University ends or changes prior to ID Card expiration, the ID Card will become invalid, even if the expiration date has not passed.

d. Surrender of Cards
The Stanford Card is the property of Stanford University and must be surrendered at the earlier of:
(1) expiration, if not renewed
(2) termination of association with the University or
(3) request by a supervisor or other appropriate University official.
The appropriate manager, program director, dean or HR manager will request surrender of all Faculty/Staff, SLAC Faculty/Staff, Temp/Casual, SLAC Temp/Casual, Fellow, Visitor and Courtesy Cards, including Courtesy Cards for spouses and domestic partners, upon expiration (if not renewed) or termination of affiliation with Stanford. Surrendered cards will be destroyed.

e. Stanford Card Office
The Stanford Card Office oversees the production of new and replacement cards. Additional information on eligibility for ID Cards, and the process for obtaining an ID Card, may be found at Stanford IT Services.  

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4. Use of Facilities and Services

The privileges enabled through use of each type of ID Card vary widely. In this section, certain privileges are detailed for reference purposes only, and no reliance should be placed on these descriptions to detail all University facilities and services for which ID Cards grant access, or the eligibility criteria established for their use. Established eligibility criteria are subject to change without notice, and access to facilities and services may be denied at any time. In addition, management of each facility may limit or prohibit use of a facility by an individual card holder who, in the facility management's sole discretion, violates the rules governing use of the facility or other policies established by the University or facility management.

a. Department of Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation (DAPER): Holders of Student, Postdoctoral, Faculty/Staff, SLAC Faculty/Staff, Temp/Casual, SLAC Temp/Casual, Fellow, Visitor and Courtesy Cards have access to certain facilities and events specified by DAPER, subject to payment of established amounts, if any, for tickets or use fees. Access to Stanford's Golf Course is available only to Stanford professoriate, academic appointments in specified policy centers and institutes, academic staff, non-affiliated Clinician/Educators, regular staff, students, post-doctoral scholars, fellows in official Stanford programs, retirees, emeriti, Trustees, and those of their spouses and domestic partners with a valid Courtesy Card.

b. Libraries: While a Stanford Identification Card may be necessary to gain access to campus library resources, the possession of an ID Card does not assure access to any library. Stanford Libraries has written regulations governing the use of its libraries.

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5. Other Cards

The Stanford Card Office, and certain other departments at Stanford, issue cards which are not considered to be Stanford ID Cards and do not carry the same Privileges as an ID Card. A partial list of these cards includes:

a. Conference Identification Card
A paper card issued by the Conference Office for a specified period to individuals who are participating in summer conferences and institutes but who are not registered as students.

b. Continuing Studies Student Card
A paper card issued quarterly to registrants in Continuing Studies courses, except for those pursuing the Master of Liberal Arts degree, who receives a Student Card.

c. Dependent Card
A card issued annually or for a specified period, to the children of faculty and staff. Before issuing a Dependent Card, the Stanford Card Office must verify the parent's "Faculty/Staff" Stanford Card.

d. Library Cards
Issued by Stanford Libraries to provide library access and/or borrowing privileges.

e. Meal Cards
A card issued for use by certain non-student holders of meal plans at the University, such as children of Resident Fellows and summer conference attendees. These cards are valid only for meals in the Dining Halls.

f. Temp Access Card
A non-photo card that provides access to campus buildings. Policies and procedures related to the issuance and use of these cards are established by the issuing department.

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2.4.4 Property and Liability Insurance

Last updated on:
08/11/2014
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
28.5

This Guide Memo describes the University's property and liability insurance coverage.

For information on other insurance coverage, see:

  • Business travel accident insurance: Guide Memo 2.3.1: Survivor Benefit Plans.
  • University, government, and personal vehicle collision insurance: Guide Memo 8.4.2: Vehicle Use.
  • Rental vehicle collision insurance: Guide Memo 5.4.2: Travel Expenses.
Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer.

