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10.1.1 Undergraduate Student Employment

Last updated on:
02/06/2016
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
24

This Guide Memo outlines policies and procedures for employment of Stanford undergraduate students on campus. For employment of graduate students in research and teaching assistantships, see Guide Memo 10.2.1. For employment of graduate students in hourly positions, see Guide Memo 10.2.2

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice Provost for Student Affairs.

1. Definitions and Distinctions

a. Student Hourly Employment
Stanford University uses student hourly employment to hire Stanford students for jobs that are specifically earmarked for matriculated students. All Stanford University student employment is hourly, with the exception of assistantships, which are limited to graduate students (see Guide Memo 10.2.1). Student workers are supervised in their work, are hired through the PeopleSoft HR system, and must record and approve their work hours. Compensation for all undergraduate student jobs must be established on an hourly basis, and the amount of pay is based on the actual number of hours worked in each pay period. These job assignments are incidental to the student’s course of study with reasonable limitations placed during the academic quarter on the nature of the work assignment and the number of hours of employment. Students cannot volunteer for positions that are normally paid positions.

b. Stipend
A token payment to recognize a student for a one-time event or support for a project such as an undergraduate research project. Stipends are not used as compensation for employment. All undergraduate stipend payments are processed by the Financial Aid Office.

c. Student Residence Roles
Each residence on campus has a core group of students that charges itself with managing the various programmatic components of life in the residences. A nominal stipend to defray living expenses is offered in conjunction with many of these roles (https://resed.stanford.edu/get-involved).

d. Contingent (Casual or Temporary) Employment is used to hire an individual for a part-time or temporary staff position. Contingent employment must be used for hourly employment assignments for non-matriculated students or matriculated students when on a Leave of Absence. Contingent employment is not normally used for enrolled, matriculated Stanford students but must be used for any student working more than 36 hours per week.

e. Federal Work-Study (FWS)
Stanford University participates in the FWS program as defined in Title IV of the Higher Education Act. Under this program funds are allocated to Stanford to allow students with qualifying financial need to gain valuable work experience while earning money to help pay for college. The program is administered by the Financial Aid Office in coordination with the hiring departments. Under the FWS program, federal funds are used to pay 75% of student wages, and the Provost pays the remaining 25%. A subset of the FWS program, Community Service Work-Study, allows qualifying students to work off campus at nonprofits who take responsibility for 10% of student wages (more information).

f. Off-Campus Internships and Off-Campus Employment are not covered by this policy, with the exception of federal Community Service Work-Study positions managed by the Haas Center for Public Service. In both cases, students are encouraged to be mindful that their primary obligation is to their academic program.  International students must also adhere to visa requirements.

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2. Listing Student Jobs

a. Job Listing Services
Stanford departments wishing to hire undergraduate students as part-time workers are strongly encouraged to use the Handshake system administered by BEAM, Stanford Career Education to list their job openings. Departments should log onto https://stanford.joinhandshake.com/login to post a job and reach a large cross section of students.

b. Hours Per Week
Students are encouraged to limit their hours of work so that they may devote sufficient attention to their studies. Therefore, the jobs listed for undergraduates during any enrollment period should not typically require more than 15 hours per week of work. During break periods between quarters, undergraduates may be employed full time. Thanksgiving recess is not a break between quarters.

c. International students on F-1 or J-1 visas are subject to both University policies on employment and visa requirements that limit employment; in all cases, the more restrictive limitation will apply.

d. Students on Financial Aid
Nearly half of Stanford’s undergraduate population receives need-based aid and most are expected to contribute toward their costs through employment. The standard expectation can be met by working eight to ten hours per week. Not all students receiving aid will qualify for Federal Work-Study; when possible, department funded jobs should be made available for students on aid.

e. Non-Discrimination
Non-discrimination policies applicable to regular staff, as stated in Guide Memo 2.1.2, section 2.a, and also apply to student employees.

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3. Schedule of Job Categories

The following schedule is is designed to promote consistency in student pay. Starting wages in these categories are based on the requirements of the job and the applicable experience of the student. Range within levels is available to allow employers' flexibility in setting student wage rates as job requirements and student performance vary widely. The suggested wage scale is updated annually at http://financialaid.stanford.edu/aid/employ/wage_scale.

a. Level I
The work at this level requires that employees perform tasks characterized by a prescribed standard. Duties typically are repetitive and workers follow simple instructions that require little interpretation or skill. The supervisor determines work priorities and reviews work for accuracy. Typical kinds of work at this level include:

  • Office work requiring minimum skills, such as file clerk, messenger, or receptionist
  • Light manual labor such as animal caretaker, driver, or tour guide
  • Rudimentary laboratory work such as glassware washer
  • Food service work in the residences
  • Library work such as shelving, checking in materials, completing forms, photocopying, or preparing materials for binding

b. Level II
At this level, employees have independent responsibility for the accurate completion of a variety of tasks requiring judgment and interpretation in applying procedures correctly. The supervisor generally reviews the work for correct final results. Typical kinds of work at this level include:

  • Office work requiring basic accounting, or knowledge of office machines
  • Strenuous labor such as gardener or storekeeper
  • Technical work requiring specialized skills such as photographer, or projectionist
  • Laboratory work requiring a moderate level of scientific knowledge
  • Library work such as answering information questions, basic use of claims and invoices, or nonroutine clerical duties

c. Level III
At this level, employees have substantial responsibility for determining work procedures and methods of work and for coordinating phases of work with others. Originality, analysis, and judgment are required to carry out work. The supervisor reviews work when guidance is required. Typical kinds of work include:

  • Computer programmer
  • Administrative assistant
  • Musician, or artist
  • Job recruiter
  • Library work that requires extensive use of foreign languages, having responsibility for a branch library or similar unit for long periods of time without supervision, or very specialized bibliographic searching including in-depth use of RLIN

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4. Hiring, Paying, and Supervising Students

a. Hiring
The supervisor notifies the human resources administrator to make the appropriate system entry. Students should be hired into the appropriate Job Classification Code (JCC). The student must be hired into PeopleSoft HR before beginning work. Students who are hired during summer quarter, but who are not enrolled, must be hired as Student Hourly Employees using the appropriate Summer Student JCC. This step is required even if the student is continuing a work assignment that started during the academic year.  Procedures for hiring FWS students can be found at http://financialaid.stanford.edu/faculty_staff/undergraduate.