1. General Information

a. Administration of Insurance
The Risk Management Office is responsible for obtaining insurance and self-insurance coverage and processing all claims.

b. Who Pays for Insurance
Risk Management charges income-producing operations, formula schools, auxiliaries and general funds for their Aggregate Annual Insurance Premiums.

c. Special Insurance Coverage
Any department having special risks that it feels should be insured should discuss the issue with Risk Management. If insurance does appear to be the best way of managing a risk, Risk Management will negotiate a policy with the insurance carrier and rebill the cost to the requesting department.

d. What to do in the Event of an Accident
(1) Emergency Action
Take whatever steps are immediately necessary to render emergency medical care, salvage property, or reduce the further extent of the loss. If anyone is injured, see Guide Memo 7.2.1: Emergency/Accident Procedures, for emergency procedures, and Guide Memo 7.6.1: Accident and Incident Reporting, for reporting requirements. Report injuries promptly to comply with state law.
(2) Evidence for Insurance Claim
If possible, do not disturb the evidence or hazard which caused the claim until the area can be inspected, pictures taken, and conditions recorded. Obtain the names and addresses of parties involved, witnesses, etc. Under no circumstances should one admit liability; to do so could jeopardize the insurance coverage. As soon as possible record the details of the accident. The report should include: date, time, place, who or what was involved, how it happened, names, addresses, and estimated ages of persons involved; description of injury, loss or damage; and action that was or will be taken to prevent a recurrence. All claims must be reported immediately to Risk Management.

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2. Property Insurance

a. General Property Insurance 

(1) Situations Covered
Stanford's insurance and self-insurance on buildings and their contents includes coverage for fire, smoke, windstorm, explosion, riot, civil commotion, vandalism, malicious mischief, falling aircraft, and theft.

(2) Situations not Covered
The University does not provide insurance coverage for the following situations:

  • Damage caused by rough wear and tear, rust, dust, mechanical failure, maintenance problems, breakage, scratching, marring and staining
  • Items identified as lost as a result of inventory
  • Failed experiments, or lost or damaged research efforts
  • Management errors, financial decisions, or lost income or opportunities
  • Government-owned property
  • Personal property of faculty, staff, or students
  • Damage caused by earthquake, or natural disaster flood
  • Damage caused by terrorism or bioterrorism, except damage due to terrorism as defined by TRIA (Terrorism Risk Insurance Act) is covered.
  • In any country where trade relations are unlawful, as determined by the Government of the United States of America or its agencies, are not covered. In addition other countries may be excluded from time to time. Please see the Risk Management website for a current list of excluded countries.

(3) Deductible
The first $1,000,000 of each claim is self-insured by the University. The department that suffered the loss or damage of property pays for the first $1,000 of each claim. See Guide Memo 2.4.5: Protection of Property, for information on possible waivers of the $1,000 deductible through the Police Department's STOPP program.

(4) Claim Processing
Risk Management processes all claims for the replacement value or repair of University property that has been stolen, destroyed or damaged. Depending upon the type, size and location of the loss, Procurement or Land, Buildings and Real Estate (LBRE) will be directly involved in the repairs or reconstruction. The preparation of specifications and a bidding process may be necessary. Risk Management must receive copies of all contracts, work orders, and purchase requisitions.

In the event a claim exceeds $1000, insurance or self-insurance may pay for repair or replacement value (whichever is less). "Replacement value" means the cost to repair or replace (not book value). Loss settlements are based on the cost to repair or replace with like kind and quality. Any upgrading will be at the cost of the department that suffers the loss. If property is not to be replaced (due to obsolescence or no continuing need or use for the property) insurance proceeds will not be based on the actual cash or depreciated value.

b. Boilers, Pressure Vessels and Heavy Machinery
(1) Situations Covered
Insurance covers explosion, burning, bulging, and cracking of insured objects; machinery and equipment are covered for sudden and accidental breakdown.
(2) Deductible
There is a $25,000 deductible per occurrence, except $50,000 for medical diagnostic equipment, the full amount of which is coordinated with LBRE/Buildings and Grounds Maintenance (or the department if it is a service center, an income-producing operation, or an auxiliary).

c. Budgeting Total Property Insurance Expense
(1) Total Property Insurance Expense includes General Property Insurance and Boilers, Pressure Vessels and Heavy Machinery Insurance. Following the end of each fiscal year, the Risk Management department will secure an actuarial study of claims under the Property Insurance Program. The actuarial study will provide two key figures that will be used to budget future property insurance expenses:

(a) Self-insurance reserve required to fund claims (and related expenses) that have occurred prior to the end of the recently completed fiscal year but have not yet been settled/completed. (This can be an accumulation of several years of claims estimates, net of settlements). This actuarial required reserve may be higher or lower than the actual reserve balance at Fiscal Year End.
(b) Actuarial projected self-insurance funding levels, or cost of claims and expenses that will be incurred in the next fiscal year. This will be the amount added to the reserve balance each year to cover claims incurred in that year.

(2) During the budget planning cycle (and no later than February 1), Risk Management will provide the Budget Office with the Aggregate Annual Premium to be charged internally for Property Insurance during the next fiscal year. At the same time, Risk Management will also provide the income-producing operations, formula schools, and auxiliaries with their respective property premium allocation to be charged during the next fiscal year. The Aggregate Premium will be composed of the following five elements:

(a) Actuarial Projection of self-insurance funding for the cost of claims and expenses that will be incurred in the budget year.
(b) A reserve for future catastrophic events.
(c) Risk Management's estimate of premiums to be paid to outside insurers for excess coverage insurance during the next fiscal year.
(d) Risk Management's estimate of other direct expenses (e.g., actuarial studies, legal expenses, brokerage fees, operating expenses) associated with the Property Insurance Program.
(e) 30% of the surplus or deficit in the self-insurance reserve to the actuarial required reserve balance at the prior year-end. The application of a portion of the surplus or deficit (vs. 100%) is intended to provide a smoothing effect to avoid large year-to-year changes in the Aggregate Premium.

(3) The Aggregate Annual Premium is allocated to income-producing operations, formula schools, auxiliaries, and general funds based on property replacement values.

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3. Transit Insurance

a. Situations Covered
Stanford's insurance on transit covers all goods shipped inland to or by Stanford when the transit agreement assigns the risk to Stanford. For large (over 75 lbs.) or complicated shipments, including packing and crating, departments are encouraged to use American Overseas Air Freight.

b. Situations Not Covered
(1) Situations described in section 2.a (c).
(2) Waterborne shipments, unless by inland water, by roll-on/roll-off ferries operating between European ports, or by coastal shipments
(3) Shipments to any country where trade relations are unlawful as determined by the Government of the United States of America or its agencies are not covered. In addition other countries may be excluded from time to time. Please see the Risk Management website for a current list of excluded countries.

c. Deductible
The first $50,000 of each claim is self-insured by the University. The first $1,000 of each claim loss is the responsibility of the department.

d. Claim Processing
Immediate notification of loss to Risk Management is required for losses greater than $1,000. Risk Management must receive copies of contracts, purchase orders, bills of lading or any transit agreements, shipping documents and/or invoices.

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4. Liability Insurance

a. Situations Covered
Liability insurance covers all locations and activities including University and government-owned vehicles. (For information on coverage for vehicles, including personal vehicles used on University business, see Guide Memo 8.4.2: Vehicle Use. Liability insurance also covers non-owned aircraft, watercraft, professional liability, employers' liability, products liability, etc. University trustees, officers, faculty, and staff are included as additional insureds for activities arising out of and in the scope of their employment.

b. Situations Not Covered
Stanford and insurers do not cover employees or others for their following personal acts:

  • Criminal acts (including assault, battery, homicide, manslaughter, etc.)
  • Fraudulent/dishonest acts (including theft, plagiarism, false testimony, etc.)
  • Acts in which there is a conflict of interest (including personal gain)
  • Acts not connected with or arising out of or related to Stanford employment or Stanford activities (e.g., personal gain, etc.)
  • Fines, penalties or punishment which government authorities or law places on an individual (includes traffic fines, jail sentences, etc.)

c. Deductible
(1) Public Liability
The first $1,000,000 of each claim for public liability is self-insured by the University.
(2) Employee and/or Student Relations
The first $1,000,000 of each claim for liability claims involving student and/or employee relations is self-insured by the University.

d. Claim Processing
Upon becoming aware of an incident, which could lead to a liability claim or when a claim for liability is received, the department should immediately notify Risk Management.

e. Budgeting Liability Insurance Expense
(1) Liability Insurance includes General Liability, Educators Legal Liability, Automotive, Non-owned Aviation, and Crime Insurance. Following the end of each fiscal year, the Risk Management department will secure an actuarial study of claims under the Liability Insurance Program. The actuarial study will provide two key figures that will be used to budget future liability insurance expenses:

(a) Self-insurance reserve required to fund claims (and related expenses) that have occurred prior to the end of the recently completed fiscal year but have not yet been settled/completed. (This can be an accumulation of many years of claims estimates, net of settlements) This actuarial required reserve may be higher or lower than the actual reserve balance at Fiscal Year End.
(b) Actuarial projected self-insurance funding levels, or cost of claims and expenses that will be incurred in the next fiscal year. (This will be the amount added to the reserve balance each year to cover claims incurred in that year.)