Students who receive a university award that includes funding to hire undergraduate students to complete hourly work (e.g., coding, transcription, or other effort associated with academic projects) are subject to these policies. In such cases, the department should manage the funding and hire the student hourly employee.

b. Payment
Departments pay student workers from their own sources of funding, except for students who qualify for FWS. Hourly student workers must record actual hours worked in Axess Timecard each pay period. Each month has two pay periods: The first day of the month through the 15th and the 16th through the last day of the month. Paychecks are issued on the workday that falls on or immediately prior to the seventh calendar day after the end of each pay period.

c. Supervision
One person should be named as the student's immediate supervisor and should be directly accountable for overseeing the student's work and ensuring approval of hours worked in Axess.

d. Work Schedules
A student is expected to work the agreed hours, be punctual and satisfy all reasonable requirements of the employer with regard to performance and behavior. Most on-campus employers build in some flexibility in hours given students' exam schedules, but that is not always possible and students are expected to carry through if they have agreed to be at work.

e. Sick Time
Sick time provides a mechanism to pay student hourly employees when they are unable to perform their work responsibilities due to illness or for other related reasons. All Stanford student hourly employees receive sick time benefits. Arrangements for any variations in work hours, including time off for illness or related uses of sick time, should be made individually with the student hourly employee’s supervisor. To the extent possible, student hourly employees are encouraged to make arrangements outside of their working hours and supervisors are encouraged to offer flexibility in work hours. For information about the accrual and use of sick time for student hourly employees, see Administrative Guide Memo 10.3.1.

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10.2.1 Graduate Student Assistantships

Last updated on:
09/04/2015
Formerly Known As Policy Number: 
24.2

This Guide Memo summarizes the regulations regarding Graduate Student Assistantship appointments at Stanford University. Definition of the Graduate Student Assistantship is followed by the criteria for eligibility to hold an assistantship, a brief description of each type of assistantship, the rules governing Tuition Allowance, and other policy matters. For questions regarding this subject, please contact the Financial Aid Office.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice Provost for Graduate Education.

Applicability: 

Applies to the appointment of graduate students to Graduate Student Assistantships.

1. Definitions and Distinctions

a. Graduate Student Assistantships are a form of student employment, earning a compensation package including both salary and tuition allowance (TAL) for the performance of research or teaching services to the University as part of the student's academic and professional training and development.

Distinctions from Assistantships:

  • Fellowships
    Fellowship stipends are financial aid, not salary. No service is expected in return for a fellowship; it is awarded on a merit basis to assist a student in the pursuit of a degree.
  • Hourly Employment through Payroll
    Graduate students may be employed and paid for work unrelated to the student's academic and professional training as described in Administrative Guide 10.2.2: Graduate Student Hourly Employment. Such employment is not considered an assistantship appointment, does not generate tuition, and is not processed in GFS.

b. The Graduate Financial Support (GFS) system is the online application used to enter all graduate student research and teaching assistantship appointments and fellowships. Although they are not matriculated Stanford graduate students, Postdoctoral Scholars' appointments also are entered in GFS. GFS also handles financial support for other non-matriculated graduate students, e.g., Visiting Student Researchers. Non-matriculated students are, however, in general not eligible for assistantships.

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2. Assistantship Eligibility Criteria

a. Matriculation at Stanford with an active authorization to enroll and an active graduate degree program, or, for Research Assistantships only, enrollment in non-matriculated graduate status as a Student of New Faculty. Coterminal students in both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree program are eligible for assistantships after completion of 12 quarters or, upon request, after completion of 180 units of undergraduate work.

b. Enrollment
All students holding assistantships must be enrolled in each quarter in which the assistantship appointment is held. For autumn, winter and spring quarters, unless the student is on TGR status, the student must be enrolled for 8-9-10 units. Except for Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR) students, the GFS System will not allow payment of TAL unless the graduate student is enrolled full-time during autumn, winter and spring quarters. Exceptions to this enrollment requirement are allowed for Honor Co-op students, for students with disabilities, and for a childbirth accommodation.

c. Relevancy
The service performed (teaching or research) must be related to the student's academic program in order to qualify for the assistantship appointment.

Note: Entering and approving the assistantship appointment in Graduate Financial Support (GFS)/Worklist Manager constitutes a statement that the work involved is relevant to the student's academic program.

d. English proficiency for teaching assistantships
All international students must be approved for English proficiency before being appointed to any teaching position.

  • The department that plans to appoint an international student as a TA/CA must have the student review the TA screening webpage, that has information about making an appointment. Note: Whenever possible, the TA screening should occur at least one full quarter in advance of the assistantship appointment. This allows the student time to take any required or recommended classes to improved communication skills.
  • Upon successful completion of the TA screen and/or required classes, EFS enters the approval of English proficiency (TA OK) in the GFS system, after which the assistantship appointment can be processed.

e. I-9 eligibility to work in the U.S.A.
By federal regulation, all individuals receiving salary through Payroll must demonstrate eligibility to work in the U.S.A. by filing Federal Form I-9. Departments must forward necessary paperwork to Payroll in advance of the student's first paycheck. For more information, see Student Specific Payroll Administration

f. Social Security Number must be on file with Payroll.

g. Alternatives
In the case where no matriculated graduate student is available to fill a need for a Research or Teaching Assistantship, an undergraduate or non-matriculated person may be hired in the categories of Teaching Aide or Research Aide. These are hourly-paid positions, processed through the Human Resources Management System (HRMS), not the GFS system. Individuals appointed to these positions are never eligible for a Tuition Allowance. The appropriate department chair (or program director) and school dean's office should confirm that no matriculated graduate student is available before these alternative appointments are processed.

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3. Types of Assistantship Appointments: Teaching

Graduate student teaching responsibilities are categorized into the following four appointment levels.

Stanford University establishes annually a minimum salary rate for each of these levels. (Mentor Teaching Affiliate and Graduate Teaching Affiliate positions have the same minimum salary.)

Note: No student may be appointed to any of the following positions for a course in which the student is simultaneously enrolled.

a. Course Assistant
Assists a faculty member who has primary responsibility for a course. Duties vary but do not include classroom teaching. Duties may include:

  • Assisting in the preparation of lecture materials and running laboratory sessions.
  • Conducting review sessions and grading exams.
  • Holding office hours.
  • Monitoring or maintaining existing course web sites.

b. Teaching Assistant
Has significantly more independence than a Course Assistant. The Teaching Assistant works with a faculty member who has primary responsibility for a course, or assists a group of students in several courses. Duties vary and may include:

  • Preparing for class sections and/or laboratories where new material may be presented.
  • Presenting material in classroom or lab setting.
  • Marking and/or grading some portion or all of the exams or papers (but not independently assigning the final grade).
  • Holding regular office hours.

c. Graduate Teaching Affiliate
This teaching appointment is limited to graduate students who have had substantial teaching experience. The Graduate Teaching Affiliate will typically be identified as the Instructor in Stanford publications, and will have primary charge and responsibility for the course (with the mentorship of a faculty member). Responsibilities for the class typically include:

  • Preparation, teaching, grading, holding regular office hours, etc., in keeping with the established practices of the department.
  • In some cases Graduate Teaching Affiliates have full responsibility for a course where the content is defined by a faculty coordinator. In other cases, they will develop course materials independently with the guidance of a faculty mentor for a course that has been approved by the department/program in which it is offered.

d. Mentor Teaching Assistant
This teaching appointment is limited to graduate students who have had substantial teaching experience. In addition to the responsibilities of a Teaching Assistant, this student:

  • Serves as a head Teaching Assistant to coordinate the training and guidance of Teaching Assistants in a given course or set of courses.
  • Develops complex materials (including web-based) in support of a course or group of courses.

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4. Types of Assistantship Appointments: Research

The following research appointments are listed in ascending order of qualifications, responsibility, and compensation.

a. Research Assistant
Works on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member.

b. Predoctoral Research Affiliate
An advanced Ph.D. student in one of these appointment categories:

(1) Engineering and Natural Sciences

  • Performs research or administrative tasks beyond the scope of a typical graduate research assistant's work.
  • This category should not be used to fill a regular staff position.

(2) Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Is engaged in research under the supervision of a faculty member.
  • Makes an original contribution to a research effort that serves the common professional objectives of the student and supervisor.

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5. Percentage and Period of Assistantship Appointments

a. Full-quarter Appointments
Assistantship appointments are made for a full quarter (3 months of either teaching or research work). Standard appointment periods are: October 1–December 31, January 1–March 31, April 1–June 30, and July 1–September 30. An alternate quarter schedule is available for students whose work begins before the start of a standard quarter. Students on an alternate schedule must remain on that schedule throughout the academic year.

b. Autumn, Winter and Spring Assistantship Appointments

(1) The minimum assistantship is 10% time. Percentage of appointments must be in increments of 5% time.

(2) 50% Maximum — The typical assistantship appointment is for a maximum of 50% time, to allow students to make expeditious progress toward their degree. Assistantships totaling more than 50% can impede that progress.

(3) An appointment of 40% may be combined with a 10% appointment to total 50%. Appointments of 45% are not allowed.

(4) Approval for Exceptions — Assistantships for more than 50% time during the academic year, two concurrent assistantships totaling more than 50% time, or enrollment in more than 10 units while holding a 50% appointment, require the prior approval of the student's advisor, the Department Chair, and School Dean's office.

  • Recommendations for such assistantship appointments should indicate the academic progress of the student and the anticipated degree completion date; the student must have been admitted to candidacy.
  • Approval will be granted only where such an assistantship appointment will not interfere with progress towards the degree and normally will be granted for no more than one year.

c. Summer Assistantship Appointments

(1) Percentage of Time—In summer quarter, in addition to the standard 10-50% assistantships, appointments at 60-90% time are permitted (see section 5.d).

(2) Number of Units—In summer quarter, graduate students must be enrolled in at least one unit or TGR (Terminal Graduate Registration) to have any size assistantship appointment. Students with appointments totaling more than 50% will have their Tuition Allowance reduced proportionately (see TAL tables) in order to accommodate additional employment. (For example: A student's 70% appointment(s) earns the same TAL as a 30% appointment. Appointments of 90% provide TAL equal to the value of 1-3 units of tuition.) Students combining an assistantship with more than 8 hours of hourly employment during the summer should reduce their enrollment in proportion to their total Summer Quarter employment. Students registered TGR must enroll in the TGR course (801 or 802).

For additional information regarding TAL in Summer, see Section 7.d(4).

d. Assistantships Totaling More Than 50%

(1) Whether approved as an exception (5.b.4 above) or permitted as summer employment, the maximum combined assistantships for any student during any quarter is 90%. Appointments totaling more than 36 hours/week may not be processed in GFS, are not considered assistantships, and do not include a tuition allowance; they should instead be processed through HRMS.

(2) Whenever possible, graduate student assistantship appointments totaling more than 50% should be established as a single appointment, rather than a combination of smaller appointments. (This allows GFS to calculate the appropriate TAL; if entered separately, administrators must determine the appropriate TAL cost and split, and coordinate adjustments to GFS.)

e. Shortened Summer Assistantships
During Summer quarter, when many courses are shorter and the between-quarters period is longer than in Autumn/Winter/Spring quarters, a teaching or research assistantship may be offered for less than the full three-month period, but must be at least two months in duration. Summer assistantships must begin on the quarterly start-date (July 1, unless the student is on the alternate calendar), but the end date may be set at two months or later, rather than the full 3-month period. This should be done only in the Summer Quarter, and only where the research or teaching effort is significantly less than expected in a normal quarter-long appointment. In these cases, the student will earn the full tuition allowance and a specific salary per pay period (often, the department's standard semi-monthly salary). The student should be advised that the shorter work period will generate less total salary.

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6. Salary

Stanford University establishes annually the minimum salary levels for Graduate Student Assistantships. No maximum salary level is specified by the University, although individual schools may do so. (The minimum salary rates for TAs, RAs, and the TAL Tables can be found at http://gfs.stanford.edu/tables.)

Source of Funding

a. Salary for RAs may be paid by an external/sponsored source of funds or school/ departmental funds.

b. Salary for TAs may be paid by a University budget allocation to the schools/departments or by school/departmental funds.

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7. Tuition Allowance (TAL)

a. Definition
TAL represents a commitment to support a student's educational program through the payment of a portion of the student's tuition bill.

b. Eligibility
All eligibility requirements for assistantship appointments must be met. (See section 2.)

c. Source of Funding
The value of TAL for a 50% assistantship appointment is established as the tuition value for 8-10 units (8-9 units in the Law School, and 8 units in the MED MD program). The value of TAL for assistantship appointments of between 10% and 50% is a proportional amount defined by TAL Tables published each year. 

Tuition charges and TAL are based on the student's home school tuition rate, regardless of the location of the assistantship. The school/department where the student holds the assistantship appointment is responsible for the salary, as well as the tuition based on the student's home school tuition rate.

The University requires that any outside tuition support to which students have access will be used to the full extent before TAL is claimed. Acceptance of a Stanford assistantship appointment obliges a student to inform the department of any other aid received.

The cost of the TAL is shared among Stanford University funds and school, department, and/or sponsored project funds supporting the assistantship.