(2) During the budget planning cycle (and no later than February 1), Risk Management will provide the Budget Office with the Aggregate Annual Premium to be charged internally for Liability Insurance during the next fiscal year. At the same time, Risk Management will also provide the income-producing operations, formula schools, and auxiliaries with their respective liability premium allocation to be charged during the next fiscal year. The Aggregate Premium will be composed of the following four elements:

(a) Actuarial Projection of self-insurance funding for the cost of claims and expenses that will be incurred in the budget year
(b) Risk Management's estimate of premiums to be paid to outside insurers for excess coverage insurance during the next fiscal year
(c) Risk Management's estimate of other direct expenses (e.g., actuarial studies, legal expenses, brokerage fees, operating expenses) associated with the Liability Insurance Program
(d) 30% of the surplus or deficit in the self-insurance reserve to the actuarial required reserve balance at the prior year-end. The application of a portion of the surplus or deficit (vs. 100%) is intended to provide a smoothing effect to avoid large year-to-year changes in the Aggregate Premium.

(3) Allocation of Liability Insurance Expense
A portion of the Aggregate Annual Premium will be carved out and allocated to certain income-producing operations, formula schools and auxiliaries based on use, attendance, occupancy and square footage measures. The balance of the Aggregate Annual Premium after carve outs is then allocated to all income-producing operations, formula schools, auxiliaries, and general funds based on the prior year's actual payroll and headcount data.

Vehicle insurance premiums are allocated on a per vehicle basis and are not included in the Liability Aggregate Annual Premium calculations.

(4) Allocation of Settlement Costs
Following the end of each fiscal year, Risk Management will provide an analysis of the cost of settling all liability claims paid during the year (regardless of the year the claim was incurred). To the extent settlement costs for a particular income-producing operation, Formula School, or auxiliary exceeds the liability insurance premium paid by that unit over the same time period, the unit will be responsible for paying eighty percent (80%) of the excess cost back to the self-insurance reserve account over a three year period. To the extent that these settlement costs are less than the liability insurance premium paid by that unit over the same period, 50% of the surplus will be credited to the unit over a three-year period. To the extent that these settlements result in over funding of the reserve account, the surplus will be applied to lower the Aggregate Annual Premium charged across the University as described in the budget section above.

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5. Crime Insurance

a. Situations Covered
Crime insurance covers loss of monies and securities due to robbery, burglary, theft, or employee dishonesty.

b. Situations Not Covered
Once a loss due to the dishonesty of an employee becomes known, the insurance company will not pay for any future losses caused by that employee. Departments must report claims promptly and take action to prevent or reduce further loss.

c. Deductible
The first $1,000,000 of each claim is self-insured by the University.

d. Claim Processing
(1) Police Report
The department must notify the Police Department immediately (see Guide Memo 2.4.5: Protection of Property.
(2) Internal Audit Report
The department must notify the Internal Audit department, which will conduct an audit of procedures and policies and make recommendations to strengthen internal controls to help prevent a recurrence of losses.
(3) Insurance Claim
The department must contact the Risk Management office for assistance and instructions on processing a claim.

e. Budgeting Crime Insurance
Included in General Liability Budgeting Process section above.

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6. Other Property and Liability Insurances

a. Bonds
Notary and other miscellaneous bonds are arranged through Risk Management. The premium is charged to the requesting department.

b. Property Leased or Loaned to Stanford
Arrangements must be made through Procurement for any property, which is to be received or accepted as a loan or a lease. It is important that an authorized official sign the agreement. The agreement must indicate the description and value of the property, the party responsible for insurance, the perils to be covered, the party responsible for transportation insurance (both coming and going), etc. Copies of such agreements must be sent to Risk Management.

Forms for loan of artwork are available from the Risk Management forms webpage.

c. Aircraft and Watercraft
If aircraft (other than scheduled airlines) or watercraft (25 H.P. or more and/or 26 feet in length or more) are to be used on University business, call Risk Management, as special insurance arrangements may be necessary to protect both the University, faculty, and staff.

d. Medical Malpractice Insurance
Contact Risk Management for additional information.

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2.4.5 Protection of Property

Last updated on:
12/15/2005
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
28.6

This Guide Memo outlines departmental responsibilities for safeguarding University property.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer.