(1) TAL Funding for Research Assistants
TAL for Research Assistants is divided and funded as follows:

  • Sponsored portion: Except for the School of Medicine, 60% of the TAL amount is charged directly to the sponsored project or other source of funds supporting the assistantship; in the School of Medicine, 81% of the TAL amount is directly charged.
  • Stanford portion: 40% of the TAL amount is paid by Stanford University, or by the school in which the assistant is working; the School of Medicine pays 19% of the TAL amount. Except in the Schools of Business and Medicine, University general funds are used to pay the Stanford portion of TAL for Research Assistants. The Schools of Business and Medicine cover the Stanford portion of TAL for Research Assistants from their own funds.

(2) TAL Funding for Teaching Assistants

  • In all schools other than Schools of Business and Medicine, TAL for Teaching Assistants is funded by a University budget allocation to the schools/departments. Schools, departments or programs may also fund additional TAL for Teaching Assistants, beyond the University budget allocation.
  • The Schools of Business and Medicine are responsible for covering the cost of TAL for Teaching Assistants working in their schools.

(3) Federal Work Study (FWS)

  • FWS funds cannot be used to pay TAL.
  • If a student has a research assistantship funded by FWS, the FWS funds pay the student's salary, the school/department pays the "sponsored portion," i.e., 60%, of the tuition, and the University pays the difference, i.e., 40%, from general funds.
  • If a student has a teaching assistantship funded by FWS, the FWS funds pay the student's salary. TAL funding for these students is as described in Section 7.c (2) above.

(4) Students Working in Schools Other Than Where They Are Enrolled
When graduate students are appointed as Teaching or Research Assistants in a school other than the one in which they are enrolled, the school in which the student works is responsible for paying the TAL at the student's home school tuition rate. In the case of Research Assistants, splitting tuition between the sponsored source and the University (either 60%/40% or 81%/19%) is controlled by the school paying the student.

(5) Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR), Terminal Medical Registration (TMR) and Medical School Research Rate (MSRR)

  • TAL cannot be carried forward to pay TGR/TMR/MSRR tuition in future quarters.
  • TGR/TMR/MSRR tuition is paid in full by the associated assistantship (see below). The GFS system will not divide TGR/TMR/MSRR tuition and share the cost with university or school funds.
  • For Research Assistants, TGR/TMR/MSRR tuition is charged directly to the source of funds paying the student's salary.
  • For Teaching Assistants, TGR/TMR/MSRR tuition is paid in the same manner as other TAL funding for Teaching Assistants (see section 2, above).

d. Amount of TAL

(1) Percent Time
The amount of TAL earned depends on the percentage of time of the graduate student assistantship appointment(s). See the Tuition Allowance Tables.

  • The minimum assistantship appointment is 10% and provides TAL equal to the value of two units of tuition. (Note: The minimum tuition charged by Stanford is three units, and therefore a 10% assistantship will not provide enough tuition allowance to cover Stanford's minimum unit-based tuition.)
  • The maximum assistantship appointment during autumn, winter and spring quarters is 50%, and provides TAL equal to the 8-10 unit tuition charge, except in the Law School where they earn the 8-9 unit value and in the MED MD program, where they earn the value of 8 units.
  • For assistantship appointments of 50-90%, the total TAL earned decreases as the percentage of time increases. (For example: A student's 70% appointment(s) earns the same TAL as a 30% appointment.) Appointments of 90% provide TAL equal to the value of 1-3 units of tuition. For the rules governing appointments greater than 50%, see section 5.b.4 (required pre-approval for exceptions, Autumn, Winter and Spring), 5.c (summer), and 5.d. See also Tuition Allowance tables for Summer Quarter.

(2) Length of Assistantships
Appointments are made for a full quarter (see "Percentage and Period of Appointment," Section 5 of this document). Appointments will earn the designated amount of TAL for the full quarter in which the student is appointed.

(3) Multiple Assistantships
Students may hold multiple assistantship appointments, including both RA and TA appointments, simultaneously. At most, the 8-10 unit TAL value may be earned when combining multiple assistantships.

  • Multiple assistantships totaling 50% or less: GFS automatically calculates the total combined percentage of the assistantships that will be the basis for the amount of TAL. For example, two 25% assistantship appointments earn a combined TAL equal to a 50% appointment: 8-10 units. (During the academic year, combined appointments should not total more than 50%; see 5.b, above).
  • Multiple assistantships totaling more than 50% (e.g. in summer): If entered as one appointment with multiple sources of funding, GFS correctly calculates the combined TAL as described in 5.d.1. If entered as separate appointments, GFS cannot do the calculation: administrators must determine both the reduced total TAL and the proportional cost to each appointment, then adjust each appointment's TAL in GFS.

(4) Summer Appointments

  • In summer quarter, some students may enroll in fewer units than the TAL earned by their assistantship appointment(s). In such cases, the TAL for their Summer Quarter Assistantships is reduced by adjusting the TAL amount in GFS to match the actual tuition amount billed.
  • Summer appointments are for three months, even though courses may be scheduled for 8 or 10 weeks. If an appointment ends before the end of the full quarter, salary can be ended on the corresponding date, but students will receive the amount of TAL associated with a full-quarter appointment.

e. Use of TAL
(1)
TAL can be used only in the quarter in which it was generated by an appointment.

(2) TAL may be used only as a credit against tuition charges. It is:

  • Not convertible to cash
  • Not transferable to another student
  • Not usable for any other charges, such as ASSU fees
  • Not applicable to tuition charges for Continuing Studies Program courses

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8. Work in Addition to Assistantship Appointment

To preserve the focus on the student's academic progress, Stanford University formally limits the number of hours a student may be employed while also holding an assistantship appointment. Graduate students are expected to coordinate additional hourly employment with the assistantship appointment, and with their academic obligations, including course load, number of registered units, and the academic expectations of their program. Academic departments/programs, offices employing students, and funding sources may also impose employment limitations. Graduate student hourly employment is described in Administrative Guide Memo 10.2.2: Graduate Student Hourly Employment.

During break periods between quarters--the period between the last day of final examinations and the first day of classes the subsequent quarter--graduate students may be employed full time. Thanksgiving recess is not a break between quarters. Note: The quarter period is different from the assistantship pay periods, as the standard "start" and "stop" dates for assistantships are intended to pay the student continuously including break periods between quarters.

a. Limit on Hours for U.S. Students
During Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters, students on 50% time assistantships may not be employed more than an additional eight hours a week inside Stanford and/or outside of Stanford; those eight hours cannot be in other assistantship positions. During Summer quarter, enrolled graduate students are limited to 36 hours of student employment, combining hourly employment and assistantship appointments.

b. Limit on Hours for International students
International students on F-1 or J-1 visas are subject to both University policies on employment and visa requirements that limit employment; in all cases, the more restrictive limitation will apply. International students are eligible for on-campus employment if they are maintaining their F-1 or J-1 status. During the academic year (Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters), students on F-1 or J-1 visas are limited to a total of 20 hours of employment per week (except the break periods between quarters), including both hourly jobs and assistantship appointments), and including any off-campus employment that they may have been authorized to perform. For further information regarding regulations for students with F-1 and J-1 visas, contact Bechtel International Center.

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9. Cancellation or Modification of Assistantship Appointments

a. Cancellation as of the Start Date of the Assistantship
If an appointment is cancelled on or before the start date of the assistantship:

(1) No salary is paid.
(2) No Tuition Allowance is provided.
(3) If Tuition Allowance has been applied to the student's bill, it will be withdrawn.
(4) The student is responsible for any tuition charges for the quarter.

b. Cancellation of Appointment During the Quarter of the Assistantship
(1)
If the school or department terminates the assistantship for any reason during the quarter, other than for cause, salary will end but the student will receive the full quarter TAL. This includes circumstances where sponsored funding for an assistantship ends.

(2) If a graduate student voluntarily terminates an assistantship appointment or is removed for cause during the quarter, salary ends and TAL is withdrawn for the quarter.

(3) Salary ends and TAL will be applied as needed to pay the student's bill for the quarter when an assistantship appointment is terminated because a student has:

  • Completed all of the degree requirements and leaves the University, or
  • Formally withdrawn from a degree program and leaves the University, or
  • Taken an approved Leave of Absence from the University (for emergency/medical needs).

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10. Taxes and Tax Reporting

a. Salaries and Tuition Allowance

  • All salaries from assistantships awarded after August 16, 1986, are subject to federal and state income tax and tax withholding.
  • Tuition Allowance associated with assistantships for degree-seeking students is not subject to tax.

b. Exemption from FICA and VDI Taxes
Enrollment and regular attendance in courses or fulfillment of other requirements associated with a degree program are required for all students in each quarter of their appointment(s), including summer, in order to qualify for exemption from FICA (Social Security) and VDI (Voluntary Disability Insurance) taxes.

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11. Benefits

The graduate appointments described in this Guide Memo are designed for and available only to Stanford students.

a. Time Off
Assistantship appointments do not accrue vacation leave.

Students with research or teaching assistantship appointments will receive a lump sum of 24 hours of paid sick time per calendar year, which is available for use during any period of assistantship appointment during the year. Sick time does not carry over from one calendar year to the next.

Arrangements for any variations in work hours, including time off for vacation, jury duty, illness, or related use of sick time should be made individually with the faculty sponsor. To the extent possible, students are encouraged to make arrangements outside of their working hours and faculty sponsors are encouraged to offer flexibility in work hours.

Regular semi-monthly salary is paid during periods when sick time is used. When sick time is used, the student notifies Payroll via Help Ticket. Sick time accrued for an assistantship appointment is paid only when used to replace work hours during the course of employment as a research or teaching assistant. Otherwise, sick balances are not paid out. Graduate students who have student hourly employment, either concurrently or at different times of the year, will see a separate accounting of sick time accrued for the student hourly employment (see Administrative Guide Memo 10.3.1: Sick Time for Student Hourly Employees).

Students with research or teaching assistantship appointments may use sick time for themselves or a family member: for absences due to illness; for preventive care or diagnoses, care, or treatment of an existing health condition; or for purposes related to domestic violence, sexual assaults, or stalking.

b. Health Insurance
Eligibility for a health insurance benefit is determined quarterly on the basis of assistantship and fellowship appointments approved as of the payroll deadline of each quarter. Graduate students are eligible for a health insurance subsidy as long as they do not waive Cardinal Care insurance or have their insurance paid fully by an outside source of funds. The Health Insurance subsidy will be paid as follows:

  • Students with assistantship appointments for 25% time or more per quarter will receive a subsidy paying approximately 50% of the cost of the single-student Cardinal Care premium.
  • Students with assistantship appointments of less than 25% time per quarter will receive a subsidy paying approximately 25% of the cost of the single-student Cardinal Care premium.

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12. Resources for Additional Information

  • All graduate student assistantships must be entered online using the Graduate Financial Support (GFS) system in PeopleSoft.
  • For policy questions, refer to the GFS Policy Website.
  • For entry questions, contact the IT Help Desk at 5-4357 (5-HELP), or http://helpsu.stanford.edu.
  • For graduate student health insurance, contact Vaden Health Center.
  • Salary rates and Tuition Allowance tables: The minimum salary rates for TAs, RAs, and the TAL Tables can be found at http://gfs.stanford.edu/tables.

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10.2.2 Graduate Student Hourly Employment

Last updated on:
02/08/2016

This Guide Memo outlines policies and procedures for employment of Stanford graduate students on campus in positions other than assistantships. For employment of graduate students in research and teaching assistantships, see Guide Memo 10.2.1. For employment of undergraduate students, see Guide Memo 10.1.1.

Authority: 

Approved by the Vice Provost for Graduate Education.

Applicability: 

Applies to the employment of graduate students in positions other than assistantships.

1. Definitions and Distinctions

a. Student hourly employment. Stanford University uses student hourly employment to hire Stanford students into jobs that are specifically earmarked for matriculated students. Student workers are supervised in their work, are hired through the PeopleSoft HR system, and must record and approve their work hours. Compensation is established on an hourly basis, and the amount of pay is based on the actual number of hours worked in each pay period.

These job assignments are incidental to the student’s course of study with reasonable limitations placed during the academic quarter on the nature of the work assignment and the number of hours of employment.

All Stanford University student employment is hourly, with the exception of assistantships, which are limited to graduate students (see Admin Guide 10.2.1). Hourly employment should never be used to pay a graduate student for work that is appropriately treated as an assistantship.

b. Graduate student. This policy applies to students who are enrolled in a graduate degree program (any degree except the BA, BS, or BAS). For purposes of student employment, students enrolled in both undergraduate and graduate degree programs as coterminal students are considered undergraduate students while assessed undergraduate tuition and graduate students while assessed graduate tuition.

c. The Graduate Financial Support (GFS) system is the online application used to enter all research and teaching assistantship appointments, fellowships, and other stipend payments for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars. It is not used to process hourly employment.

d. Job Classification Codes (JCC) are used to categorize all jobs at Stanford. Students should be hired into the appropriate student JCC for the job for which they are employed. Use of the appropriate JCC ensures that the correct expenditure type and fringe benefit rate are applied as wages are paid.