1. Security of Facilities

a. Arrangements
Each department is responsible for making whatever arrangements are necessary to secure University facilities when they are not in use.

b. Instructions to Employees
All employees should be instructed to lock all windows, doors, and storage facilities when they leave an area unattended and at the close of normal work. Employees who work outside of regular hours should relock doors upon entering as well as when leaving a building.

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2. Protective Measures Against Theft and Vandalism

a. Keys
The number of people given keys to buildings, offices, labs, and storerooms should be kept to a minimum. A list of people with keys should be kept by each department. Keys must be returned upon termination of employment. Arrangements should be made to change keys and locks from time to time.

b. Safeguarding Equipment
Each department is responsible for the inventory and safeguard of all valuable equipment. If equipment is loaned, a record should be kept of each temporary assignment. Portable equipment of value should be kept in locked storage when not in use if this can be arranged. Consideration should be given to bolting or chaining computers, microscopes, and similar equipment to the working surface. Contact the Police Department at 650/723-9633, or see http://police.stanford.edu for advice concerning security of property through the STOPP program. Monetary losses to the department may be reduced by implementation of the program and the $1,000 insurance deductible may be waived.

c. Valuable Papers and Records
Special arrangements should be made for protecting valuable, irreplaceable, and confidential papers and records. Desks, file cabinets, and safes containing confidential or valuable documents must be locked whenever they are unattended, even for a short time. Consideration should be given to maintaining duplicate records, disks, tapes, or microfilms. Off-site storage should be arranged for valuable records. Such records should be kept current.

d. Safe Deposit Boxes
If items are to be kept in a safe deposit box, the box should be rented in the name of Stanford University and fees billed to the University (not to an individual). Notification of the box location and authorized signatures should be sent to the Risk Management Office and the Accounting Officer, Controller's Office.

e. Money and Personal Property
Employees should be reminded periodically not to leave cash, wallets, pocketbooks, or personal possessions of value in accessible locations. Personal automobiles should be locked.

f. Works of Art, Precious Metals, and Stones
Whenever works of art, precious metals (such as gold, silver, platinum, rhodium, and rhenium), or valuable stones (diamonds, opals, sapphires, etc.), whose total value is significant are acquired by purchase, donation, or loan to the University, the department is responsible for providing an adequate security and accountability system. The Police Department and the Risk Management Office are available for assistance in developing an auditable system for the receipt, inventory, storage, and accountability of the precious items. A written description of procedures should be filed in the department. Departments accepting loans or gifts of such property should send a copy of the inventory to the Risk Management Office for insurance coverage.

g. Vandalism
Adequate protection against theft should provide equal protection against acts of vandalism. If physical facilities are such that unauthorized access is possible, departments may ask the advice of the Stanford Police for methods of obtaining adequate protection.

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3. Reports of Theft or Vandalism

a. Immediate Reports to the Police
Thefts, evidence of attempted theft, and acts of vandalism must be reported to the Stanford Police as soon as the discovery is made.

b. Investigation of Theft or Vandalism
Only the police are authorized to conduct an investigation of a theft or act of vandalism. Everyone else is cautioned to refrain from disturbing the evidence and from taking action in the matter except under the direction of the investigating officer.

c. Insurance
The Risk Management Office processes all claims for the replacement value or repair of University property that has been stolen, destroyed or damaged. For more information, see Guide Memo 2.4.4.

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4. Theft by University Employees

a. Staff
A staff employee determined to have participated, as perpetrator or accomplice, in theft of University property or property for which the University is responsible is subject to discharge and legal action.

b. Faculty
Members of the Academic Council are governed by the Statement on Faculty Discipline, which can be found in the Faculty Handbook.

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5. Use of University Property

University property may not be used for personal purposes or for personal gain. See Guide Memo 8.2.1: University Events, and the Public Events Policy and Practice Manual for policy on use of University property for public events.

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2.4.6 Indemnification

Last updated on:
09/01/2005
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
15.7

This policy covers indemnification of employees.

Authority: 

Approved by the President.

Applicability: 

This policy applies to all employees of the University.

1. Indemnification Policy

Stanford's policy is to indemnify and defend its faculty and staff in compliance with California Labor Code Section 2802.

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2. Sources For More Information

Any questions regarding indemnification should be referred to either the Office of the General Counsel or the Office of Risk Management.

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