Distinctions from Hourly Employment:

  • Graduate Student Assistantships are a form of student employment, earning a compensation package including both salary and tuition allowance (TAL) for the performance of research or teaching services to the University as part of the student's academic and professional training and development, see Guide Memo 10.2.1. Hourly employment is not a substitute for an assistantship appointment.
  • Honorarium is a stipend payment to recognize a student for an accomplishment or a one-time event or project, such as a recruitment weekend. Honoraria are not used as compensation for employment. Graduate student honorarium payments are processed as stipends in the GFS system.
  • Off-Campus Internships and Off-Campus Employment are not covered by this policy. In both cases, students are encouraged to be mindful that their primary obligation is to their academic program. International students must also adhere to visa requirements.
  • Contingent (Casual or Temporary) Employment is used to hire an individual for a part-time or temporary staff position. Contingent employment must be used for hourly employment assignments for non-matriculated students, such as Visiting Student Researchers, and for matriculated students when on a Leave of Absence. Contingent employment is not normally used for enrolled, matriculated Stanford students, but must be used for any student working more than 36 hours per week.

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2. Limits on Hours of Employment

Graduate students are expected to limit their hours of employment, so that they may devote sufficient attention to their studies. Therefore, graduate students are expected to coordinate the number of hours of employment with their academic obligations, including course load, number of registered units, and the academic expectations of their program. Additionally, they are expected to coordinate hourly employment with the other forms of financial support that they are receiving. Academic departments/programs, offices employing students, and funding sources may also impose employment limitations.

Limits on hourly employment and related enrollment limitations for graduate students are summarized in Table 1.

a. Limit on Hours
There are formal limits on the number of hours a student may be employed when also financially supported by assistantships or fellowships.

During Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters, enrolled graduate students are limited to 28 hours of student employment, combining hourly employment and assistantship appointments. (International students are subject to additional limitations, see below.) For example, graduate students appointed to 50% (20 hours/week) assistantships may not be employed more than an additional eight hours a week; those additional hours cannot be in other assistantship positions. Graduate students with full fellowship funding are limited to additional employment of 8 hours/week hourly employment or a 25% assistantship, but not both. The source of the fellowship or the student’s academic department/program may impose stricter limits.

During Summer quarter, enrolled graduate students are limited to 36 hours of student employment, combining hourly employment and assistantship appointments. (International students may be subject to additional limitations, see below.) For example, students on 50% time (20 hours/week) assistantships may not be employed more than an additional 16 hours a week; those additional hours can combine either assistantships or hourly employment. In summer, students who are employed more than 8 hours with a 50% assistantship are expected to reduce the number of units of enrollment commensurate with a larger percentage appointment. (This is shown in the TAL table for Summer Quarter.) Graduate students with full fellowship funding are limited to additional employment of 16 hours/week hourly employment or a 50% assistantship, but not both. The source of the fellowship or the student’s academic department/program may impose stricter limits.

During break periods between quarters—the period between the last day of final examinations and the first day of classes the subsequent quarter—graduate students may be employed full time. Thanksgiving recess is not a break between quarters.

b. Additional Limits on Hours for International Students on F-1 or J-1 Visas

International students on F-1 or J-1 visas are subject to both University policies on employment and visa requirements that limit employment; in all cases, the more restrictive limitation will apply.

International students are eligible for on-campus employment if they are maintaining F-1 or J-1 status. During the academic year (Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters), students on F-1or J-1 visas are limited to a total of 20 hours of employment per week (except during the break periods between quarters), including both hourly jobs and assistantship appointment(s), and including any off-campus employment that they may have been authorized to perform.

During Summer quarter, most international students are subject to the general University policies for summer graduate student employment, and their F-1 or J-1 visa does not further restrict their hours of employment. However, any graduate student who is required to enroll full time in summer quarter in order to maintain legal visa status—such as newly admitted students who will start their program in the summer, or those students returning from a leave of absence in the summer—may not work more than a combined total of 20 hours per week.

During break periods between quarters—the period between the last day of finals and the first day of classes the subsequent quarter—international graduate students may be employed full time (up to 40 hours per week), provided they are eligible and intend to register for the next academic quarter. Thanksgiving recess is not a break between quarters.

Although federal regulations allow for full-time on-campus employment during break periods, departments/programs may have other restrictions and policies that limit the amount of on-campus employment during break periods. If this is the case, then these policies take precedence. Students must check with their department/program for any restrictions.

Further information regarding employment limits for students on F-1 or J-1 visas is available from the Bechtel International Center.

c. Additional Limits on Hours for International Students with other Visas

International students who have a visa besides an F-1 or J-1 visas should check with the Bechtel International Center to determine if they are in a status that allows employment and, if so, any restrictions on employment.

Table 1: Maximum Number of Hours of Hourly Employment Permitted per Week
 

Funding source or the student’s academic department/program may impose stricter limits. Footnotes describe the related limitations on enrollment.

Other Funding 50% assistantship1 assistantship between 10-40% Full fellowship no other financial support
ACADEMIC YEAR
U.S. student 8 hours 28 hours minus hours of assistantship 8 hours or 25% assistantship, but not both 28 hours
International student on F-1 or J-1 Visa 0 hours 20 hours minus hours of assistantship 8 hours or 25% assistantship, but not both 20 hours
SUMMER
U.S. student;
International student whose visa status permits part-time summer enrollment
16 hours 36 hours minus hours of assistantship2, 3 16 hours or 50% assistantship, but not both 36 hours.
More than 36 hours
requires hiring as a
Contingent (Casual
or Temporary
)
employee through
Human Resources.
International student whose F-1
or J-1 Visa requires full-time enrollment
0 hours 20 hours minus hours of assistantship 16 hours or 50% assistantship, but not both 20 hours
BREAK PERIODS BETWEEN QUARTERS*
U.S. student Full Time
International
student on
F-1 or J-1 Visa
Full Time4

* Break periods do not include holiday days during the quarter (e.g., Memorial Day, President’s day), nor Thanksgiving recess.

1 Students with a 50% appointment are limited to 10 units, TGR, or graduation quarter enrollment.

2 In summer, students who are employed more than 8 hours with an assistantship of 50% or more are expected to reduce the number of units of enrollment commensurate with a larger percentage appointment.

3 The percentage of the assistantship appointment determines the amount of Tuition Allowance (TAL) that is provided and the expectations for the number of units of enrollment. This is shown in the TAL table for Summer Quarter.

4 International graduate students may be employed full time during break periods between quarters provided they are eligible and intend to register for the next academic quarter.

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3. Hiring, Paying and Supervising Students

a. Hiring
The supervisor notifies the human resources administrator to make the appropriate system entry. The students should be hired into the appropriate Job Classification Code (JCC). The student must be hired into PeopleSoft HR before beginning work. Students who are hired during Summer quarter, but who are not enrolled, must be hired as Student Hourly Employees using the appropriate Summer Student JCC. This step is required even if the student is continuing a work assignment that started during the academic year.

Before hiring a graduate student for hourly employment, a graduate student assistantship, or any other type of appointment through Human Resources the hiring department should contact the student’s academic home department/program to review the appointment (see the GFS School contact list). The hourly appointment must be reviewed for appropriateness taking into account:

  • The student’s academic obligations, including course load, number of registered units, and other expectations
  • Other forms of financial support that the student is receiving, including fellowships and assistantships. Funding sources may impose limits on hourly employment
  • Any limits that the student’s home academic department/program imposes (e.g., program may limit hourly student employment)
  • Limitations placed on international students

Students who receive a university award that includes funding to hire graduate students to complete hourly work (e.g., coding, transcription, or other effort associated with academic projects) are subject to these policies. In such cases, the department should manage the funding and hire the student hourly employee.

b. Wage rates
There is no suggested wage scale for hourly employment for graduate students. When setting the hourly wage rate for a graduate student, the following may be taken into consideration:

  • The tasks required of the student, including the level of independence, judgment and expertise;
  • The student’s experience in similar work assignments;
  • Wage rate paid to other graduate students in department for comparable work.

c. Payment
Departments pay student workers from their own sources of funding.

Hourly student workers must record actual hours worked in Axess Timecard each pay period. Each month has two pay periods: The first day of the month through the 15th and the 16th through the last day of the month. Paychecks are issued on the workday that falls on or immediately prior to the seventh calendar day after the end of each pay period.

d. Supervision
One person should be named as the student’s immediate supervisor and should be directly accountable for overseeing the student’s work and approving the hours worked in Axess.

e. Work Schedules and Requirements
A student is expected to work the agreed hours, be punctual, and satisfy all reasonable requirements of the employer with regard to performance and behavior. Most on-campus employers build in some flexibility in hours given students’ exam schedules, but that is not always possible and students are expected to carry through if they have agreed to be at work.

f. Sick Time
Sick time provides a mechanism to pay graduate student hourly employees when they are unable to perform their work responsibilities due to illness or for other related reasons as detailed below. All Stanford student hourly employees receive sick time benefits. Arrangements for any variations in work hours, including time off for illness or related uses of sick time, should be made individually with the student hourly employee’s supervisor. To the extent possible, student hourly employees are encouraged to make arrangements outside of their working hours and supervisors are encouraged to offer flexibility in work hours.

For information about the accrual and use of sick time for student hourly employees, see Administrative Guide Memo 10.3.1: Sick Time for Student Hourly Employees.

g. Job Listing
Stanford departments wishing to hire graduate students may use the system administered by BEAM (Bridging Education, Ambition and Meaningful Work) to list their job openings. Departments should log onto Handshake to post a job. Departments may also use their own means of locating student employees.

h. Non-Discrimination
Non-discrimination policies applicable to regular staff, as stated in Guide Memo 2.1.2, section 2.a., also apply to student employees.

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10.3.1 Sick Time for Student Hourly Employees

Last updated on:
07/01/2015

This Guide Memo summarizes paid sick time accrual and usage policies for Stanford student hourly employees.

Authority: 

This Guide Memo was approved by the Vice President for Human Resources.

Applicability: 

Applies to all Stanford undergraduate student employees as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 10.1.1: Undergraduate Student Employment on Campus and Stanford graduate student hourly employees as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 10.2.2: Graduate Student Hourly Employment. This policy is effective starting on July 1, 2015.

1. Sick Time Benefits

Sick time provides a mechanism to pay student hourly employees when they are unable to perform their scheduled work responsibilities due to illness or for other related reasons as detailed below. All Stanford “student hourly employees” (as defined in section 2. Definitions, below) receive sick time benefits. Arrangements for any variations in work hours, including time off for illness or related uses of sick time, should be made individually with the student hourly employee’s supervisor. To the extent possible, student hourly employees are encouraged to make arrangements outside of their working hours and supervisors are encouraged to offer flexibility in work hours.

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2. Definitions

All Stanford undergraduate and graduate students who are hired on an hourly basis are referred to as “student hourly employees” in this policy. This Administrative Guide Memo applies to Stanford students hired on an hourly basis as defined in Administrative Guide Memo 10.1.1: Undergraduate Student Employment on Campus and Administrative Guide Memo 10.2.2: Graduate Student Hourly Employment. Graduate students hired in an assistantship appointment (see Administrative Guide Memo 10.2.1: Graduate Student Assistantships) and Postdoctoral Fellows and Postdoctoral Research Affiliates (see Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.1: Definitions) are not student hourly employees.

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3. Accrual and Recording of Sick Time

a. Accrual of Sick Time

Student hourly employees accrue sick time as follows:

  • Student hourly employees accrue sick time at the rate of .03334 hours per hour worked. This equates to one (1) hour of sick time for every 30 hours worked.
  • Unused sick time accumulates from year-to-year, with a maximum limit of 48 hours or six (6) days.
  • Student hourly employees accrue sick time for all hourly jobs worked at Stanford, regardless of the department of employment. When a student hourly employee leaves one position and accepts another position within the University, the student hourly employee’s sick time balance is maintained as long as the new position starts within 12 months of the date of termination from the first position. If the new position is not a student hourly employee position, the student hourly employee is subject to any sick time policies applicable to the new position, including, without limitation, any policies regarding sick time use and limits on sick time accruals.

b. Recording Sick Time Accrual

A student hourly employee’s accrued sick time is recorded in Axess with the sick time balance reported on the student hourly employee’s pay statement.

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4. Use of Sick Time

Sick time is paid only when used to replace scheduled work hours during the course of employment. Otherwise, sick time balances are not paid out.

Arrangements for any variations in work hours, including time off for illness or related uses of sick time, should be made individually with the student hourly employee’s supervisor. To the extent possible, student hourly employees are encouraged to schedule appointments at a time outside of working hours. Where flexible schedules are possible, supervisors are encouraged to accommodate appointments by flexing a student hourly employee’s work hours.

Student hourly employees are entitled to use accrued sick time beginning on the 90th calendar day after the start of employment. Sick time must be accrued before it can be used. The use of sick time is limited to 24 hours or three scheduled work days, whichever is greater, each year of employment. Sick time may only be used for an absence that a student hourly employee has during scheduled work hours.

Sick time is not paid out when a student hourly employee ends employment for any reason, including, without limitation, no longer being employed in a student hourly employee position, leaving the University for any reason, taking a leave of absence, or being in non-enrollment status.

Sick time may be used for the following reasons:

a. Absence Due to Illness or Injury

  Sick time may be used when a student hourly employee’s illness or injury prevents the student hourly employee from working.

b. Medical and Dental Appointments

Sick time may be used for all medical and dental appointments, including:

  • Diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition
  • Preventive care
  • Those appointments associated with a work injury (e.g., physical therapy)

c. Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking

Sick time may be used by a student hourly employee who is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking in order to:

  • Obtain or attempt to obtain any relief, including, but not limited to, a temporary restraining order, restraining order, or other injunctive relief, to help ensure the health, safety, or welfare of the victim or his or her child
  • Seek medical attention for injuries caused by domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Obtain services from a domestic violence shelter, program, or rape crisis center as a result of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Obtain psychological counseling related to an experience of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking
  • Participate in safety planning and take other actions to increase safety from future domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including temporary or permanent relocation

d. Family Sick Time

Student hourly employees may use sick time for diagnosis, care, or treatment of an existing health condition of, or preventive care for, a student hourly employee’s family  member. For the purpose of this policy, a family member includes the student hourly employee’s:

  • Spouse or registered domestic partner
  • Children of the student hourly employee or spouse or registered domestic partner (including a biological, adopted, or foster child, stepchild, legal ward, or a child to whom the student hourly employee stands in loco parentis, regardless of the child’s age or dependency status)
  • Parents and parents-in-law (including a biological, adoptive, or foster parent, stepparent, or legal guardian of a student hourly employee or the student hourly employee’s spouse or registered domestic partner, or a person who stood in loco parentis when the student hourly employee was a minor)
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Grandparents or grandchildren
  • Other family member dependent on the student hourly employee and living in the student hourly employee's household

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5. Administration

a. Notification of Absence

The student hourly employee reports an absence (or planned absence) to the supervisor. The department is responsible for establishing and communicating rules on how student hourly employees notify the department of absences. If the need for sick time use is foreseeable, the student hourly employee should provide reasonable advance notice. If the need for sick time use is unforeseeable, the student hourly employee should provide notice of the need for sick time use as soon as practicable. If a student hourly employee requests to use accrued sick time and the student hourly employee’s use of sick time is within applicable limits per year of employment, the request should not be denied because details are not provided about the sick time use.

To the extent possible, student hourly employees are encouraged to schedule appointments at a time outside of working hours. Where flexible schedules are possible, supervisors are encouraged to accommodate appointments by flexing a student hourly employee’s work hours.

b. Medical Confirmation

(1) Medical confirmation related to use of sick time

Acceptable medical evidence may be required for the use of sick time. However, for a student hourly employee's use of the first 24 hours of sick time (or three scheduled work days, whichever is greater) during each year of employment, excepting circumstances involving abuse or misuse of sick time as stated in subpart (2) below, supervisors may not require acceptable medical evidence, and supervisors should not deny sick time use based on a student hourly employee's failure to provide details about the sick time use. The supervisor who approves the use of sick time is responsible for confirming that the conditions for use of sick time are met.

(2) Medical confirmation related to possible abuse or misuse of sick time

If the University has reasonable basis to believe that a student hourly employee may have engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time at any time (even during the first 24 hours or three scheduled workdays of sick time use during each year of employment), the University may ask for acceptable medical evidence or other proof showing that a student hourly employee has not engaged in abuse or misuse of sick time. Abuse or misuse of sick time, failure to follow sick time notification procedures (i.e., failing to provide reasonable advance notice for foreseeable sick time use, not providing requested medical information when abuse or misuse is suspected, or not giving notice as soon as practicable for unforeseeable sick time use) may be a basis for discipline, up to and including termination of employment. Also, use of sick time may be denied if there is abuse or misuse of sick time.

(3) Acceptable medical evidence

Acceptable medical evidence includes, but is not limited to, a healthcare practitioner’s statement that certifies a medical need for sick time, the expected duration of absence and anticipated return to work date, and any work-related limitations or restrictions (including the duration of those limitations or restrictions) when the student hourly employee is released to return to work.

c. Reporting Sick Time Use

Student hourly employees record hours of sick time used in the Axess Timecard each pay period. Student hourly employees may only be paid for the number of sick time hours that they have accrued and which is available to them. The use of sick time is limited to 24 hours or three scheduled work days each year of employment, whichever is greater. Up to 24 hours of sick time use may be recorded in Axess; if a student hourly employee has three scheduled work days of sick time use that exceeds 24 hours, the student hourly   employee should request assistance from the local Human Resources office. Student hourly employees are not paid for time spent away from work in excess of the sick time limit per year of employment, and such time is not recorded in Axess. For information about Axess see this Time & Leave System overview.

d. Sick Time Credit Date

Sick time must be accrued before it can be used. Sick time is credited at the beginning of each month of service, calculated based upon work hours recorded during the previous month. If a student hourly employee needs to use sick time that has been accrued but not yet credited in Axess, the student hourly employee should speak to the local Human Resources office for assistance.

e. Tax Status

Income that the student hourly employee receives for sick time is taxable. Applicable taxes are deducted.

f. Multiple Forms of Employment

Student hourly employees who are employed by Stanford in other ways are affected as follows:

  • Assistantships: Graduate students who have assistantship appointments, either concurrently or at different times of the year, will see a separate accounting of sick time accrued for the assistantship appointment. (For more information, see Administrative Guide Memo 10.2.1: Graduate Student Assistantships)
  • Temporary or casual employment: Students who are hired as temporary or casual employees in the same 12 month period in which they were student hourly employees will have previously accrued sick time, up to the applicable limits, available for use. Temporary or casual employment for students typically occurs in summer, following graduation, or when a student is on a leave of absence
  • Scholarship, fellowship, and stipend support: Students who receive stipend support for a scholarship, fellowship, or other reasons, are not Stanford employees and do not receive a sick time benefit

g. Sources of Funds for Sick Time

As sick time is used to replace scheduled work time, it should be recorded in Axess on the timecard associated with the job for which the work time was scheduled. Sick time used is charged to the department that owns this job record. Departments employing a student on Federal Work Study must provide their own unrestricted funding to pay for sick time when used. This unrestricted PTA should be recorded on the timecard as sick time is used.

h. Applicable Laws

The intent of this Administrative Guide Memo 10.3.1 is to meet or exceed requirements of all applicable laws, including, without limitation, the California Paid Sick Leave Law enacted by Assembly Bill 1522.

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